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Old 08-08-2013, 08:39 AM   #1
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melrose , Massachusetts
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newbie interstate owner

we are taking delivery of our new interstate at the end of this month.
since we are total novices we would appreciate any and all tips and advice from experienced owners - thanks
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:01 AM   #2
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we are taking delivery of our new interstate at the end of this month.
since we are total novices we would appreciate any and all tips and advice from experienced owners - thanks
Welcome to the AirForums! And Welcome to the wonderful world of Interstate ownership! You have joined an elite and exalted group.

First advice: The big greenhouse windshield lets in a lot of heat, and the privacy curtain that comes with an Interstate does nothing to keep the heat out. Invest in a good-quality windshield and front window sunshade set. Outside Vans makes one, that a fellow Interstate owner told us about, that is very easy to use, and seems to be pretty effective. Pricy, though. There are less-expensive options from the Sprinter Store and Eurocampers.
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:25 AM   #3
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Congratulations on the new RV!

Before delivery, thoroughly inspect inside and out. It will be new and shiny, but take your time and be sure everything works. Don't be intimidated-tell the dealer to give you some time alone checking out the rig. If you find anything amiss make them fix it before you close the deal. Then take it for a trip and check everything out thoroughly again. In most new RV's a few things may need fixing that didn't get done correctly at the factory that won't become apparent until you spend some time in it. At least in my unit, fit and finish left a lot to be desired and many minor and a few major things required fixing.

I agree with Protagonist. Get some windshield covers as the ones Airstream uses are pretty worthless. Bedding is another consideration with different options.

Check out insurance. Insuring RV's is different than cars. I have Geico and am quite happy with the coverage, which is full replacement for the first five years or full payment of the purchase price if it can't be replaced (this is typical for RV coverage and how it differs from a standard auto policy). Geico was less than Progressive or AAA and customer support has been great to deal with (although I've never had a claim).

Then use it as much as you can. It will depreciate like crazy just sitting around so you may as well get some enjoyment out of it in the meantime!


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Originally Posted by jennian View Post
we are taking delivery of our new interstate at the end of this month.
since we are total novices we would appreciate any and all tips and advice from experienced owners - thanks
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:16 AM   #4
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Greetings from the Florida Panhandle

Welcome to the Forums. We're glad to have you with us. Congratulations on your new baby. We would love to see some pictures.
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:56 AM   #5
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Check out insurance. Insuring RV's is different than cars. I have Geico and am quite happy with the coverage, which is full replacement for the first five years or full payment of the purchase price if it can't be replaced (this is typical for RV coverage and how it differs from a standard auto policy). Geico was less than Progressive or AAA and customer support has been great to deal with (although I've never had a claim).
On the subject of insurance, who is cheapest and who offers the best coverage will vary from state to state. But it can be worth your while to join Good Sam Club before getting your insurance. In my case (Louisiana), I got quotes both with and without Good Sam discounts. I ended up getting GMAC insurance, but using the Progressive quotes as an example, the difference between the quote with Good Sam and without Good Sam was a whopping $400 per year, all for the price of a $25 per year membership! Even if I never use any of the other club benefits, the membership has paid for itself many times over.

But since we don't want this to become yet another insurance thread, my next piece of advice is, during your walk-through, don't forget to concentrate on the drivetrain. RV dealers often mistakenly believe that an RV is all about the "house" systems, and they forget that it's a motor vehicle, with all of the normal motor vehicle concerns. For example, they may not tell you about the pause between turning the key and starting the engine, to allow the glow plugs to warm up, and if you've never driven a diesel before, that's the kind of thing you need to know. So by all means, pop the hood and find out where all the dipsticks are, where the fluids get added, and all that stuff.

To illustrate my experience, let me use a non-Airstream dealer, because I also looked at Winnebago Era and Roadtrek Adventurous before settling on the Interstate. At one Winnebago dealer (who will remain nameless to save them even more embarrassment), the salesman didn't know where the spare tire was located, and couldn't even open the hood because he didn't know where the inside release lever was located! But he could tell me all about the galley and the convertible sofa/lounge (which wasn't half as good as Airstream's, by the way). He later told me that I was the very first customer he'd ever had who took the time to lie on the ground and look underneath to find out where the spare tire, generator, and the various tanks were.
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Old 08-08-2013, 03:18 PM   #6
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Protagonist,

No pause is required for the MB Sprinter. You can start it up just like a gasoline engine. It's not like the old days you have to warm up the glow plugs.

I never pause before starting and never had a problem with it starting right up. I think they must have improved the design so there is no need to pause anymore. I specifically asked the dealer and he said the same thing.

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... For example, they may not tell you about the pause between turning the key and starting the engine, to allow the glow plugs to warm up, and if you've never driven a diesel before, that's the kind of thing you need to know. ...
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Old 08-08-2013, 04:23 PM   #7
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No pause is required for the MB Sprinter. You can start it up just like a gasoline engine. It's not like the old days you have to warm up the glow plugs.
That is not what my Sprinter Operator's Manual says. Page 110, Starting the Engine:
Quote:
Turn the Key to Position 2 in the ignition lock.
The preglow indicator lamp in the instrument cluster lights up.
When the preglow indicator lamp goes out, turn the key to Position 3 in the ignition lock and release as soon as the engine is running.
They call it "preglow" but it's the same thing. In the summer, the wait is a second or two; in the winter, even a New Orleans winter, the wait can be closer to a minute.
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:46 PM   #8
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I stand corrected. Thanks for the correction.

If all else fails, read the instructions!

GM

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That is not what my Sprinter Operator's Manual says. Page 110, Starting the Engine:


They call it "preglow" but it's the same thing. In the summer, the wait is a second or two; in the winter, even a New Orleans winter, the wait can be closer to a minute.
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Old 08-09-2013, 09:40 AM   #9
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I'm with Gerald. I have never seen the pre glow indicator on the instrument panel light, even in the winter. And I did read the owners manual and noticed what it said.

For the other person, be sure to take it for a test drive on some relatively rough pavement and listen for any interior noises.
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Old 08-10-2013, 11:27 PM   #10
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Los Gatos , California
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On my 2102 EXT, I certainly have the 'glow plug indicator'. The wait for it is usually less than a second. Even in the cold conditions of the high Sierra, it has never taken more than 5 seconds. If I forget to wait, the beast still starts up; I just don't know if it is harmful at all. My 'fix' is to get in, turn the key to the first position, put on my seatbelt, then turn the key to start the engine. That always seems to allow adequate time for the light to go out.

BTW, welcome to the forum. This is a great resource to have and I appreciate everyone's contributions and efforts. We absolutely love our rig; even with the quirks and some minor quality issues.
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