Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-20-2015, 10:24 AM   #533
4 Rivet Member
 
Teamaron's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
2014 Interstate Ext. Coach
Boca Raton , Florida
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben322 View Post
I have a similar setup to Lew, (26" 120W Single Row LED), but mounted it on the top so I could still get my foot there to clean the windshield.

Can you show an ON picture?



Sent from my iPhone using Airstream Forums
__________________

__________________
Teamaron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 10:42 AM   #534
2 Rivet Member
 
2004 22' Interstate
Davis , California
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 44
I guess if you blind an oncoming car that has blinded you with high beams then you're both blind. Sounds like an accident waiting to happen.
__________________

__________________
DavisBurns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 11:29 PM   #535
2 Rivet Member
 
gambita's Avatar
 
2015 Interstate Ext. Coach
Framingham , Massachusetts
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 57
LED Light bar was helpful (to us) when we drove one night going camping in New Hampshire . The road was dark, no street lights.
I turn on the LED when there is no incoming traffic in the opposite side,
Otherwise it will surely blind the other driver Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByAirstream Forums1434860933.388071.jpg
Views:	129
Size:	148.1 KB
ID:	241203
__________________
gambita is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 11:42 PM   #536
Rivet Master
Commercial Member
 
lewster's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
Naples, FL , Hood River, OR
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 7,002
Quote:
Originally Posted by gambita View Post
LED Light bar was helpful (to us) when we drove one night going camping in New Hampshire . The road was dark, no street lights.
I turn on the LED when there is no incoming traffic in the opposite side,
Otherwise it will surely blind the other driver Attachment 241203
EXACTLY!

Being a respectful driver (contrary to what some comments on this thread would lead one to believe), I only use the LED bar (and the HID high beams) when no oncoming traffic is in view, and immediately extinguish it (along with the high beams) at the first sight of oncoming light from the opposite direction or red tail lights in my travel direction

It's not only disrespectful, but also illegal to leave your high beams on when other drivers are present, regardless if they are traveling in the same or opposite direction!!!

Those that choose to ignore the courtesy (and the law) get a quick reminder! But sorry to say, most do nothing and are otherwise totally oblivious!!!!
__________________
Lew Farber...RVIA Certified Master Tech...ABYC Certified Master Marine Electrician
SOLAR TECH ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC.
AM SOLAR ...MAGNUM…VICTRON ENERGY...LITHIUM & LIFELINE BATTERIESMARINE REFRIGERATION
lewster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2015, 06:01 AM   #537
3 Rivet Member
 
ben322's Avatar
 
2009 Interstate
Bethesda , Maryland
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teamaron View Post
Can you show an ON picture?
I don't have a picture with it on because it's really bright and washes out the picture unless I could be back further off angle. I installed it primarily for fog, (like I68/I70 near WV which can be really bad at night), but it's also good for those pitch black back roads when we're breaking camp early.

The factory fogs could be modified for double duty by taking the inner shield out and using a high power LED but the reflector is small so your long distance light would mainly be from the front mounted LED. The light bar has 18 driving and 6 fog LED's so it's a nice addition when no ones in front of you.
__________________
2009 Airstream Interstate
ben322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2015, 07:44 AM   #538
2 Rivet Member
 
gambita's Avatar
 
2015 Interstate Ext. Coach
Framingham , Massachusetts
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mjgman View Post
What is the light bar for?

Sorry for the late reply.
LED light bar will be helpful when driving in very dark areas , it will light up your path like daylight 😁.
Caution : it will blind the other driver driving opposite your lane.
I use it in campsite or when driving locally ( when no other vehicle opposite you on the road)
Sometimes I use it as daytime running lights when raining.
__________________
gambita is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2015, 07:57 AM   #539
2 Rivet Member
 
gambita's Avatar
 
2015 Interstate Ext. Coach
Framingham , Massachusetts
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
Not really true— a Corvette has a relatively large grille opening— underneath the nose of the car.



Given the location of the light bar, I'd be more concerned with blocking airflow to the transmission oil cooler, if the van has one.

So far , no transmission/ overheating/ cooling problem after driving more than 3,000miles. There is still airflow
in the transmission grill as the LED
is not tight fit.
I have 2 LED light bars (for off roading&#128513 on the Ford Raptor behind the grill and its been fine. Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByAirstream Forums1434891212.127301.jpg
Views:	126
Size:	99.6 KB
ID:	241217
__________________
gambita is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2015, 12:52 PM   #540
Rivet Master
 
InterBlog's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
League City , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,465
Interesting that several folks have felt it necessary to augment the lighting on newer Interstates, which already have projector headlights. I would have assumed those to be sufficient for almost any scenario.

We are working on retrofitting projectors on our 2007 because the old technology just doesn't cut it. This issue has come up on older threads, but one of our biggest driving risk factors in the deep south is concrete blow-outs (to use TxDOT's somewhat contentious term), which can develop very rapidly when the concrete simply shatters and collapses into a R.O.W. abyss (they are like potholes on steroids). I can't see those with the OEM T1N Sprinter headlights, and they are a real threat. Yesterday on social media, there was a great gnashing of teeth over a local blow-out that reportedly shredded three of four tires on one driver's car, and flattened individual tires on many others. If I ever hit a big one like that in the Interstate with its delicate underbelly, there is no telling how much damage would result. I'm hoping that the projector retrofit will help to illuminate them sufficiently, because I couldn't use an LED light bar in the city.
__________________
InterBlog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2015, 02:51 AM   #541
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
Metairie , Louisiana
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 9,089
Quote:
Originally Posted by InterBlog View Post
This issue has come up on older threads, but one of our biggest driving risk factors in the deep south is concrete blow-outs (to use TxDOT's somewhat contentious term), which can develop very rapidly when the concrete simply shatters and collapses into a R.O.W. abyss (they are like potholes on steroids).
The engineering term is "spalling." The most common cause is freeze/thaw cycles in most of the country but in the southern states it's caused by rusting of the rebar; iron oxide is larger molecule than iron so rust causes the steel rebar to swell. Except that when it's encased in concrete there's no room for it to swell. So the concrete fractures to make room.
__________________
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2015, 01:39 PM   #542
2 Rivet Member
 
2004 22' Interstate
Davis , California
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 44
The original post did not make it clear the additional lights were only used when there was no other traffic. In fact there was a comment that you could blind an oncoming driver who didn't dim their lights. Maybe that was a warning NOT to use them when there was other traffic but that wasn't clear.

Can I just add that some people want their campsites to be dark because they like the night sky so keeping lights low or off after setup is a courtesy to other campers. Many of us don't enjoy the "festive" party lights hung on awnings and other attempts to light up the night. Of course, it's a rare rv park that isn't overlit to begin with.
__________________
DavisBurns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2015, 04:01 PM   #543
Rivet Master
 
73shark's Avatar
 
2011 Interstate Coach
Overland Park , Kansas
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
The engineering term is "spalling." The most common cause is freeze/thaw cycles in most of the country but in the southern states it's caused by rusting of the rebar; iron oxide is larger molecule than iron so rust causes the steel rebar to swell. Except that when it's encased in concrete there's no room for it to swell. So the concrete fractures to make room.
I'll bet that's why most new highway construction using concrete and rebar uses epoxy coated rebar.
__________________
73shark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2015, 04:28 PM   #544
4 Rivet Member
 
2011 Interstate Coach
Muskogee , Oklahoma
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 386
And now for something completely different... .

A modification I did this weekend is probably the least glamorous and most useful I've done so far.

I modified the sewer connection to the macerator so I can use a twist off connector as the attachment shows.

Why? A bit of history may help explain the reason.

I have to keep my van outside all year. The first year winter season, I winterized the van by using antifreeze, including the waste tanks, until pink ran out the hose. Or more like pink frothy stuff because it never would turn red like it would from the faucet. I figured that was good enough. And the first year, which was mild, it was.

The second year, no so much. After a hard freeze, and thaw, I noticed liquid slowly leaking from the macerator. Why? Because even though I had attempted to empty the tanks and then use antifreeze, the much harsher winter caused it to freeze. Or, perhaps, the seal was damaged. No matter, it had to be replaced. Airstream would replace it under warranty, they said, if it was not related to freeze damage, which of course, it was, because of the poor design of the sewer system itself.

When I unhooked the sewer hose, I was astonished to see how much liquid came pouring out-at least 3 or more gallons. My guess, is the plumbing can hold maybe 5 gallons or more. Why? Because Airstream put the pump level with the sewer pipe so it won't be able to pump the liquid after the pipe is about half empty-it can't pump air. It just sits there and makes a nice froth instead. To winterize it would probably take 20 gallons of antifreeze, if it could be done at all, depending on how much protection is needed.

So, I was left with the unpleasant prospect of unhooking the 12" black sewer hose to winterize it every year. And that's a pain to do.

So, I replaced the 3" black hose with one of these:

Fernco. PQT-300 3 in. Flex Quick Tee - - Amazon.com

(Lowe's carries it as well), and one of these:

Amazon.com: Valterra Products, Inc. T1020-VP 3" Black Carded Termination Cap with Bayonet Hook: Automotive

That also gave me an option to use a standard gravity type twist on hose if I want to stay awhile at one location rather than dump every day. Or if the macerator fails as a backup.

The modification was not too difficult. But you will need about a 2.5" pieice of 3" hose. I found a local supplier that sells Kanaflex 300 EPDM and a couple of clamps. The pipe that comes from the tank has a rather interesting Airstream made adapter that reduces the pipe from a 3" ID ABS (outside 3.5") for a 3" ID flexible hose that the 3" sewer hose is connected. I could find no similar adapter, so I suppose that's why the make it up in the shop. This is connected with a standard 3" ID coupling to the 3" abs pipe to the valve. You remove the adapter, toss the coupling, and put the adapter on the other side of the quick-t adapter, stick about a 2.5" length of 3" Kannaflex 300 EPDM on it, and then stick it on the macerator. The other end of the flexible-t goes directly into the 3" abs pipe from the valve.

The cap just twists on.

Now, I can use the macerator, and when I return from a trip, remove the cap to drain any remaining fluid out. I can't imagine that it can be good for the macerator to have standing water sitting there all the time.

And if you don't believe me, unhook the hose from the macerator, and stand back!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	InterstateMod1.jpg
Views:	128
Size:	88.2 KB
ID:	241330  
__________________
2011 Interstate WD/Lounge
gmillerok1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2015, 06:54 PM   #545
3 Rivet Member
 
ben322's Avatar
 
2009 Interstate
Bethesda , Maryland
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 105
Nice mod! I thought about a schedule 40 sanitary T with two rubber couplers but thought it might be too stiff. That setup looks like it retains a lot of flex.
__________________
2009 Airstream Interstate
ben322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2015, 08:29 PM   #546
4 Rivet Member
 
2011 Interstate Coach
Muskogee , Oklahoma
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 386
Thanks! Using a rigid abs t was my first choice, but it was not possible to do without hacking off several inches of the 3" abs pipe from the valve, or permanently gluing it on, and I don't like doing things I can't undo in case it doesn't work out.

The Flexible-t is an almost perfect fit. Even though it is longer than the stock 3" black flex pipe AS used, there is no adapter on the valve side or the macerator side besides the homemade one AS made, so you gain about 3" back by doing away with it. The down side to the flex adapter is that I wanted to put a twist on shut off valve on the t, but was concerned the flexing could be a problem with it attached to the t bouncing down the road.

The flex pipe is very stable and fits nicely in place of the standard 3" hose.

On thing I forgot to mention. If anyone removes the hose from the macerator, it does NOT go back snug as far as you can push it on. There is a small, raised area that will keep it from being tight if you push it on too far, and it will leak. The trick is to back it off so the hose is just on the smooth round part on the end, and no farther.
__________________

__________________
2011 Interstate WD/Lounge
gmillerok1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.