Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-01-2015, 11:22 PM   #15
2 Rivet Member
 
tlundell's Avatar
 
2015 Interstate Ext. Coach
Los Gatos , California
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 63
Thank you everyone for your responses. My surge protector is on its way from Camping World.
__________________

__________________
Tim
2015 Interstate Grand Tour
WBCCI Member #5506
tlundell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2015, 02:02 PM   #16
4 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Rockwell , North Carolina
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 308
I am glad you posted this thread. I have surge protectors on my TV's, amps and computers at home but had not considered one for the motor home. I found the Progressive one on eBay and it is on the way.
__________________

jerhofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2015, 03:26 PM   #17
Rivet Master
 
Boxster1971's Avatar

 
2013 Interstate Coach
Fulton , Maryland
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 2,258
The main problems I've had is low voltages in campgrounds. My Progressive EMS protects me but then there is no power. Has anyone used a Hughes Autofomer to supplement low voltage conditions? Info at this web site.
https://www.hughesautoformers.com
__________________
- - Mike
--------------------------
2013 Airstream Interstate Lounge EXT
Boxster1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2015, 03:44 PM   #18
Storm Master
 
Ampman's Avatar
 
2005 25' Classic
Austin , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 164
Images: 3
I am a power line troubleshooter and have seen all manners of electrical mischief. When I first got our rig I checked out all of the electrical/electronic devices and determined that they were way too expensive not to at least try to protect them. I hard wired ours in. It may not protect against every type of fault but it's better than nothing. At home I use them on all devices and at the service entrance. When we leave for extended periods of time I unplug everything including the cable/phone line. Have not lost a single appliance or device. I'm the ultimate cheapskate but sometimes you have to spend money to save money.


Sent from my iPhone using Airstream Forums
__________________
Ampman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2015, 08:29 PM   #19
Rivet Master
 
InterBlog's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
League City , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 2,424
This topic was also discussed... I believe it was on the WDYGFYTT? thread where some actual surge protector models were cited by a few posters.

But the cited units were all in-line portable devices and so the obvious next question was, how do you prevent someone from getting a five-finger discount on your two or three hundred dollar surge protector (!) if you just leave it out there with your shore cable plugged into it?

Some folks gave me information on creative locking hacks and strategies to keep the thing a bit secure, but ultimately, my husband decided that he wanted a permanent unit mounted inside the Interstate rather than one that the line plugs into outdoors. That way the use of it would be automatic and we could just forget about it.

So I've attached the resulting money shot (literally; this one is about $180); it is mounted on the interior port side wall under the jack-knife couch between the furnace and the sub-woofer / wheel well.

Fair warning to anyone who goes the route of an interior unit - this particular product does make a faint humming sound. I don't think it will be very noticeable once the vehicle is packed with stuff, and it sure as hell won't be audible if we are running the a/c or even the furnace, but that hum might be a potential consideration for some folks. And also when the relay closes after its start-up wait period, it makes a one-time clunk sound.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1-DSC_0573.JPG
Views:	97
Size:	316.6 KB
ID:	233426  
__________________
InterBlog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2015, 11:10 PM   #20
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by InterBlog View Post
my husband decided that he wanted a permanent unit mounted inside the Interstate rather than one that the line plugs into outdoors. That way the use of it would be automatic and we could just forget about it
It's axiomatic that no surge protector is permanent. A surge protector stops damage from ONE surge and then needs to be either replaced (most) or serviced (some), depending on the make and model. That means you can't just forget about it. Check the owner's manual to find out how to tell if it's working properly and get in the habit of checking it every time you hook up and after every storm in your area.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2015, 11:43 PM   #21
Rivet Master
 
mefly2's Avatar
 
2015 25' FB Eddie Bauer
Western , ** Big Sky Country ** Montana
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 2,283
...padlock through chain and around the electric cable between the suppressor and the female receptacle ... chain goes around power pole...
__________________
mefly2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2015, 06:39 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
InterBlog's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
League City , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 2,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
It's axiomatic that no surge protector is permanent. A surge protector stops damage from ONE surge and then needs to be either replaced (most) or serviced (some), depending on the make and model. That means you can't just forget about it. Check the owner's manual to find out how to tell if it's working properly and get in the habit of checking it every time you hook up and after every storm in your area.
Semi-permanent perhaps? I've had one between this computer and the wall, and I haven't had to look at it for years. We recently replaced the refrigerator in our house-without-wheels, and one of the reasons for that costly affair was that the original was NOT on a surge protector and it got zapped to the point where its computer never did work properly again (thus the door thermometer would read 35F when the interior was actually something like 64F, if it even decided to produce a reading at all). Our new Kenmore is on a fancy surge protector designed for home theaters (word to the wise: get yourselves one if you value your fridge at all). But I hope not to have to look at that one for a few years either.

Checking the status of this one is easy - it has indicator lights on the front. My chief concern with this model is that it does not have a bypass switch. Therefore if it takes a hit to the point where it is kaput, we are going to have to yank it out and reconnect the line while on the road. That would be a time-consuming pain and it also requires not accidentally forgetting any tools or hardware.

This should be easier, methinks. Electrical issues are common enough and potentially catastrophic enough so that a protective solution should be more straightforward. I realize that some folks put individual appliances on individual surge protectors inside the vehicle, but that would not help with the roof a/c, furnace, Fantastic, TV, and probably a few other things.
__________________
InterBlog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2015, 10:23 PM   #23
cwf
Rivet Master
 
cwf's Avatar
 
1999 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Hillsboro , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,928
Images: 2
So I asked my self.....
"Self, what are the critical components in Mjolnir (Airstream)?"
"Self", I replied, "The critical items are AC unit(s), Microwave, Converter, TV and other 120VAC 'electronic' device you may plug in. So, I bought a couple of 'Surge protectors' which plug into the 120VAC outlet, then plug in my device(s)... Microwave, Converter, TV power supplies.

No, it doesn't 'cover' for 'Brown Outs'...
No, it doesn't 'stop' Surges entering Mjolnir's 120VAC wiring....or the AirConditioning unit itself..

So, I may need to consider a 'proper' one.. and it is probably best 'outside' because I can't figure where I would like to install it 'inside'... and, if there was a big lightning strike, I would like to stop it at the POLE if possible...
__________________
Peace and Blessings..
Channing
WBCCI# 30676
cwf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2015, 10:47 PM   #24
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by InterBlog View Post
Semi-permanent perhaps? I've had one between this computer and the wall, and I haven't had to look at it for years.
Are you sure? A surge protector that has stopped a surge will still pass current; it is not a circuit breaker. However, it will not stop a second surge.

This fact was driven home for me at work, where one of our field sites was constructed without lightning protection (decades ago, but until that site got computers it didn't matter as much). Equipment plugged into surge protectors would still be fried, because after the protector stopped one surge in a thunderstorm, it wouldn't stop another surge in a later thunderstorm. It got awfully expensive to replace surge protectors after every thunderstorm, but once we started replacing them that often the computers didn't get fried anymore.

So when you say you haven't had to look at it for years, that could just mean you haven't experienced a surge for years.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2015, 08:29 AM   #25
Rivet Master
 
InterBlog's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
League City , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 2,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
Are you sure? A surge protector that has stopped a surge will still pass current; it is not a circuit breaker. However, it will not stop a second surge.

This fact was driven home for me at work, where one of our field sites was constructed without lightning protection (decades ago, but until that site got computers it didn't matter as much). Equipment plugged into surge protectors would still be fried, because after the protector stopped one surge in a thunderstorm, it wouldn't stop another surge in a later thunderstorm. It got awfully expensive to replace surge protectors after every thunderstorm, but once we started replacing them that often the computers didn't get fried anymore.

So when you say you haven't had to look at it for years, that could just mean you haven't experienced a surge for years.
This is a good point and I'm going to have to do more research because there are multiple devices on the market and some of them may do things that others do not do.

When I mentioned having my computer on a "surge protector", it's a surge protector that is integrated into a fifty-pound UPS (because I also have my primary business computer plugged into it). I know that the UPS is still working, at least in part, because the stupid thing shrieks at me every time the house voltage drops below acceptable levels, a phenomenon that occurs about every other week for reasons that aren't clear. But how the surge protector is integrated into that and how it functions and whether or not it is still operating as designed... it should be verified.

We know we've taken bad surges because our refrigerator clearly got hit (it went on the fritz the day of a large storm) and smaller appliances often don't last long for us, especially robot vacuums that are in continual charge mode. It's Houston - severe electrical storms happen routinely during the summer months. I've never had a computer issue, knock wood, and I assumed it was because this lead-acid behemoth on my desk was continuing to do its integrated job. I will have to look more carefully at it, though. This task hereby goes on the proverbial punch list.
__________________
InterBlog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2015, 08:47 AM   #26
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by InterBlog View Post
When I mentioned having my computer on a "surge protector", it's a surge protector that is integrated into a fifty-pound UPS (because I also have my primary business computer plugged into it). I know that the UPS is still working, at least in part, because the stupid thing shrieks at me every time the house voltage drops below acceptable levels, a phenomenon that occurs about every other week for reasons that aren't clear. But how the surge protector is integrated into that and how it functions and whether or not it is still operating as designed... it should be verified.
Which brings up another point, and I thank you for mentioning it so I can once again do what I do best, which is to be unnecessarily pedanticÖ Surge protectors protect against overcurrent, surges. They don't necessarily protect against undercurrent, brownouts. Your UPS does protect against brownouts as well as surges. So it's entirely possible that your other computer-chipped appliances were damaged by brownouts, not surges.

That shouldn't be a problem in an Airstream Interstate, because the Energy Management System has a load-shedding routine that shuts off circuits in a specific order if there isn't enough juice to keep them running. I haven't actually tested it in brownout conditions, so I'm just speculating, but still it's a feature your home wiring doesn't have.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2015, 07:01 AM   #27
Rivet Master
 
InterBlog's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
League City , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 2,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
Which brings up another point, and I thank you for mentioning it so I can once again do what I do best, which is to be unnecessarily pedanticÖ Surge protectors protect against overcurrent, surges. They don't necessarily protect against undercurrent, brownouts. Your UPS does protect against brownouts as well as surges. So it's entirely possible that your other computer-chipped appliances were damaged by brownouts, not surges.

That shouldn't be a problem in an Airstream Interstate, because the Energy Management System has a load-shedding routine that shuts off circuits in a specific order if there isn't enough juice to keep them running. I haven't actually tested it in brownout conditions, so I'm just speculating, but still it's a feature your home wiring doesn't have.
Energy Management System... another item for me to research. My husband and I are part way through watching the 2015 Interstate training vid on the other thread, and when we got to the part about the electrical system, we asked ourselves, "Does ours have that feature?" and the answer was, "Well, I think it might have some earlier version of that feature". In fact, I'm not entirely sure what it has. Yet.

I had assumed, perhaps incorrectly, that most surge protectors are sacrificial. This is almost a rite of passage in Houston: there's a big t-storm, you get home from work later that day, and half the devices in your house will no longer turn on. You end up chunking multiple surge strips that upon inspection prove to be dead, presumably because they got fried. Your small appliances and electronics still work, but you need a new set of surge protectors to plug them into. Been there, done that.

I've had two houses impacted by close lightning strikes. Destroyed the coax cables in each. And activated a lot of my daughter's battery-operated toys, which began playing music and marching around spontaneously. Very eerie.
__________________
InterBlog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2015, 04:57 PM   #28
Rivet Master
 
73shark's Avatar
 
2011 Interstate Coach
Overland Park , Kansas
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,748
The EMS is the component that (at least on mine) shows the AC current draw and the circuits and sheds loads as the current approaches 20 or 30 amps depending upon the supply capacity.
__________________

__________________
Glass half full or half empty to an engineer is the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

PM me for sale info on my 2011. SOLD!
Upfitted Transit 350 sitting in driveway.
73shark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I'm new. Need for surge protector? bcombs Member Introductions 14 11-09-2013 08:47 AM
1968 - Progressive Ind. 30 amp surge protector? Randy Gates 1965 - 1969 Globetrotter 13 10-17-2011 02:35 PM
Room for in-line surge protector in 23' Intl? Hoonanea Electrical - Systems, Generators, Batteries & Solar 0 10-03-2011 12:07 PM
Loud Humming Noise from Surge Protector Michigander Land Yacht/Legacy Motorhomes 8 07-23-2011 04:56 AM
surge protector pip8688 Batteries, Univolts, Converters & Inverters 15 08-09-2010 06:14 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.