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Old 11-08-2008, 01:37 AM   #1
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A little advice-57 Overlander and propane "system"...

So, I know I am way ahead of myself asking this so soon, considering my 1957 Overlander will require pretty much a complete overhaul.

I am in the process of gutting her. I am trying to save as much as I can, but with the floor pretty rotted through and through-all the wood in the cabinets and twin beds absolutely covered in mold and mildew-*sighs*. I think it is bound to me more of a renovation than a restoration. I will save as much as I can by sanding and painting and doing what I need to do, but sometimes that just isn't enough.

I posted about how nervous I was about the propane system removal and install and doing the electrical work since it is still original to 1957. Scary. But so cool at the same time. Anyway, I found someone who is going to do my electrical work who knows what he is doing.

My question is this: do I have any way of testing the propane system?

I would much rather have to replace the tanks and apply the "KISS" rule (Keep it Simple, Stupid) than have to take everything out and install brand new. Although, if it is indeed the original install, I suppose I will have to anyway.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

Sue
1957 Custom Overlander "Kalea"
S.O. (Significant Other) Lino
ferrets:Stoli, Nikki and Emo
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Old 11-08-2008, 05:04 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by SUEHOWIE View Post
So, I know I am way ahead of myself asking this so soon, considering my 1957 Overlander will require pretty much a complete overhaul.

I am in the process of gutting her. I am trying to save as much as I can, but with the floor pretty rotted through and through-all the wood in the cabinets and twin beds absolutely covered in mold and mildew-*sighs*. I think it is bound to me more of a renovation than a restoration. I will save as much as I can by sanding and painting and doing what I need to do, but sometimes that just isn't enough.

I posted about how nervous I was about the propane system removal and install and doing the electrical work since it is still original to 1957. Scary. But so cool at the same time. Anyway, I found someone who is going to do my electrical work who knows what he is doing.

My question is this: do I have any way of testing the propane system?

I would much rather have to replace the tanks and apply the "KISS" rule (Keep it Simple, Stupid) than have to take everything out and install brand new. Although, if it is indeed the original install, I suppose I will have to anyway.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

Sue
1957 Custom Overlander "Kalea"
S.O. (Significant Other) Lino
ferrets:Stoli, Nikki and Emo
Hi Sue;
Propane system [lines and compression fitting] are unfortunately not for the one who is not familiar with the intricacies of flaring tubing. Since your life may depend on it, I recommend that you hire someone to test it for you. The system being 50 years old, may be heavily oxidized and have fractures or cracks in tubing or the fittings. Appliance components may have issues which may expose you to danger. It is definitely not a job for amateur. Pending the condition of entire system, you may have to replace many components. Farm out this job to a pro. Thanks, "Boatdoc"
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Old 11-08-2008, 07:14 AM   #3
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tanks

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Originally Posted by boatdoc View Post
It is definitely not a job for amateur. Pending the condition of entire system, you may have to replace many components. Farm out this job to a pro. Thanks, "Boatdoc"
I would have to agree wih Boatdoc about the gas system,"It is definitely not a job for amateur".

Here are a couple of things to think about.

The tanks are most likely steel and you may want to replace them unless they are aluminum. Here is an article about the pros and cons on the Overfill Protection Device (OPD) on the LP Gas tanks.

Click here to read the article.

If you know you are going to replace your tanks then replacing the tanks, hoses, and regulator/automatic change over makes sence too.

This is why---
Another great benefit of the OPD from a convenience stand point is the way you can attach the hose. The new valves support a "hand tighten" attachment, verses the old "brass and wrench". If you have ever had the old style you know what I'm talking about.

If your going to replace regulator/automatic change over

Click here to see the automatic change over

Click here to see the hoses

You can do that yourself and you will find that the regulator/automatic change over will tell you if you have a leak.
Cut off all appliances, and with you new regulator/automatic change over installed, open up the valve on the gas tank. You can hear the gas run. If it keeps running, cut it off. You have a major leak.

If it does not you will notice that there is a green ring around the top of the regulator/automatic change over. You can then turn the valve off.

The neat part about that regulator/automatic change over is - if the ring stays green you have a sealed system. You don't have a leak. If it turns red you have a leak. I would leave the valve off for 5 or 6 hours to see if you have a leak. If the regulator/automatic change over has a green ring after that time, you don't have a leak.

Dan
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Old 11-08-2008, 02:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boatdoc View Post
Hi Sue;
Propane system [lines and compression fitting] are unfortunately not for the one who is not familiar with the intricacies of flaring tubing. Since your life may depend on it, I recommend that you hire someone to test it for you. The system being 50 years old, may be heavily oxidized and have fractures or cracks in tubing or the fittings. Appliance components may have issues which may expose you to danger. It is definitely not a job for amateur. Pending the condition of entire system, you may have to replace many components. Farm out this job to a pro. Thanks, "Boatdoc"
This was what I was thinking-I have posted in other posts that I am fairly terrified of doing the propane and the electrical. Everything else I can do...and am really looking forward to it all. I know it sounds silly but I have already picked out my colors on the interior-kind of a goal to work towards, but knowing I have a TON of things I have to do before I can even think of getting to that point.

But, where does one find a person who would be specialized in this arena? An RV store? A propane place (in the back of my mind I am picturing Strickland Propane and a Hank Hill type looking at Kalea...lol). I am creative in research and finding resources...but this one...eek.

I have cruised Craigslist and I have found "Certified RV Specialists" listed. But, what on earth makes them certified and what does that qualify them to do??

Can you tell I am a noob?



Sue
1957 Custom Overlander 26'
S.O. (Significant other) Lino
Ferrets: Stoli, Nikki and Emo
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Old 11-08-2008, 07:01 PM   #5
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i would recommend simply replacing the entire propane system. it's 50 years old. i'm in the middle of renovating my '56 flying cloud and the idea of trying to reuse the existing propane system (i got rid of it when i first gutted it) just doesn't seem wise. you're going to need new tanks and regulators at a minimum, so all you're talking about now is running new lines, which you should do anyway.
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Old 11-08-2008, 07:21 PM   #6
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Sue, First of all, I like to do things a little different. I would strongly recommend that you remove all propane lines, label them as to where they came from and then save them. Then buy a tubing flaring kit. If your trailer is like mine, the main run will be 1/2 inch. You will branch off from the 1/2 inch to 3/8th inch for the appliances. Buy some 1/2 copper tubing and practice flaring the tubing. There are lots of places on the internet where you can learn this. Remember, no matter what people tell you, these trailers were built by regular people, not rocket scientists. You can do anything they did. I have just purchased several book on electrical systems. I will be learning that. If you run into a tough spot, just log on and ask. The only way you can be sure it is done right is to do it yourself. This is too great of a learning opportunity too pass up. You can do it lady!!

NUTZ
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Old 11-08-2008, 10:44 PM   #7
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I would have to agree with alumanutz, Give it a shot, worst case senario you are out the $100 for materials and you have to get someone else to do it. I have done some Gas work and the most important tool is "snoop" its soapy water in a squeeze bottle. Squeeze some of this on your conections and if it bubbles re-tighten. It is gas fitting not rocket science, and i belive that you can do it, and the same with the electrical, there are lots of threads about wiring systems.
Good luck and have fun
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