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Old 03-28-2015, 07:28 AM   #15
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So...what do you do with the old fluid? How do you dispose of it properly?

I wonder if this "watery brake fluid" could also contribute to brake lines rotting out. Certainly, living in the snow/salt belt is a major contributor to that, but just wondering if this accelerates the process.
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Old 03-28-2015, 08:14 AM   #16
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I take my used fluids to the business that does my oil changes. Just took about 7 gallons of tranny fluid there a couple days ago. No charge. I think its a chain called Speed Lube.
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Old 03-28-2015, 06:37 PM   #17
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I mean really, it seems to me that a brake system will be exposed to the atmosphere to a greater extent in a single bleeding event than it will be for years and years of normal service and regular topping off.
It is exposed to air and moisture every time the cap is taken off. After 11 years, I would have the fluid changed.

Usually it happens when the calipers are looked at. If all that has been done is changing pads, that isn't a brake job, it is just changing pads. My $0.02
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Old 03-29-2015, 10:04 AM   #18
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Original fluid in my o4 Tahoe and my o8 Silverado, original everything else but pads.

I am not saying that any person shouldn't change their fluid, but fact is, the brake system is sealed from the air, so it should not pick up water.

Maybe the manufacturers might recommend changing the fluid more to cover their own donkey than to protect us?

I wonder how much a dealer charges for changing brake fluid?

I mean really, it seems to me that a brake system will be exposed to the atmosphere to a greater extent in a single bleeding event than it will be for years and years of normal service and regular topping off.


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The brake syeem is NOT sealed from air.they all have vented master cylinders
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Old 03-29-2015, 10:09 AM   #19
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I take my used fluids to the business that does my oil changes. Just took about 7 gallons of tranny fluid there a couple days ago. No charge. I think its a chain called Speed Lube.
so....you pay someone to change your engine oil, but you do your own tranny and brake fluid changes? what's up with that?
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Old 03-29-2015, 10:34 AM   #20
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The brake syeem is NOT sealed from air.they all have vented master cylinders
Pre ABS brakes on GM vehicles are not vented. They had a bellows gasket that was allowed to change shape to allow for the decreasing volume in the master cylinder as the pads wear. Haven't checked my current GM vehicle w/ ABS.
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:22 AM   #21
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As a mechanic who is ASE certified in brakes (among other things) the post early on in this thread are correct. Brake fluid absorbs moisture from the atmosphere. This leads to corrosion in the brake system. And lowered boiling pint. There is a test that can be done to check the brake fluid. It's a strip that is dipped in the reservoir and essential checks the copper levels in the fluid as an indication of corrosion occurring due to moisture in the fluid. Compare the color of the strip to the chart on the bottle. Most mechanics con perform this test. I'm sure you can buy the test strips online as well.
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Old 03-29-2015, 03:15 PM   #22
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If you want to do this project yourself you need to buy one of these.

Mityvac Hand Vacuum Pump Kits

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Mityvac-MV802...-/140538534873

I have the cheapest on that is just a hand pump without gauge. This way you can drain the brake fluid into the container under the pump and see what condition the fluid is.
Just place wrench on bleeder, start pumping to create vacuum, open bleeder and continue pumping, shutting off bleeder once you have pumped out an amount of fluid that is smaller than your reservoir. Just remember to remove old brake fluid in reservoir BEFORE adding new fluid to reservoir and then drain lines; that way new fluid is instantly going into the system.

I just did my 07 Altima this afternoon and just love my pump, as you're not yelling.....RELEASE, PUMP, HOLD....repeat a hundred times.

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Old 09-21-2017, 07:08 PM   #23
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Iron is porous

[QUOTE=J.I am not saying that any person shouldn't change their fluid, but fact is, the brake system is sealed from the air, so it should not pick up water.

I mean really, it seems to me that a brake system will be exposed to the atmosphere to a greater extent in a single bleeding event than it will be for years and years of normal service and regular topping off.
[/QUOTE]

~40 years ago I discovered Castrol L(ow)M(oisture)A(bsorption) when I was SCCA road racing. Braking from high speeds, you quickly realized you needed every edge & flushing brake fluid was a known positive because of the hygroscopic nature of brake fluid. Castrol LMA is still the only brake fluid I use.

Bought a state fleet 3/4 ton Dodge that had been out of service for over a year. It seemed to need nothing mechanically, so I planned on driving it the 50 miles home. Wound up driving slower & slower. The brake fluid contained so much water as I applied the brakes the fluid got hotter, turning the water to steam. Steam is not compressible, the calipers weren't releasing & got tighter & tighter until I finally had to open the front bleed screws, releasing steam & scalding water/brake fluid. LESSON LEARNED!
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Old 09-21-2017, 07:23 PM   #24
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Does anyone use Silicone brake fluid? I do not think it absorbs water.
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Old 09-22-2017, 06:46 AM   #25
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A note for T1N Sprinter owners... the manual clearly says "every 2 years" (on page 300 of the 2006 edition). I'm scratching my head wondering why MB didn't recommend that to me when I just had them change the transmission fluid about four weeks ago.
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Old 09-22-2017, 07:20 AM   #26
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Steam is not compressible
On the contrary, steam is VERY compressible, just like all vapors. But like all gases under pressure, it wants to expand, and it will expand in every direction it's allowed to, in this case toward the brake calipers.

Just a minor quibble. Your explanation makes perfect sense otherwise.
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:03 AM   #27
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Does anyone use Silicone brake fluid? I do not think it absorbs water.
Not me. Silicone fluid has its own issues. It absorbs air, leading to a spongy pedal. It can be harder to bleed the system. And changing to silicone fluid should be done after a full system rebuild, since you shouldn't mix the fluids.

It is a good choice for a show car where performance doesn't matter but paint stripping ability can be a problem.
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Old 09-22-2017, 09:45 AM   #28
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It has always been recommended (by most) to change brake fluid every two years. Ever since I can remember.

Not only will the moisture cause fading issues, it can also cause corrosion issues.
Some manufacturers recommended changes the flexible hoses every two years also. Iíve seen them fail internally myself several times- sometimes acting like a one-way valve pumping the brakes up and holding them on.
Certainly best if the ABS pump is cycled, but even if not, at least MOST of the fluid would be new.

Change should be done with hydraulic clutches also (unless they use mineral oil, which some motorcycles use).

I have not done the AI- but I need to get on that soon!

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