View Poll Results: Guess the tongue weight
under 250 lbs 3 9.68%
250 to 275 lbs 1 3.23%
275 to 300 lbs 5 16.13%
300 to 325 lbs 9 29.03%
325 to 350lbs 2 6.45%
Over 350 lbs 11 35.48%
Voters: 31. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-08-2010, 10:34 AM   #225
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Originally Posted by GREENovaters View Post
Before you continue let's talk about a few things you may wish to incorporate that will make life much more comfortable, energy efficient and longer lasting.
O.K. you got my attention. Can you elaborate? I'm always open to suggestions and comments.
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Old 12-08-2010, 11:57 AM   #226
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Your doing a really good job. In the future you might want to
oil spray your trailer with Krown Rust Proofing.
The people at Krown were very professional.
I mentioned to them where to drill the holes etc . Spraying frame members etc.
They did a bang up job. By spraying yearly it should prevent you from having
to do this tough job again for a very long time!!! Wish you the best!!
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Old 12-08-2010, 09:50 PM   #227
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Rather than gunk up the underside with oil every year, lots of folks here remove the belly pan and paint the steel frame with a good anti-rust paint, like POR15 as an example. Do it once and forget it.
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Old 12-08-2010, 10:11 PM   #228
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Originally Posted by william Haym View Post
Your doing a really good job. In the future you might want to
oil spray your trailer with Krown Rust Proofing.
The people at Krown were very professional.
I mentioned to them where to drill the holes etc . Spraying frame members etc.
They did a bang up job. By spraying yearly it should prevent you from having
to do this tough job again for a very long time!!! Wish you the best!!
I have POR-15'd the frame it will never rust.
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Old 12-08-2010, 10:11 PM   #229
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Originally Posted by Aage View Post
Rather than gunk up the underside with oil every year, lots of folks here remove the belly pan and paint the steel frame with a good anti-rust paint, like POR15 as an example. Do it once and forget it.
binder dundat
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Old 12-08-2010, 11:26 PM   #230
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I have spray foam insulation under the floor, PO job. I am finding it has protected the frame. I can't assume anything about fire resistance, but wet is not an issue.

About sealing the belly pan and skins (banana wraps), I was told to not seal these areas, but to permit any rainwater to flow freely down to the belly pan. Holding water between skins, against any framing, old insulation (the pink s**t?) is the source of a lot of rot from the edges of the floor inward.

Window sealing is part of the job, but also, figuring out how to get any runoff going down to the pan and out. While moving down the road, air flow can help with drying, maybe would also permit a lot of dust from the road.

I'm working on these areas now, also, so I'm checking out ideas. Keeping varmints out of the lower pan while encouraging the structure to breathe is something like trial and error, and tweaking, and more trial.

Does anyone else plan to use spray foam insulation below the floor?

Thanks
Anne
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Old 12-09-2010, 12:13 AM   #231
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Originally Posted by IndyAnne View Post
I have spray foam insulation under the floor, PO job. I am finding it has protected the frame. I can't assume anything about fire resistance, but wet is not an issue.

About sealing the belly pan and skins (banana wraps), I was told to not seal these areas, but to permit any rainwater to flow freely down to the belly pan. Holding water between skins, against any framing, old insulation (the pink s**t?) is the source of a lot of rot from the edges of the floor inward.

Window sealing is part of the job, but also, figuring out how to get any runoff going down to the pan and out. While moving down the road, air flow can help with drying, maybe would also permit a lot of dust from the road.

I'm working on these areas now, also, so I'm checking out ideas. Keeping varmints out of the lower pan while encouraging the structure to breathe is something like trial and error, and tweaking, and more trial.

Does anyone else plan to use spray foam insulation below the floor?

Thanks
Anne
Anne I have used Produx closed cell foam and foil insulation. It does not retain water. I have gone a different approach to the belly and wraps. I have sealed everything up tight. The floor is totally waterproof with special paint used to make aquariums. The c channel is sealed to the floor top and bottom, all bolts and screws through the floor are sealed with the same rubber paint. The skins were sealed with vulkem between the c channel. The belly is sealed with vulkem at every seam and rivet. The side wraps and rivets are sealed with vulkem. The lower beltline and rivets are sealed with vulkem and then the top edges of all seams and trim is sealed with Parbond. All exterior openings are triple and sometimes quadruple sealed. Roof vents etc have butyl tape between component and shell then sealed with vulkem and then covered with Dicor lap sealant. Then I moved inside and sealed every seam, rivet and opening with vulkem. So far I have used about 15 tubes of vulkem and 6 tubes of Dicor and several rolls of Butyl and 4 small tubes of Parbond. It has taken a long time but I am sure that this trailer will not leak. Amazingly enough I found that the seam between the roof shell skin and the side wall skins were corroded and leaking even though the roof overlaps the sides water seemed to flow uphill and leak inside.
Spray foam while covering well is very time consuming to remove if repairs are needed and it will trap water from exiting. The old fiberglass insulation was excellent at keeping water in the belly. It acts like a sponge and absorbs the water and keeps it there to wick up into the floor and against the frame.
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Old 12-09-2010, 05:15 AM   #232
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Chris, where did you get your c channel that ties the shell to the floor?
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Old 12-09-2010, 06:40 AM   #233
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Chris, where did you get your c channel that ties the shell to the floor?
Daniel I was able to reuse mine. Here is a link to some.
Floor Channel Bow - Narrow Body104463 [104463] - $58.95 : Out-of-Doors Mart!, More Airstream Parts on-line than anyone!
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Old 12-09-2010, 10:25 AM   #234
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Hi, wasagachris,
Wow, amazing project! I hope you will post from time to time about how it is holding up. Just a thought: will this trailer be parked, or will it travel? Maybe you said so earlier, but I missed it.

I do agree about the wicking properties of the fiberglass insulation. It happens in homes, unfortunately, but it also helps let you know you have a problem. When the wall board looks wet, it's time to check the roof, etc.

I'm sure this could open up a can of something: I'm not sure airtight/watertight is the best goal. Leakproof, yes, but the trailer needs to breathe. All those respiring creatures exchanging moisture and such, showering, washing dishes, cooking. I guess I'm in the mental context of winter now, thinking of how little I would want to have open vents, except when using the catalytic heater. And, the area around the refrigerator (ammonia evaporator, venting combustion by-products up and out) must have fresh air flow. I'm just thinkin'...

Someone noted those little "eyebrow" vents airplanes have in the outer skin to permit airflow to pull moisture out without letting it in. Maybe Aerowood?

Anyway -- I'm in the thick of renovating, trying to learn from everyone. You get lots and lots of variety of opinion. I'm sorting through a lot of it, thus I zoomed in on your post.

Best of luck in your project!
Anne

Quote:
Anne I have used Produx closed cell foam and foil insulation. It does not retain water. I have gone a different approach to the belly and wraps. I have sealed everything up tight. The floor is totally waterproof with special paint used to make aquariums. The c channel is sealed to the floor top and bottom, all bolts and screws through the floor are sealed with the same rubber paint. The skins were sealed with vulkem between the c channel. The belly is sealed with vulkem at every seam and rivet. The side wraps and rivets are sealed with vulkem. The lower beltline and rivets are sealed with vulkem and then the top edges of all seams and trim is sealed with Parbond. All exterior openings are triple and sometimes quadruple sealed. Roof vents etc have butyl tape between component and shell then sealed with vulkem and then covered with Dicor lap sealant. Then I moved inside and sealed every seam, rivet and opening with vulkem. So far I have used about 15 tubes of vulkem and 6 tubes of Dicor and several rolls of Butyl and 4 small tubes of Parbond. It has taken a long time but I am sure that this trailer will not leak. Amazingly enough I found that the seam between the roof shell skin and the side wall skins were corroded and leaking even though the roof overlaps the sides water seemed to flow uphill and leak inside.
Spray foam while covering well is very time consuming to remove if repairs are needed and it will trap water from exiting. The old fiberglass insulation was excellent at keeping water in the belly. It acts like a sponge and absorbs the water and keeps it there to wick up into the floor and against the frame.[/QUOTE]
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Old 12-09-2010, 10:35 AM   #235
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Anne my thought were that in houses now they try to get it as air tight as possible so why not do the same on the trailer. If you can stop ant water getting into the belly from the shell and stop any road water from entering then it will stay dry. Only time will tell if my theory is correct. I'm sure plenty will chime in and tell me how wrong I am but at the end of the day it's my trailer and my choice. Yes for winter use opening a window or vent will be neccessary.
My use will be limited to Nov to Apr and plan to be somewhere warm like Texas or Arizona maybe So Cal and visit Inland Andy. I run a campground here and am onsite from Apr until Oct.
Thanks for the best wishes.
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Old 12-09-2010, 02:08 PM   #236
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Chris:
I buy what you are saying about keeping the water out from above and below the belly compartment. But is is true that you will need to let the cabin breath, especially while cooking or bathing.

Opening a window could do that, but what the latest homes do now, the ones that made themselves airtight, is to add a heat exchanger.

This could be done in a trailer, too, and could also be made to have an auto-close vent using the same kind of gravity vent that clothes dryers have, along with a fan that could be engaged based on a certain amount of humidity in the air, with a manual override (a switch).

The actual exchanger itself is just a fair-sized box that allows the outgoing air and incoming air to influence each other, while not mixing. Someone like you that can weld could bang a custom version of that box together quickly. The tough part might be finding where to mount it.

Have you thought about doing something like that?
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Old 12-09-2010, 02:45 PM   #237
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Aage no thoughts on air exchanger. I plan to use this trailer in warm climes with either open door and windows or running A/C. I don't as a rule cook I grill unless you count a microwave as cooking. LOL. I do on occasion bath LMAO and like in the home run the bathroom fan during and for a long while after to clear condensation.
P.S what happened to NED. I looked forward to new Ned's all the time.
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Old 12-09-2010, 02:49 PM   #238
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Greenovators I tried to PM you but you are blocking PM's. You have peaked my interest. What did you want to discuss?
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