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Old 08-25-2013, 08:39 PM   #29
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It's just tight. Take a screwdriver and tap the plunger in. The same thing happened the first time I tried to insert the blue coil hose. I suspect that the my dealer didn't relieve the pressure (or left the valve open) before popping the hose off.
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Old 09-26-2013, 05:00 AM   #30
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The most susceptible part of your system is your blue-and-white water hose. It will freeze before anything else. You have two choices: disconnect the hose before the temperature drops below freezing and bring it inside, or get a heated hose.

Thank you for ALL your posts; you are a saint for your kindnesses. So where is this "blue-and-white hose?" It's not the discharge hose. I'm 2014 silver extend. Steve Greene Kent CY
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Old 09-26-2013, 07:05 AM   #31
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Thank you for ALL your posts; you are a saint for your kindnesses. So where is this "blue-and-white hose?" It's not the discharge hose. I'm 2014 silver extend. Steve Greene Kent CY
It's a separate fresh water hose that you attach between the service pedestal and your municipal water intake. Being outside your Airstream, and above-ground, naturally it's more susceptible to freezing when you're camping in winter. When your Airstream is in storage, it's a moot point, because naturally you'll have drained the hose and stored it inside rather than leaving it hooked up.

Side note, fresh water hoses are blue-and-white for a reason. They are made of a lead-free plastic material that will not leach harmful chemicals into your drinking water. That color code is used in both the RV and maritime industries to mark hoses that are safe to carry drinking water.

Green or black garden hoses contain lead and phthalates that can leach into the water, especially if the hose lays in the sun and gets hot. Don't use them for drinking water.
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Old 10-01-2013, 02:15 PM   #32
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Blow out versus antifreeze

If I blow out the water lines, what do I need to do to the water pump and water heater ? Also what about the tanks ? Thanks
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:50 PM   #33
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First I'd recommend reading thru the winterizing procedure in the Airstream owner's manual. Personally I do all of that, close the low point drains, and then put some RV antifreeze in the fresh water tank and pump thru all of the lines except the HW heater which I have bypassed after draining. This puts some antifreeze in all of the lines and tanks. Also pump some thru the gray & black water into the drain hose. Then I open all of the low point drains again. Next Spring I drain and flush everything and we're good to go.

If you do elect to go the "blow out" route, be sure you don't exceed the maximum pressure. I don't remember what that is but I think it's in the manual.
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Old 10-02-2013, 06:12 AM   #34
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If you do elect to go the "blow out" route, be sure you don't exceed the maximum pressure. I don't remember what that is but I think it's in the manual.
The late-model manual says:
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After the water has stopped running, apply at least 60 lbs. of air pressure at the city water inlet.
Personally I wouldn't go much over 60psi. Compressed air— if used improperly— can hurt you. OSHA standards at 29 CFR 1926.302(b)(4) limit the use of compressed air for cleaning purposes to 30psi, and you'd be using at least double that for blowing out your water lines.
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