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Old 03-20-2016, 06:17 PM   #1
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Loose screws and thread locker

NOT looking to start another airstream quality thread, just need some advice. Our 2011 had numerous screws working loose that I tightened today. Mostly the small black screws that fasten the cabinet liners, the white ones that secure the cabinet door hinges, and the big ones inside the overhead cab storage compartment. After tightening 25+ screws, it occurred to me that they will work lose again with normal vibration. Is there any reason why I couldn't use a low strength thread locker fluid to keep them in "permanently"? Thanks
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Old 03-20-2016, 06:31 PM   #2
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I do not use thread locker on interior fittings. Occasionally I make the rounds inside and out with a Phillips screwdriver in hand. Part of my preventative maintenance and mental health program. Can always find a couple of screws that need a twist.
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Old 03-20-2016, 06:46 PM   #3
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Thumbs up Welcome Aboard....

WOOD SCREWS???

I have used Elmers white glue and toothpicks to re-secure loose wood screws, Marine-Tex with T-pics to repair completely stripped WS's. I recently used Gorilla Glue and pic's to repair a stripped kitchen cabinet door....seems to work very well, POI....a little goes a long way.

I have not removed any repaired screw...

Bob



DIY Mag....
"Use Wood Toothpicks"

"Use wood toothpicks to repair a stripped screw hole is our preferred method when a longer screw doesn’t address the issue.
Using wood toothpicks, cut the toothpick to length for the given screw depth. (i) Add at least two toothpicks, with the tapered points facing out, if applicable. The taper allows the screw to have an easier starting point.
IMPORTANT: Fill the hole with wood glue. (i) This step is very crucial in bonding the wood pieces together. When re-inserting the screw you will be grinding the wood filler pieces into fragments. Without the glue as a bonding agent, you will just create loose sawdust and have nothing for the screw to attach itself to. Wood glue from: Titebond (original red label is fine), Elmers, or Gorilla, will all work fine.
Add the splinters of wood or toothpicks.
Re-insert the screw before the glue sets up. (i) Tighten the screw by hand to avoid over tightening. (ii) Note: The glue will not adhere to the metal screw; causing it to seal into the hole. You will be able to remove the screw once the glue is dry, and the wood has adhered.
Follow the glue manufacturers dry time instructions.
Once the glue has dried, you may adjust the screws torque if necessary. The screw should be able to be removed, and re-installed, without issue."
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Old 03-20-2016, 08:23 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by BurntAsphalt View Post
Is there any reason why I couldn't use a low strength thread locker fluid to keep them in "permanently"? Thanks
Short answer - no. Toothpick and glue are good fixes for when the wood threads have stripped tho. Since you probably already have some glue, it would probably work as well as Loctite and be a lot cheaper.

IIRC, most thread-lockers are anaerobic and might not cure in wood anyway.
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Old 03-20-2016, 08:50 PM   #5
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An even better fix is golf tee's instead of toothpicks for larger screws. Be very careful using Gorilla glue as activists are starting to call for boycotts of hardware stores that carry the product. Do you even know how many gorilla's are killed every year to make tape and glue?
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Old 03-20-2016, 09:10 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by BurntAsphalt View Post
NOT looking to start another airstream quality thread, just need some advice. Our 2011 had numerous screws working loose that I tightened today. Mostly the small black screws that fasten the cabinet liners, the white ones that secure the cabinet door hinges, and the big ones inside the overhead cab storage compartment. After tightening 25+ screws, it occurred to me that they will work lose again with normal vibration. Is there any reason why I couldn't use a low strength thread locker fluid to keep them in "permanently"? Thanks
I don't think you want to use the thread locker on wood based cabinets, it probably wont work as 73shark pointed out.

I have had one upper cabinet door come off when I opened it and another came off due to a load shift as I made a sharp corner. I discovered most of the screws holding those cabinet door are too short. I think most of mine were 1/2" or 5/8" long. I changed them all to 3/4" length and applied Gorilla glue to keep them tight. That was two years ago and they have not come loose since.

I often use Gorilla glue, a polyurethane waterproof glue, to keep screws tight in wood. It seems to work well because the glue expands as it dries and makes the screws tight. It also helps to make the screw and wood a little wet with water as it speeds the cure of Gorilla glue. It also comes in two colors, light and dark.

Hope this helps,
- - Mike
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Old 03-20-2016, 09:36 PM   #7
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Thanks for all the excellent suggestions. The collective wisdom of Airforums never ceases to amaze me!
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Old 03-20-2016, 11:20 PM   #8
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An even better fix is golf tee's instead of toothpicks for larger screws. Be very careful using Gorilla glue as activists are starting to call for boycotts of hardware stores that carry the product. Do you even know how many gorilla's are killed every year to make tape and glue?

And let's NOT talk about 'baby oil' in polite company either....😉
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Old 03-21-2016, 01:43 PM   #9
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I was an engineer for Loctite back in the early 90's and worked a lot with anaerobic adhesives. They should not be used on any substrate other than metal or they will probably not work. They cure in the absence of air and the presence of metal. I would recommend the low strength thread locker for applications where you have fasteners working loose metal on metal It's easy to disassemble but won't allow vibration to rattle them apart. Wood glue and toothpicks are a good option for wood screws.
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Old 03-21-2016, 02:59 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robert cross View Post
wood screws???

I have used elmers white glue and toothpicks to re-secure loose wood screws, marine-tex with t-pics to repair completely stripped ws's. I recently used gorilla glue and pic's to repair a stripped kitchen cabinet door....seems to work very well, poi....a little goes a long way.

I have not removed any repaired screw...

Bob



Diy mag....
"use wood toothpicks"

"use wood toothpicks to repair a stripped screw hole is our preferred method when a longer screw doesn’t address the issue.
Using wood toothpicks, cut the toothpick to length for the given screw depth. (i) add at least two toothpicks, with the tapered points facing out, if applicable. The taper allows the screw to have an easier starting point.
Important: Fill the hole with wood glue. (i) this step is very crucial in bonding the wood pieces together. When re-inserting the screw you will be grinding the wood filler pieces into fragments. Without the glue as a bonding agent, you will just create loose sawdust and have nothing for the screw to attach itself to. Wood glue from: Titebond (original red label is fine), elmers, or gorilla, will all work fine.
Add the splinters of wood or toothpicks.
Re-insert the screw before the glue sets up. (i) tighten the screw by hand to avoid over tightening. (ii) note: The glue will not adhere to the metal screw; causing it to seal into the hole. You will be able to remove the screw once the glue is dry, and the wood has adhered.
Follow the glue manufacturers dry time instructions.
Once the glue has dried, you may adjust the screws torque if necessary. The screw should be able to be removed, and re-installed, without issue."

ditto!:d
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Old 03-21-2016, 03:02 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BurntAsphalt View Post
NOT looking to start another airstream quality thread, just need some advice. Our 2011 had numerous screws working loose that I tightened today. Mostly the small black screws that fasten the cabinet liners, the white ones that secure the cabinet door hinges, and the big ones inside the overhead cab storage compartment. After tightening 25+ screws, it occurred to me that they will work lose again with normal vibration. Is there any reason why I couldn't use a low strength thread locker fluid to keep them in "permanently"? Thanks
Always a good idea to ask for advice when not sure.
There are some good ideas in this thread.
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Old 03-21-2016, 04:53 PM   #12
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Haven't found a loose screw on my old 1989 AS (except for the rotted floor part, not loose, just no OSB left to attach to, LOL). However, if you have continued issues with things loosening up, you might want to take a look at your suspension. If you had one or two loose screws that is one thing but twenty-five might be something more. Hope that is not the case but something to think about. I agree with the suggestions for a fix though. Good Luck
Regards,
JDB
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Old 03-21-2016, 07:08 PM   #13
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For metal thread applications where you don't want a tight bond, I use a product called Vibratite. It keeps all sizes of fasteners in place. It does not harden so works well for fasteners that are removed and replaced.

David
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Old 03-22-2016, 12:26 AM   #14
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And let's NOT talk about 'baby oil' in polite company either....😉
Not to mention "duck" tape....
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