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Old 08-19-2015, 10:33 AM   #29
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US Navy uses bromine instead of chlorine.
Model 6979 Potable Water Brominator | Howell Laboratories
Turns the water slightly pink, but supposedly tastes better than chlorine. Don't think they make a small portable model for RVs, though you can get one for a swimming pool. Just thought it was interesting.
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Old 08-19-2015, 10:53 AM   #30
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My two cents….

I use the drain valves to drain, not the sink faucet. There at the lowest point, you get more water out, and that's what there meant for.

Also I try like heck not to drink trailer water. There are just too many ways for it to get contaminated, and a whole lot of work to keep the water safe. I still do the best that I can.

I really only dry camp. Some of the festivals I go to have a spicket to get water, and many advise not to drink it. Even if the water coming out of the ground is good, you never know what the person before you did to the nozzle, bib, hose, etc. I saw a guy shampooing his hair, rubbing the hose thru his hair to rinse. Like a jerk, I said something, and got a whole lot of noise about minding my own business, and not to give him a hard time.
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Old 08-19-2015, 11:12 AM   #31
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Also I try like heck not to drink trailer water. There are just too many ways for it to get contaminated, and a whole lot of work to keep the water safe.
Whole lot of work? Disinfect once a year as per manual with a bit of chlorine. Fill up with chlorinated city water whenever possible. Then drink up. You'll be fine.
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Old 08-22-2015, 06:17 PM   #32
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Whole lot of work? Disinfect once a year as per manual with a bit of chlorine. Fill up with chlorinated city water whenever possible. Then drink up. You'll be fine.
I think geography plays a significant role in the results that one can expect. Here in the subtropics, I cannot even keep my dog's water dispensers free of bacteria if they are allowed to set with any quantity for more than 48-72 hours. And that's at an indoor temp of 77 degrees, AFTER disinfection and AFTER re-filling with chlorinated muni water each time. Every time I turn around, I'm draining the reservoirs and scrubbing away more brown slime and pink slime and gosh knows what else.

We have our Interstate garaged and the average daily summer temp inside the unit is right around 100 degrees (no direct sun but re-radiation off the building's metal roof is fierce). In those conditions, overgrowth will occur within about 24 hours, so I gave up on all efforts to maintain a water reserve. I have taken to keeping the tank as dry as possible during these summer months, which is another form of inconvenience because then I'll take the Interstate out for a local spin to the beach after forgetting to add some water for the trip and, dang, I won't even be able to rinse off my feet or whatever. Brain lapse.
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Old 08-22-2015, 06:53 PM   #33
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water in the holding tank

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Originally Posted by Jekerrville View Post
Wierdstuff,


Chlorine is a reactant and it CAN damage features of a water system.

So, a tablespoon of chlorine in 50 gallons is going to be about 1000 PPM. Household bleach will be somewhat less than pool chlorine or USP chorine. No problem.
Correct me me if I am wrong on this.
1. I always thought that the hot water tank is made of aluminum.
2. If you are passing chlorinated water through the tank wouldn't this cause a reaction with the aluminum tank and produce aluminum chloride. Wouldn't that shorten the life of the tank?

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Old 08-23-2015, 07:06 AM   #34
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Wolf146

I have searched high and low for aluminum hot water tanks and can not find a supplier so I am going to go out on a limb here and say that there is not such a beast in an AS.

Fuel tanks, expansion tanks, water bottles yes, but not hot water tanks.

In the beverage industry aluminum cans are lined to prevent just the type of oxidation you mentioned in your post.

If an aluminum hot water tank is available I suspect it too is lined with non-reactant coating of some sort.

In my post previously quoted I suggested a very mild application of chlorine in potable water to be sufficient to purge bacteria but not so strong as to harm the plumbing.

Sorry if I did not make my self clear.

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Old 08-23-2015, 07:31 AM   #35
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I have searched high and low for aluminum hot water tanks and can not find a supplier so I am going to go out on a limb here and say that there is not such a beast in an AS.
It is a very thin limb. Check the orange text box at the bottom left corner of the first page of the brochure in this link:
http://www.askforatwood.com/images/W...ceTri-Fold.pdf
Is specifically says "Atwood water heater tanks are composed of a high strength aluminum."
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Old 08-23-2015, 09:19 AM   #36
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What is the inside of the tank lined with?
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Old 08-23-2015, 01:56 PM   #37
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Thank you gentlemen for your reply. So I guess you would want to limit the amount of chlorine that gets into the hot water tank. wolf146
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Old 09-02-2015, 01:36 PM   #38
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Maybe this is unorthodox and a little more expensive but I am trying this

- when storing for just a couple weeks
- fill tank with water treated with aquamira
- run it into the faucet also
- before camping drain and fill with filtered water from home. (We don't favor the taste of aquamira... But our earthquake emergency barrels are treated with it)
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:58 AM   #39
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A few days ago, my husband asked me this question: Why can't we simply get one of those UV lights and stick it in the top of that fresh water tank and kill the incessant slime that way? Even if we still decline to drink the water, at least it would stop clogging the danged pump filter.

Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation - not a new technology, but not used in RVs to my knowledge (but I haven't researched it yet).

Portable use, yes - for instance the product SteriPEN, widely touted as a cheap travel solution to Montezuma's Revenge. For years, hand-held UV devices have been advocated for back country use, but I always defaulted to my K.I.S.S. solution, which is the JetBoil, one of the greatest consumer products ever invented. With a hand-held UV device, maybe you can kill some water microbes, but a JetBoil does that PLUS it makes Mountain House meals and tea.


I've added this idea to my must-look-into-it list. It's a long list.
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Old 09-03-2015, 09:27 AM   #40
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Back in the days of wagon trains.......silver coins were put into the water barrels. The silver ions, generated by the coins sloshing around in the barrel, kept the water potable. Too bad we don't have silver coins anymore.


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Old 09-03-2015, 12:11 PM   #41
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Back in the days of wagon trains.......silver coins were put into the water barrels. The silver ions, generated by the coins sloshing around in the barrel, kept the water potable. Too bad we don't have silver coins anymore.
Doesn't need to be coins. Any silver that will tarnish will work, including antique silver table settings, jewelry, etc.

I didn't know about pioneers using silver for water treatment, but I'm well aware of silver's antimicrobial properties. When I caught an MRSA infection after foot surgery, I needed to have a large fraction of my (infected) left heel bone removed, and the incision had to be kept open for over over a month until the incision healed from the inside out. If the incision had been stitched closed, the infection would have been sealed in and I'd never have healed. I had to repack the wound daily with a material called "silver alginate" to keep the open incision from getting reinfected and to keep it from closing too soon as well.

Anyway, the problem with using silver as an antimicrobial water treatment is that you need to have a solution of about 1 part per billion silver ions in the water to kill microbes, but how much silver metal do you have to add to obtain that concentration? Too little and it doesn't kill the microbes, too much and it can hurt you to drink the water; silver is a poison for humans as well as for microbes and werewolves.
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:55 PM   #42
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Doesn't need to be coins. Any silver that will tarnish will work, including antique silver table settings, jewelry, etc.



I didn't know about pioneers using silver for water treatment, but I'm well aware of silver's antimicrobial properties. When I caught an MRSA infection after foot surgery, I needed to have a large fraction of my (infected) left heel bone removed, and the incision had to be kept open for over over a month until the incision healed from the inside out. If the incision had been stitched closed, the infection would have been sealed in and I'd never have healed. I had to repack the wound daily with a material called "silver alginate" to keep the open incision from getting reinfected and to keep it from closing too soon as well.



Anyway, the problem with using silver as an antimicrobial water treatment is that you need to have a solution of about 1 part per billion silver ions in the water to kill microbes, but how much silver metal do you have to add to obtain that concentration? Too little and it doesn't kill the microbes, too much and it can hurt you to drink the water; silver is a poison for humans as well as for microbes and werewolves.

If Colloidal silver can be used for killing viruses and bacteria in people
It can be used in this situation.
It all depends on how it is made.
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