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Old 11-17-2013, 12:04 PM   #1
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"Winterize" in a mild Climate

today I looks like I will be winerizing Morrison ( yes my intersate has a name) for the first time. We have fairly mild winters in in the Northwet ( not a typo) but we can get the occasional over night low below freezing. So the questionin is how and where I should use antifreeze. I have the tools to use presureized air and then just pour some in the gray water and pump it out via the dump out. Draining the water heater is not really an issue. But can I get the fresh water tank empty enough with out having to get under the coach, I really dont have a place to do that and addd to that I am old and fat. And jut how bad does this stuff taste any way ? What do those of you that live in he more mild places do ? Protag?
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Old 11-17-2013, 12:13 PM   #2
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Having lived about 70 miles south of you for 18 years I would say winterize fully. I can remember 6 degree nights and frozen buried water pipes. Additionally, if you are using your RV on the road regularly through the winter, remember that when you are driving at 60 or 70, even if the air temperature isn't that low, (say 20 degrees, a fairly regular winter temperature in western Oregon), the wind chill factor will be very large. Don't risk burst pipes or water heater tank: for half an hour's work you'll have peace of mind.
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Old 11-17-2013, 12:34 PM   #3
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today I looks like I will be winerizing Morrison ( yes my intersate has a name) for the first time.
As in Jim?
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Originally Posted by bennu36 View Post
So the questionin is how and where I should use antifreeze.?
Where you really need the anitfreeze is in the plumbing lines which can freeze, expand and crack the lines.
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Old 11-17-2013, 02:03 PM   #4
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Better safe than sorry

For $1.99 buy the gallon or two of RV antifreeze and put in the time. It will save you hundreds and the stress of having a water line burst later on if the temperatures happen to drop. Your water heater should have a bypass valve on it so that you do not fill that with RV goop. Make sure to get the shower drain with the RV antifreeze. OR...you could just go south and spend time, some place warm and nice....for the winter.
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Old 11-17-2013, 03:09 PM   #5
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If your hot water heater has a Bypass Valve move it to the winter position. Drain the Hot water tank. If you do not have a winter bypass valve get on installed before you start or you will need 7 gallon of antifreeze after you have drained the hot water heater and closed it and still may not get a good job.

Use your air adapter to blow out all lines by opening one faucet, closest to the city input first, at a time, hot and cold side, till just droplet are showing. If you have a water filter remove the cartridge and put the winter cap on before blowing out the lines.

Disconnect the input line to the pump and with a tube in a gallon of anti freeze pump the antifreeze in. Open each faucet one at a time till antifreeze comes out. This includes the toilet and spray hose. Replace the input line to the pump.

Drain the water tank from the outside. You should be able to reach it without a lift.

Drain the gray and black tanks.

Put antifreeze in all traps. I use

In the spring just run water till the the pink is gone. Replace water filter cartridge.

Once the pik is out move the hot water heater valve to the normal position. Just crack it and let it fill or you will stir up the sediment on the bottom of the tank.

You may see a reduced water flow at some faucets. remove the screen and clean if necessary.
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Old 11-17-2013, 06:24 PM   #6
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wind chill and winterize

Sorry to say that wind chill for what I know only affects living-breathing people and animals. Inanimate objects are not affected by wind chill. If in doubt, Google it. So as long as the temp is above freezing even with 30 mph wind, the temp is still above freezing.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:01 PM   #7
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Sorry to say that wind chill for what I know only affects living-breathing people and animals. Inanimate objects are not affected by wind chill. If in doubt, Google it. So as long as the temp is above freezing even with 30 mph wind, the temp is still above freezing.
Don't be sorry! Google can provide you with any answer you wish, but in this case we only need to use a little common sense and experience:

Wind chill applied to humans is expressed as a "feels like" temperature. However, the actual effect that makes wind chill dangerous, and for you to be more likely to suffer from hypothermia at a given temperature if there is a significant wind than if there isn't, is the effect of increasing the rate of heat loss from your body. And this would be wind chill whether you "felt like" it was a certain temperature, or whether you were dead drunk lying on a street corner and unaware of what it felt like. So, for the OP's vehicle, as he drives along at 60 mph, say at a temperature of 20F, then the rate of cooling of his water pipes will be far greater than if he was parked.

I used the term wind chill simply because that is the least wordy way of putting it, as opposed to the long-drawn-out explanation above.

(And if you check back in my earlier post, you will see that 20F is the temperature I was using as an example.... nothing about it being above freezing.)
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Old 11-17-2013, 09:48 PM   #8
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I live in Birmingham Alabama - just picked up my new AS - trying to decide this as well - we get a few cold snap freezes in winter - Bit I want to camp in winter - guess I might just run the furnace if it gets cold - arrrr - not sure
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Old 11-17-2013, 10:46 PM   #9
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Same question. This is our first winter with an Airstream. We are in Austin and it never occurred to me that we would need to winterize. But we do get a few freezes every year...usually only into the 20s and no more than a couple of days in a row. Does that mean we need to winterize? I hope Pahaska responds to this regarding his experience. His is stored just down the row from ours.
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Old 11-18-2013, 06:00 AM   #10
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We on occasion experience dips below freezing when we are home in late October but not yet ready to shut down for a couple of months. Tanks are drained, never had any problem.

We are then fully winterized when the Interstate is in storage Nov-Jan 9-10 or so, fully de-winterizing once south.

We have camped in temperatures that dipped below freezing, and never had any problems within the Interstate.

The rule of thumb we have always heard is "if it is warm enough for you it is warm enough to keep things from freezing." That has always held true.

The important thing is to fill your tank and bring your hoses and filter in.


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Old 11-18-2013, 06:50 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by bennu36 View Post
today I looks like I will be winerizing Morrison ( yes my intersate has a name) for the first time. We have fairly mild winters in in the Northwet ( not a typo) but we can get the occasional over night low below freezing. So the questionin is how and where I should use antifreeze. I have the tools to use presureized air and then just pour some in the gray water and pump it out via the dump out. Draining the water heater is not really an issue. But can I get the fresh water tank empty enough with out having to get under the coach, I really dont have a place to do that and addd to that I am old and fat. And just how bad does this stuff taste any way ? What do those of you that live in he more mild places do ? Protag?
I have no sympathy for old and fat, being old and fat myself, with bad knees besides. You don't have to crawl underneath to drain the fresh tank, just lie down alongside and reach under, as long as you can position your head so you can see the plug.

Best way is run the water pump until it starts sucking air, which minimizes the amount of water you have to drain from the tank. I make it easy on myself, by running the exterior shower to drain the tank, so I don't have to make another trip to the dump station to empty a holding tank as I would if I ran the water into a sink or toilet. Then lie down on the ground (or better on a roll-around garage creeper, but I don't have one of those) and reach under to drain the tank. The tank plug is plastic, and easy to mess up, so use a socket set with six-sided, not twelve-sided, sockets. Because it's clean water, you can dump it anywhere. I do it in my apartment complex's parking lot, no problem.

Here's my plan for this winter… Check the 10-day extended forecast every Saturday morning on the Weather Channel's web page. If an overnight low is predicted to be below freezing any time during the coming week, I'll drain everything and blow out the lines.

If the daytime high is also predicted to be below freezing— or if the temperature is predicted to drop to below 27°F overnight— I'll add antifreeze to the holding tanks, and winterize the macerator pump and discharge hose (the black tank flush fitting will have already been blown out along with the fresh water system). Note that, since I'll have used the exterior shower to mostly drain the fresh tank, I'll need to blow out that fitting as well, so I'll need to leave the shower hose hooked up until I'm done. The hose itself doesn't need to be blown out, but my fitting can't be blown out unless the hose is attached, due to the design of the fitting.

So far I've never had to add antifreeze to the fresh water system; draining and thoroughly blowing out the lines has been good enough. So far. The pump itself is the mot vulnerable part, or at least the most expensive to fix and the hardest to blow dry with compressed air, so if I need to add antifreeze I'll do it with low-point drains open, so I don't need to pump water through the whole system, just from the pump to the first low-point drain. Doesn't matter if the antifreeze runs out the drain, as long as everything still wet inside the pump is antifreeze.
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Old 11-18-2013, 06:56 AM   #12
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today I looks like I will be winerizing Morrison ( yes my intersate has a name) for the first time.
It just now dawned on me. Van Morrison! Duh! Perfect name for an Interstate van!
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Old 11-18-2013, 08:05 AM   #13
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Two things:

1) It is correct that wind will cause warm inanimate objects to cool down faster. But it is also correct that unless you are trying to scoot from one warm environment to another, this doesn't matter. The water in your pipes and tanks will never get below the actual, thermometer-measured ambient temperature, wind or no. The laws of thermodynamics ensure this. There is no extra "wind chill" temperature drop.

2) FWIW: I live in a cold environment, and I have NEVER used antifreeze in the potable water system. Properly blowing out the system, draining all the tanks (including water heater, of course) and running the pump dry has always proven adequate, at least for me. The only place where antifreeze is necessary in in the drain traps, where a few cups are needed to displace the water.
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Old 11-18-2013, 08:30 AM   #14
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Two things:

1) It is correct that wind will cause warm inanimate objects to cool down faster.

2) FWIW: I live in a cold environment, and I have NEVER used antifreeze in the potable water system.
My two things:
1.Wind will increase heat loss through conductivity on anything. With a body you also have increased evaporation and cooling of moisture on the skin.

2.I'm sure you are right but I am a belt and suspenders man and will stick to the antifreeze for peace of mind.
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