Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-06-2013, 10:34 AM   #1
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,708
30 Ft to an Interstate?

Just wondering if there are many folks who have moved from a larger trailer to a class B and how did you find adapting to the change?

We have owned several trailers over the years, the latest being a Classic 30 and always enjoyed them we have moved up progressively from 20 ft to 27 ft to 30 ft, with the last one being our only Airstream.

I have often thought I wouldn't mind owning a class B motorhome. Our first step up from tent camping - many many years ago - was to a Westphalia. We used it with our two girls at the time and managed fine & the way that so much was packed into so small a space always appealed to me.

I am now getting to "A certain age" and thinking that in many ways there could be an advantage now to switching to a class B.

I know it would certainly be a different style of camping and think I could adapt to it - we are both physically quite small so that should be a plus!

Presently due to parking restrictions where we live, I have to store our trailer and it is about a half hour drive from our home. A bit of a nuisance and also makes it hard for me to work on it - and tinker with it!

When we bring it home to pack for a trip, we can apply for parking exemptions on the street - 15 per year, so we bring it home one day, clean and pack it and leave next morning. Same thing when we return home - arrive one day, keep it at home overnight, clean and unpack next day and take it back to storage.

But now it seems likely the city is going to change the regs and we will only be allowed two overnight parking exemptions per year. And I know from past experience they are pretty diligent about handing out $60 tickets!

This may be the straw that breaks the camels back and gets me to thinking much more seriously about making the change!

A class B which would fit "just" in our driveway between the garage and the sidewalk which we cannot block. I confirmed a couple of years ago that there were not any city regulations against this - although I would need to double check before making any purchase!

My wife isn't convinced that the switch would be a good idea! I had proposed a Class B to her about 4 years ago when we bought the Classic 30 and she just felt they were too confining.

Personally I think we would get more use out of the RV in that it would be sitting right at home ready to go with little effort. Currently we use our trailer for a 6-8 week winter trip, and maybe a couple of shorter trips during the summer.

I am suggesting to my wife that we would need to rethink the way we use the RV. I feel with a class B, we would be much more likely to take more shorter trips in summer, and with a short trip, being more confines shouldn't be a big deal. For our longer winter trips, I thought we could use the class B to travel south, and then rent a condo or park model for a month when at our destination.

If anyone else has been in a similar situation, I wonder what your experience has been in downsizing in this way.

Has it worked for you, or did you regret making the change?

I'm looking at Airstream, Roadtrek (made very near our home) and Pleasure Way.

They all seem quite similar - so far, I rather like the layout of the Pleasure Way.


Sorry for the long post!

Brian.
__________________

__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 10:47 AM   #2
Rivet Master
 
m.hony's Avatar
 
2013 30' Classic
Greenwood , Mississippi
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11,828
I have heard others like the Pleasure Way better.
I personally do not like the Road Trek.
The Interstate is awesome, but much smaller than a trailer.
Could you move to a less restrictive place?
In our little town there aren't many covenants or bylaws. Our trailer is behind the house accessed by an alley.
You have such a great rig now- I think anything you do would seem like a backward step or would have regrets- you are at the top of the food chain on trailer and tow vehicle. it just don't get no better than what you've already got!
__________________

__________________
2013 Classic 30 Limited
2007 Silver Toyota Tundra Crew Max Limited 5.7 iForce
2006 Vivid Black Harley-Davidson Road King Classic
1999 Black Nissan Pathfinder LE
TAC #MS-10
WBCCI #1811, Region 6, Unit 56
Airforums #70955
m.hony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 11:05 AM   #3
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
Just wondering if there are many folks who have moved from a larger trailer to a class B and how did you find adapting to the change?
I didn't downsize to an Interstate. Mine is my first— and probably will be my only— Airstream.

But I decided on an Interstate for reasons similar to what you're facing.

I wanted an RV that I could park at my appartment complex, rather than renting storage elsewhere.

I wanted an RV that I could use as a daily driver if my other car was in the shop, so I also had to be able to park it at the office.

Since I still work for a living, I wanted one that would be easy to take out for short weekend trips.

But it also had to be able to tow a car; for hurricane evacuations, I'd hate to drive off in my RV and leave my car behind.

Interior volume is relatively small compared to just about any Airstream trailer, but for the most part the space utilization is pretty clever. All the comforts of home in a 22¾-foot-long and 6½-foot-wide package. I may have to fold up one comfort of home and put it away in order to enjoy another comfort of home, but I can live with that.

By adding a removable receiver-mounted cargo tray, I can carry the outdoor stuff (grill, patio mat, lawn chairs, etc.) outside rather than cluttering up the interior with the outdoor stuff in transit. Or by using my toad as a trailer substitute, I can pack the outdoor stuff in my car, and tow it. By the time I'm fully set up at the campsite, the car is empty again and ready to be used for in-and-around driving.

And there is definite appeal to being able to travel at more than 18mpg— or almost 18mpg while towing my car— en route to my destination.

I test-drove the Winnebago Era and Roadtrek Adventurous before settling on the Interstate. If the deal on the Interstate fell through, the Roadtrek would have been my second choice. I researched the Great West Legend and Pleasureway Plateau, but couldn't find a dealer nearby, so they weren't really in the running. Which is a shame, because the Great West looked promising. These days, the Leisure Vans Free Spirit would have to be considered as well; a Sprinter-based RV with a slideout would be a lot roomier, but when I bought mine, the Free Spirit wasn't available.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 11:38 AM   #4
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by m.hony View Post
I have heard others like the Pleasure Way better.
I personally do not like the Road Trek.
The Interstate is awesome, but much smaller than a trailer.
Could you move to a less restrictive place?
In our little town there aren't many covenants or bylaws. Our trailer is behind the house accessed by an alley.
You have such a great rig now- I think anything you do would seem like a backward step or would have regrets- you are at the top of the food chain on trailer and tow vehicle. it just don't get no better than what you've already got!

Yes, it would indeed be a tough decision if we go that way, we are pretty happy with what we have!

I am really only giving it semi-serious thought because of the parking restrictions where we live - and the fact that we are not getting younger, and my guess is that a class B would in that sense be more user friendly and allow us to extend our RV'ing experience longer - not needing to carry Hensley stingers about and that sort of thing.

As well, my wide would be able to drive the class B which could be a plus both just to share the driving a bit and in case of emergency. Although barely 5', She drives our truck every day with no problem, but would never pull the trailer!

I think we'd likely make the switch to a class B before we would move from our present home despite the parking restrictions. We've been in this house 15 years now and it suits us well and is in a very nice area.

These things are never easy - always pros & cons! I guess another option might be to buy into an Airstream Park such as LYH in Melbourne and leave the trailer there!

Thanks ……… Brian.
__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 11:50 AM   #5
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
I didn't downsize to an Interstate. Mine is my first— and probably will be my only— Airstream.
I did think that if we moved to a Class B, we would likely get a small vehicle to use as a daily driver (we use our diesel truck at present). and get set up to tow it with the Class B.

Or perhaps initially invest in an enclosed trailer to haul our motorcycle on trips plus provide extra storage space for as long as I keep the bike.

Did I read ear;ire in your posts that you tow a Mini? I have a fully restored an modified '79 Mini as a hobby car. Not sure I would take it along though!

Can you tow the new mini with four wheels down or does it need to be on a dolly?

Using a toad to carry extra equipment seems a good idea. We use the back of our pickup in a similar way to keep the trailer uncluttered. Not only tools, genie, ladder, chairs etc etc go in there but also big rubbermaid boxes of extra clothes, shoes/boots and some tinned or dry foodstuffs (and beer of course!)

We carry two bicycles on the front of our truck with a regular 2" hitch receiver - possibly that could work on the Class B's too. Not sure if they make front receivers for the Sprinter though. We have done this with our last three tow vehicles.

I have often wondered why they didn't make Class B's with a slide - seems a natural. From what you say there is one made I will have to take a look at that!

Thanks ………………….. Brian.
__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 12:04 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
m.hony's Avatar
 
2013 30' Classic
Greenwood , Mississippi
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11,828
Protag tows a Honda Fit.
__________________
2013 Classic 30 Limited
2007 Silver Toyota Tundra Crew Max Limited 5.7 iForce
2006 Vivid Black Harley-Davidson Road King Classic
1999 Black Nissan Pathfinder LE
TAC #MS-10
WBCCI #1811, Region 6, Unit 56
Airforums #70955
m.hony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 12:06 PM   #7
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
Did I read ear;ire in your posts that you tow a Mini?
2013 Honda Fit Hatchback.
Quote:
Can you tow the new mini with four wheels down or does it need to be on a dolly?
Motorhome Magazine's "2013 Dinghy Towing Guide" doesn't have a listing for the Mini. However, Roadmaster makes custom-fit towbar baseplates for 2002-2014 Minis. Some models, at least, not Sport or Aero models, for example. Blue Ox and others might make them as well.
Quote:
We carry two bicycles on the front of our truck with a regular 2" hitch receiver - possibly that could work on the Class B's too. Not sure if they make front receivers for the Sprinter though.
I very much doubt it. The situation is complicated by the fact that the Interstate doesn't have a standard Sprinter front bumper. However, there's no reason why you couldn't put a bike rack on the back of your toad!
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 12:56 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Foiled Again's Avatar
 
2012 25' FB Eddie Bauer
Vintage Kin Owner
Virginia Beach , Virginia
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 5,883
Rent a Van Conversion /Stringer Sling

On a whim (and ignoring financial sanity) I considered getting an Interstate to tow my Airstream. It would be a better daily driver for me than a pickup truck and provide a totally private guest room for those times I go somewhere with family and friends. Of course I found out almost immediately that they weren't good tow vehicles for that kind of weight. In the mean time I met an Interstate owner who graciously let me drive hers. Poof, lost interest... just didn't fit my needs or wants. Luckily found that out without spending a dime.

Wingeezer - now you have the perfect pressure point to get your wife to tow the Airstream. YOU are worried about hitching & towing long distances with the 30 footer. "OF COURSE honey, if you could share the driving with me we could keep the big one much much longer...." Go somewhere away from any traffic on an easy road and get her to take over for half an hour... be supportive and grateful. She'll start kicking herself for not trying it sooner. Then your only worry will be keeping her from going on week long shopping expeditions with her girlfriends!

About the stringer. I find the Hensley stringer to be a real pain. It's awkward, heavy and has sharp edges, but it's bending over or kneeling to get it up and down that I find makes me worry about dropping it or pinching fingers, etc. I've often thought to myself - why don't they make these things with handles? Then I got a seven foot length of seatbelt material - from a junkyard for a buck - and made a sling. Just sewed loops on each end, with the tow vehicle receiver end big enough to slide over the entire stringer, the other just a bit larger than the actual stringer itself. I stow the stringer in the Airstream. Now all I have to do is just slip the sling on the stringer and around my back over one shoulder. I lift it just enough to clear the exterior door, then easily carry it over to the tow vehicle. Slide the stringer into the receiver, set the cotter pin, then pull the sling off. I know I'm not going to drop it on my foot and I don't have to maneuver it into the receiver at the risk of fingers getting pinched or strain my back at the awkward point where I'm trying to move it past the outside "garage door" of the Airstream without scratching the inside of the door. When I stow the stringer I leave the sling on so it's ready to hitch. My original idea was to use a piece of nylon rope, which turned out to be a good way to find the ideal length for the final solution, but dug into my shoulder.

I JUST had the brilliant idea to sew a pocket on the sling for the hitch pin and cotter pin. I'm also going to make some kind of bag or holder to carry all the other bits and pieces than are needed to secure the hitch and adjust the tension on the bars ... Creative Laziness wins again! I once drove off and left tensioner pipe for the old Reese Dual cam on the battery box. Really required some ingenuity to hitch and unhitch after that. (Used my huge adjustable wrench - the hanger hole on the wrench would fit over the snap up bracket and oddly it made it a zero strain operation to tighten the bars, because the wrench was nearly vertical and all I had to do was LEAN into the "bar" rather than lift it.

(You know, I envy people who are naturally artistic designers and can stage and customize the interiors to look truly beautiful... but I guess my creativity isn't absent... it is just more utilitarian than artistic.)

Paula
__________________
Today is a gift, that's why they call it the present.
Foiled Again is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 01:06 PM   #9
Rivet Master
 
Lily&Me's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
Normal , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 13,563
Our first RV was a 24' Barth, which was easily twice the inside room of our 22' Interstate.

We found with the Barth (as we emptied it out) that we carried lots of extra stuff in the generous storage, stuff we didn't use but was there "just in case". Lots of extra weight in a unit that got poor mileage on a good day.

The only thing we have really missed about the Barth is the dinette. We enjoyed that larger frig a lot, too, but it would not be fully utilized these days unless the grandchildren were with us.

The biggest adjustment to the Interstate was how narrow it was compared to the Barth......which seemed cavernous in comparison.

That said, to say that we have adjusted is an understatement. 6 1/2 years, 132,000 miles and 48 states later, we remain in love with our Interstate.

We love the set-up, the luxury, the fuel economy and being able to go anywhere without restrictions due to size.


Maggie
__________________
🏡 🚐 Cherish and appreciate those you love. This moment could be your last.🌹🐚❤️
Lily&Me is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 01:19 PM   #10
Rivet Master
 
Skater's Avatar
 
1995 30' Excella
Bowie , Maryland
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,344
Lots of people buy Class Bs that previously owned larger Class As or long trailers. They like the smaller footprint, which usually means easier to drive, better mileage, and easier to park. No more handling heavy hitches, either.

But the real key is whether you will enjoy camping in it. If you don't enjoy camping in it, you're not going to use it, making it a waste of money. On the road, our B190 was probably among the best in campers - it was fun to drive and easy to park when we weren't towing a car. Without a car, stopping anywhere for lunch was no problem at all, unlike with a trailer where you have to find a place with room to park. But when we were camping in it, we found it to be too small - we were always bumping into each other and the cat, and we didn't like the bedroom setup. Because we like our trailer so much more than the B190, we use it a LOT more than we used the B190 - from 6 or 7 trips a year to 13 or 14 this year, for example. But everyone is different.
__________________
1995 Airstream Classic 30' Excella 1000
2014 Ram 2500 Crew Cab with Cummins 6.7L Diesel

Sold but not forgotten: 1991 Airstream B190
Sold: 2006 F-250 6.0L Powerstroke Supercab
Skater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 02:22 PM   #11
BikerBill
 
2014 Interstate Ext. Coach
Poconos of Pa , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 239
smaller

We downsized this summer from a custom built, 15 year old 40' long Prevost Country Coach bus that had a SHOWER larger than the whole wet-bath in our 2114/13 Interstate. Its COZY. Fuel consumption was 7mpg, now 18 mpg on diesel. I can get into small campgrounds. I can go visit our daughter and park in her driveway. The bus weighed in max at 48,000, this weighs in at a little over 10,000. We don't need to tow a car with the Interstate. Lots of plusses and many negatives. But we wanted smaller.
__________________
Bikerbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 03:20 PM   #12
4 Rivet Member
 
DIR1's Avatar
 
1973 27' Overlander
1995 19' "B" Van Airstream 190
Bay City , Oregon
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 449
We have a 1973 27' Overlander...my frist Airstream... my little dear... However, I don't tow either... and the TV is Don's regular vehicle.. I like to "go" more than he does, so last year I bought a 1995 Airstream Bvan that I can drive...
I love it... He's also become very fond of it after a few trips.. the ease of parking, no hitching/unhitching shared driving and all those other things already mentioned...
I'd hurt my back and we were going to a rally in California last oct... the truck was way to rough riding.. even my Honda CRV was not good... The Bvan was way more comfortable than either of them!!! I was surprised...
We kept the trailer, but the Van gets out more... Also, I believe the older models have more storage than the Sprinters???
__________________
The B van at JRRV 2014 rally
DIR1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 08:16 PM   #13
2 Rivet Member
 
herrick51's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
gresham , Oregon
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
Just wondering if there are many folks who have moved from a larger trailer to a class B and how did you find adapting to the change?

We have owned several trailers over the years, the latest being a Classic 30 and always enjoyed them we have moved up progressively from 20 ft to 27 ft to 30 ft, with the last one being our only Airstream.

I have often thought I wouldn't mind owning a class B motorhome. Our first step up from tent camping - many many years ago - was to a Westphalia. We used it with our two girls at the time and managed fine & the way that so much was packed into so small a space always appealed to me.

I am now getting to "A certain age" and thinking that in many ways there could be an advantage now to switching to a class B.

I know it would certainly be a different style of camping and think I could adapt to it - we are both physically quite small so that should be a plus!

Presently due to parking restrictions where we live, I have to store our trailer and it is about a half hour drive from our home. A bit of a nuisance and also makes it hard for me to work on it - and tinker with it!

When we bring it home to pack for a trip, we can apply for parking exemptions on the street - 15 per year, so we bring it home one day, clean and pack it and leave next morning. Same thing when we return home - arrive one day, keep it at home overnight, clean and unpack next day and take it back to storage.

But now it seems likely the city is going to change the regs and we will only be allowed two overnight parking exemptions per year. And I know from past experience they are pretty diligent about handing out $60 tickets!

This may be the straw that breaks the camels back and gets me to thinking much more seriously about making the change!

A class B which would fit "just" in our driveway between the garage and the sidewalk which we cannot block. I confirmed a couple of years ago that there were not any city regulations against this - although I would need to double check before making any purchase!

My wife isn't convinced that the switch would be a good idea! I had proposed a Class B to her about 4 years ago when we bought the Classic 30 and she just felt they were too confining.

Personally I think we would get more use out of the RV in that it would be sitting right at home ready to go with little effort. Currently we use our trailer for a 6-8 week winter trip, and maybe a couple of shorter trips during the summer.

I am suggesting to my wife that we would need to rethink the way we use the RV. I feel with a class B, we would be much more likely to take more shorter trips in summer, and with a short trip, being more confines shouldn't be a big deal. For our longer winter trips, I thought we could use the class B to travel south, and then rent a condo or park model for a month when at our destination.

If anyone else has been in a similar situation, I wonder what your experience has been in downsizing in this way.

Has it worked for you, or did you regret making the change?

I'm looking at Airstream, Roadtrek (made very near our home) and Pleasure Way.

They all seem quite similar - so far, I rather like the layout of the Pleasure Way.


Sorry for the long post!

Brian.
Hi,
We,ve had the 30 classic and our last was a 25 FC. So far,we like our Pleasureway RB. This layout has a fixed rear bed with front seats that swivel with full leg room for both seats and a removal table by the front seats which gives two distict living area. We also added under cabinet drawers in the bedroom which increase our storage options. Also,added a drawer above clothes bar in hanging locker. Installed a spare tire carrier which frees up all the space under bed. The bed has struts which raise the bed for access from the rear doors. We now have space for two Lafums recliners, ll bean screen room ( nice outdoor space ), bbq and other rv accessories for travel. We considered Interstate tb and the Ltv unity. We like the size of 22/9 inches for the Pleasureway. However with the tire carrier,the length is around23/6. This winter we will spend one mo. In rv park/ one mo. State, county, federal parks and finish off with one mo. In oceanside ,cal rental .our tip back to Oregon will take one mo. At state,blm, us forest service campgrounds which are perfect for class b's. Also be aware, maintenance on the MB chassis will not be inexpensive. The drivability is wonderful. Some new options coming on market next year might increase your choices. Overall, the b makes up for space with outstanding handling, greater flexibilty for camping and increased mileage. Have fun searching and remember, travel is the enemy of ignorance and your bank account.
__________________
herrick51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2013, 08:25 PM   #14
2 Rivet Member
 
herrick51's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
gresham , Oregon
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
Just wondering if there are many folks who have moved from a larger trailer to a class B and how did you find adapting to the change?

We have owned several trailers over the years, the latest being a Classic 30 and always enjoyed them we have moved up progressively from 20 ft to 27 ft to 30 ft, with the last one being our only Airstream.

I have often thought I wouldn't mind owning a class B motorhome. Our first step up from tent camping - many many years ago - was to a Westphalia. We used it with our two girls at the time and managed fine & the way that so much was packed into so small a space always appealed to me.

I am now getting to "A certain age" and thinking that in many ways there could be an advantage now to switching to a class B.

I know it would certainly be a different style of camping and think I could adapt to it - we are both physically quite small so that should be a plus!

Presently due to parking restrictions where we live, I have to store our trailer and it is about a half hour drive from our home. A bit of a nuisance and also makes it hard for me to work on it - and tinker with it!

When we bring it home to pack for a trip, we can apply for parking exemptions on the street - 15 per year, so we bring it home one day, clean and pack it and leave next morning. Same thing when we return home - arrive one day, keep it at home overnight, clean and unpack next day and take it back to storage.

But now it seems likely the city is going to change the regs and we will only be allowed two overnight parking exemptions per year. And I know from past experience they are pretty diligent about handing out $60 tickets!

This may be the straw that breaks the camels back and gets me to thinking much more seriously about making the change!

A class B which would fit "just" in our driveway between the garage and the sidewalk which we cannot block. I confirmed a couple of years ago that there were not any city regulations against this - although I would need to double check before making any purchase!

My wife isn't convinced that the switch would be a good idea! I had proposed a Class B to her about 4 years ago when we bought the Classic 30 and she just felt they were too confining.

Personally I think we would get more use out of the RV in that it would be sitting right at home ready to go with little effort. Currently we use our trailer for a 6-8 week winter trip, and maybe a couple of shorter trips during the summer.

I am suggesting to my wife that we would need to rethink the way we use the RV. I feel with a class B, we would be much more likely to take more shorter trips in summer, and with a short trip, being more confines shouldn't be a big deal. For our longer winter trips, I thought we could use the class B to travel south, and then rent a condo or park model for a month when at our destination.

If anyone else has been in a similar situation, I wonder what your experience has been in downsizing in this way.

Has it worked for you, or did you regret making the change?

I'm looking at Airstream, Roadtrek (made very near our home) and Pleasure Way.

They all seem quite similar - so far, I rather like the layout of the Pleasure Way.


Sorry for the long post!

Brian.
Hi,
We,ve had the 30 classic and our last was a 25 FC. So far,we like our Pleasureway RB. This layout has a fixed rear bed with front seats that swivel with full leg room for both seats and a removal table by the front seats which gives two distict living area. We also added under cabinet drawers in the bedroom which increase our storage options. Also,added a drawer above clothes bar in hanging locker. Installed a spare tire carrier which frees up all the space under bed. The bed has struts which raise the bed for access from the rear doors. We now have space for two Lafums recliners, ll bean screen room ( nice outdoor space ), bbq and other rv accessories for travel. We considered Interstate tb and the Ltv unity. We like the size of 22/9 inches for the Pleasureway. However with the tire carrier,the length is around23/6. This winter we will spend one mo. In rv park/ one mo. State, county, federal parks and finish off with one mo. In oceanside ,cal rental .our tip back to Oregon will take one mo. At state,blm, us forest service campgrounds which are perfect for class b's. Also be aware, maintenance on the MB chassis will not be inexpensive. The drivability is wonderful. Some new options coming on market next year might increase your choices. Overall, the b makes up for space with outstanding handling, greater flexibilty for camping and increased mileage. Have fun searching and remember, travel is the enemy of ignorance and your bank account.
__________________

__________________
herrick51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.