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Old 12-06-2014, 06:41 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by c21bill View Post
I installed one of these in my prior RV. Great little safe and totally hidden by a rug. I haven't assessed the underside of the AI to determine if one of these would work.

Q200K RV Wood Floor safe
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Old 12-06-2014, 06:44 AM   #16
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If the bad guys found a safe, they would think something valuable was in there. The damage done while ripping it out would cost more than whatever i could afford to put in it.
Yup, I talked about that issue in one or two of my replies. A safe is the ultimate thief-bait. But in my case there's a liability factor for business reasons (I'm less liable if I can demonstrate that I took every reasonable precaution against theft).

As I mentioned before, if anyone installs any of these things, they ought to leave it open when not storing something important. That way a thief won't destroy your infrastructure trying to get into an empty safe.
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Old 12-06-2014, 09:01 AM   #17
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When I was still working, highly confidential materials in my car were the rule, rather than the exception, as was true for thousands of fellow worker bees, their supervisors, etc.

Locked up and out of sight kept things secure, and there was never an issue presented by anyone as to anything more that needed to be done.

The Interstate, locked up, is a pretty secure place, I feel, and much more so than my Toyota Matrix, which never had a break-in, and the tinted windows of the Interstate prevent all but the most persistent "peepers" from seeing what or who is inside.

A break-in could happen....just ask Protag, but he is in NOLA ....but is highly unlikely in but the most unusual and remote of situations, IMO.

Unless one had a lot of cash or valuable jewelry to secure, wouldn't your locked Interstate suffice to your employer as reasonable security and precautions for confidential information?

Just sayin'......with such limited space, a safe and its' weight just don't seem feasible or necessary. But, that's just my opinion.


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Old 12-06-2014, 11:05 AM   #18
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I intend to just have a secure place in my Interstate to store any papers with personal information. Recent thefts had been targeted to just get your vehicle registration as it has plenty of personal information like your home address. In one recent case in Seattle area a couple, while out hiking, had their vehicle robbed including their registration. The thieves then went to their home and robbed it too since they knew the couple was not home.

ID theft has become more lucrative for the bad guys than just stealing stuff. Perhaps some of you saw this story recently published by AARP.
How Millions of People Fall Victim to Identity Theft – AARP
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Old 12-06-2014, 01:19 PM   #19
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I beg to differ from some of the expressed opinions: everyone knows an RV is a home from home, and as such contains a myriad of valuable items such as money, credit cards, cameras, iPads, etc, etc. So if it's parked in a State Park with lots of site cover (bushes and trees) or at a trailhead where there's no one else in site - and here in the southwest we have thousands of remote trailheads - then you're seriously exposed to the opportunist who will break a window for a quick grab of what's inside.
So a good alarm system such as fitted by Protag, plus a quality and secularly fitted safe seems essential to me.


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Old 12-06-2014, 02:11 PM   #20
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That's true, Dude, just very rarely happening is all I am saying.


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Old 12-06-2014, 02:37 PM   #21
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It's a sad thought but, locks only deter the honest

There are numerous ways that almost any auto can be broken into in under 30 seconds without the telltale breaking of a window. A safe tells a crook where all the valuables are. And many of us bring tools for the crooks to borrow.

A good hiding spot that takes time for even you to get to, seems like another option. Crooks are in a hurry. But yeah, a safe would slow them down too, besides showing due diligence to insurance companies. I get it

Another thing that I am up against, is that most little girls could break my trailer door lock, trying to open the door when it is locked. ( don't ask how I know ). They won't get in, but I end up locked out, with a broken expensive lock. So I don't always lock it.
I try not to travel with hard to replace and expensive items.
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Old 12-06-2014, 02:45 PM   #22
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P.s.

I should get a deadbolt. I should do a search on a deadbolt that will fit an Airstream. ( although the search engine doesn't like me )
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Old 12-06-2014, 04:09 PM   #23
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Sad but true, an alarm system is only a theft deterrent to the casual thief. To a determined thief, it's just a theft detector.

For Interstate owners who want a bit more security, I recommend a high-end alarm system. If you have a smart phone, get one that has a smart phone interface instead of a key fob remote. The smart phone interface will tell you when the alarm has been triggered even if you're a thousand miles away, as long as the vehicle is parked where it is in range of a cell tower, and you're also in range of a cell tower.

The alarm system with smart phone interface basically turns the whole vehicle into a light-security safe. It won't prevent determined thieves from breaking in, but at least it will let you know there has been a break-in more-or-less in real time, so you can take immediate steps to minimize the adverse effects of the loss.

The only real protection against your Airstream being burglarized is to have insurance that includes contents protection in sufficient value to cover the loss of anything that's not attached to the vehicle, along with dated photographs of those items inside your vehicle to prove they were there. For example, if you normally store your laptop in a particular cabinet, open the cabinet door and take a picture of the laptop in the cabinet, then take photos of the laptop separately with attention paid to the data plate with the model and serial number. Store all of the photos on a flash drive hidden someplace safe (in an Interstate, taped under the dashboard is relatively good), with another copy of the flash drive at home. Then in the event of a burglary, take photographs again after the fact, so that you have before-and-after comparison.

That bit about the photographs is actually a lesson learned from the Hurricane Katrina evacuation, for homeowners and renters, but it's equally valid for RVs. People who had their belonging photographed like that had their insurance claims processed much more quickly, and usually got more money than those who didn't have similar documentation.
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Old 12-06-2014, 08:42 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by UKDUDE View Post
I beg to differ from some of the expressed opinions: everyone knows an RV is a home from home, and as such contains a myriad of valuable items such as money, credit cards, cameras, iPads, etc, etc. So if it's parked in a State Park with lots of site cover (bushes and trees) or at a trailhead where there's no one else in site - and here in the southwest we have thousands of remote trailheads - then you're seriously exposed to the opportunist who will break a window for a quick grab of what's inside.
So a good alarm system such as fitted by Protag, plus a quality and secularly fitted safe seems essential to me.


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I agree that an RV could be a target. But I don't think an alarm will do you much good in remote areas. Thus the point of this tread to consider a secure safe.


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Old 12-07-2014, 07:31 AM   #25
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I agree that an RV could be a target. But I don't think an alarm will do you much good in remote areas. Thus the point of this tread to consider a secure safe.

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The two obvious challenges with remote areas are, of course:

(1) No cell phone coverage
(2) No law enforcement presence even if you do manage to get a cellular signal.

Been there, done that, many times. If you want a good test of your back country skills, try the Arizona desert. None of the above plus no trees to attach bits of survey tape to as waypoints. We ended up giving associative names to large saguaro cacti as memory aids (cairns don't always cut it because you can't see them from a distance).

It works both ways though, because remote areas often have:

(3) Fewer thieves, as fewer people will bother going in that far, unless they know there's something valuable there.

I had a camping buddy who left his Lexus LS for several days in deep east Texas. I think the only reason that thing didn't get stripped is that nobody could find it.
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Old 12-07-2014, 07:36 AM   #26
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The only real protection against your Airstream being burglarized is to have insurance that includes contents protection in sufficient value to cover the loss of anything that's not attached to the vehicle, along with dated photographs of those items inside your vehicle to prove they were there.
...
I have photos but I also always take cell phone videos, and if I'm going on a trip I take them literally minutes before I leave my house, with the cell phone staying with me.

I also upped my Interstate insurance coverage over what was quoted to me as the contents default, which would not even cover camping gear let alone any valuables.
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Old 12-07-2014, 07:53 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Lily&Me View Post
When I was still working, highly confidential materials in my car were the rule, rather than the exception, as was true for thousands of fellow worker bees, their supervisors, etc.

Locked up and out of sight kept things secure, and there was never an issue presented by anyone as to anything more that needed to be done.
...
Maggie
In my case the liability profile is a bit different, because I'm the one who owns the company. The buck doesn't just stop here - it gets sued for here.

For those of you who intend to carry personal papers (re: the person who raised the issue of ID theft), I do recommend the encrypted external hard drives rather than paper copies where possible. I have a 300 GB older Apricorn drive with a six-digit push-button code, and a newer 750 GB Thinkpad with an eight-digit code. FWIW, the reviews say these things are basically impossible for all but the most sophisticated user to break into. I like them because they conform to the K.I.S.S principle - no software to learn or install, no mess - just a code you have to enter manually by pushing actual buttons to unlock the drive (in the past, I tried encrypting external HDs via software alone, but I had a software corruption and I lost the drive contents... fortunately it was just a back-up drive). I tend to put scans and vendor-supplied PDFs (e.g., IRA statements) of my personal and business stuff on these and then papers themselves remain in my bank box.

An example here... military-grade encryption, they say.

APRICORN Aegis Padlock 1TB USB 3.0 2.5" External Hard Drive with 256-bit AES Encryption A25-3PL256-1000 Black - Newegg.com
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Old 12-07-2014, 10:40 AM   #28
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Oh my gosh…… I get it but…..it's kinda funny

When we start talking military grade software, and Bond….James Bond, are we missing the point. We are campers, sitting by the campfire, singing Cumbaya, eating hot dogs and smores, and drinking beer, with our cell phones turned off.
Just joking around, I know full timers needs are different from mine
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