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Old 06-08-2019, 09:13 AM   #1
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When Fido Travels with Humans

When Fido travels

Our two Blue Heelers depend on our best judgment. We do not consult either dog with options while traveling. Experience and judgment is the responsibility of the owner to consider Season, Climate, Weather and Location, public or private property handling.

We prefer ‘open range’ to camp. Many trailer owners prefer trailer parks. Different rules for different locations. You work with what you are comfortable and adapt. If you cannot adapt to the rules of the park, neither will your best friends... If you have problem pets... it is you, not your pet that have the problem.

Both Heelers have a separate Pet Porter when traveling on the back seat. They are always anxious to get into their individual porter when the truck door opens. When pups, they rode together. When adults, they had their own porter.

With a F350 4x4 Ford, we now use a sturdy ramp that folds up in half for storage and it is used when we stop. This prevents any sprains or shoulder injuries jumping out of a pet porter at four feet above the pavement. After a few ‘guided runs’ in and out of their pet porter, they both have become williing participants.

Blue Heelers are work dogs. Too large to sit on your lap. Too small to add a saddle to ride. They are in their comfort zone hiking on or off the leash. We are in charge. At first they would compete for the control of the pack... but got the message.

If we leave our Heelers at camp for any reason, we can string a rope between two trees and attach their leashes so they can get to shade, water and food. If you have no tree options... you are the bright human... figure it out yourself. Being helpless is a choice.

The options for stowing away your pets is common, good sense. Many of the Homo species have no sense. Common or good. Been there, seen it. Ranch dogs will ride in the bed of a pickup and not fall out. Training a dog to travel in a pet porter would be much better for you.

Our Heelers sleep on separate pet pillows or even a shag carpet they fit upon inside the trailer. Let them decide who sleeps under the table and the other in the hallway. First come, first serve. Let them decide. Not your job.

Barking dogs? That is your problem. Not the dog. If they bark and you cater to each and every whim... look in the mirror.

Dogs are pack animals. Once the leader of the pack is determined, order is established. The smaller the dog, the more... ego, I have noticed. That is your job to cure. You let your dog get his/her way all of the time, it is you that needs a leash.

Pinch collars are good. Several kinds. They are not evil or hurt a dog’s feelings. A swift diverting tug gets attention. Even a choke collar. It worked on me. My wife let me know who is boss.

OK. I have offered our travel options with two working dogs. Dogs are dogs. Weighing two pounds or 75 pounds... YOU have to be in charge. If not... please, do not camp near us. Watching television programs how to manage other people’s pets does not always work. A trainer must be YOU. A paid trainer will get your dog under control. When the dog is back with you, your DOG will have you under control.

Do we have dog issues? Few. You must be smarter than your dog. You must have good judgment as to weather, temperture, potty times and rules. If your dog or dogs are your Babies... well, you need them to teach you a few lessons in pack leadership. You are a Dog Sitter, not a Dog Owner.

Let me have it. We all have different opinions. Our dogs are under control. We understand... why. We all have 'tricks' for managing our pets. What are some of yours? I jumped into the deep end of the swimming pool by choice. Pull out your 'doogie bag' and pick up after yourselves... we do that for our dogs. Sometimes yours. Thank you for hanging on this long. I like a short leash for myself.
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Old 06-08-2019, 09:31 AM   #2
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I’m in complete agreement except for one thing. I often let my dog select our destination. Sometimes he drives.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:06 PM   #3
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Should also add, please carry that full poop bag to the trash. Don't be the inconsiderate one that leaves it by the side of the trail.
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Old 06-08-2019, 03:26 PM   #4
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Should also add, please carry that full poop bag to the trash. Don't be the inconsiderate one that leaves it by the side of the trail.
*****

Some, if not most, hikers with a dog are Poop Baggers. I carry one PB in my left pocket along side small change, in event one is needed. PB's can be carried anywhere for use at any time for about anything.

These bags have multiple uses. Humans believe when they should be using a PB it is not necessary. Coyotes, included. Where do you draw the line?

Hikers will 'bag the poop' and set it alongside the trail to be picked up on the way back. Most of the time the 'poop in the bag' remain where it was resting. Much like having bread dough rise before being baked. The Mohave Desert works wonders.

Do not be concerned about poop in a bag sitting alongside the trail.

It is the dog owner that doesn't give a poop who picks theirs up. Your bag or tread of a tennis shoe.

This is the custom on climbing routes in Boulder City, Nevada. Bag it going up, pick it up on the way down. For obvious reasons.

Mount Everest hikers and climbers... I am sure they keep a few PB's along.
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Old 06-08-2019, 04:11 PM   #5
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I'd just like to add our dogs (and kids & grand kids) have always liked a routine. Not always possible to adhere to it strictly, especially on the road, but as near as possible we walk him at the same time in the morning and evening. Like clockwork, he does his business and is good the rest of the day or night.
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Old 06-08-2019, 04:56 PM   #6
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Let me have it. We all have different opinions. Our dogs are under control. We understand... why. We all have 'tricks' for managing our pets. What are some of yours? I jumped into the deep end of the swimming pool by choice. Pull out your 'doogie bag' and pick up after yourselves... we do that for our dogs. Sometimes yours. Thank you for hanging on this long. I like a short leash for myself.
I remember one time I was in a gift shop at the top of Monarch Pass in Colorado and a blue healer was wandering around the gift shop, just doing a little shopping. The control of that dog was amazing. His people just told him that they wanted a salted nut roll, and he went to get it. Blue Heelers are awesome.
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Old 06-08-2019, 05:16 PM   #7
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I remember one time I was in a gift shop at the top of Monarch Pass in Colorado and a blue healer was wandering around the gift shop, just doing a little shopping. The control of that dog was amazing. His people just told him that they wanted a salted nut roll, and he went to get it. Blue Heelers are awesome.
*****
Somehow Blue decided to break out and do some shopping. A faithful dog always wants to be with the Pack Leader(s).

Heelers do not pay Sales Tax. Nor Income Tax.

When you and I speak of living the life of a 'dog'... it is a compliment.
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Old 06-08-2019, 05:20 PM   #8
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Pet Porters while in the Trailer.
Pet Porters while on the back seat of the tow vehicle.
Pet Porters while in the bed of the tow vehicle.
Pet Porters... well, you are catching on...

We have two sizes of porters depending on the space available.
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Old 06-08-2019, 05:25 PM   #9
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Again... other examples of how Humans can train the smarter Dog and even Cats can teach Humans a few things or two.

Dogs love to be in an enclosed area. Ours will try to get the other one to move from underneath the Trailer's table. The loser gets the bed in the hallway.

When we move they are crated. The heavy packing blankets are used when it gets colder in the Fall Season camping. This can be done inside the trailer with a blanket hanging over the table. Heck... had to find a way to keep Thalweg from pushing the Heelers out from the prime locations...

We tell the Heelers: "In the BOX"... and that is all it takes. At first I took a cardboard box and a blanket for their homes. When the cardboard box was upgraded... we still used the term box. Now you know everything you would ever want to know. Thank goodness.

They know their crate from the blankets within. I put their name on their crates so they will learn to recognize how to spell.
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:54 AM   #10
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Our Wheaten Terrier, Bailey loves traveling. She travels in her crate which is secured in the backseat of our Tundra. At a campsite, if allowed, we put up a run, consisting of a long bungee cord strung between two trees onto which we put her 50' leash. We will shorten everything if it encroaches on our neighbors. She is never off lead because she is a "ratter" and anything small with a tail is fair game. A switch in her brain goes off and she loses her mind. She is protective of the RV as if she was home, and we tell her to use her inside voice and she will tone down her warning barks. Trouble is, she loves people, and we can't get from point A to point B without having to greet everyone. I am heard to say to people "if you give her eye contact it is all over". If she ever gets off lead, she'll go home with anyone. She's been socialized since day 1, and has been traveling since day 1, so she is used to the hustle and bustle of it all. At night, she sleeps with me, and the husband gets the queen bed (he's the driver of this circus, so he gets the better sleeping option).
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:11 PM   #11
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Wow, I love your diatribe, good job. I am rescuing a rescue in October when my son and family return from a Navy tour in Japan. They rescued a terrified long-haired 7-pound chihuahua 7 years ago and treated him like an only child until their first human child arrived 2.5 years ago. I deeply love both of them. But their relationship with Chapo the chi never really rebounded with the arrival of my precious grandson who BTW loves El Chapo like a brother. When they said they might give Chapo away in Japan I said “Oh hell no you won’t!” Chapo has been my grand puppy and I know his little chi quirks and quibbles and I have a whole set of dishes and beds and everything else you have when you spoil a being. I have not Airstreamed with a critter before and so am paying close attention to my dog-owning Airstreamers that I am currently traveling with on my”Springtime in the Rockies” caravan. I am looking forward to his arrival, sort of like an end of pregnancy since I’ve known for 9 months he’s coming to me. It really is like taking in a child and at 67 I never thought I’d be doing this but in my mind, God has decreed.
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Old 06-11-2019, 07:21 AM   #12
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Wow, I love your diatribe, good job. I am rescuing a rescue in October when my son and family return from a Navy tour in Japan. They rescued a terrified long-haired 7-pound chihuahua 7 years ago and treated him like an only child until their first human child arrived 2.5 years ago. I deeply love both of them. But their relationship with Chapo the chi never really rebounded with the arrival of my precious grandson who BTW loves El Chapo like a brother. When they said they might give Chapo away in Japan I said “Oh hell no you won’t!” Chapo has been my grand puppy and I know his little chi quirks and quibbles and I have a whole set of dishes and beds and everything else you have when you spoil a being. I have not Airstreamed with a critter before and so am paying close attention to my dog-owning Airstreamers that I am currently traveling with on my”Springtime in the Rockies” caravan. I am looking forward to his arrival, sort of like an end of pregnancy since I’ve known for 9 months he’s coming to me. It really is like taking in a child and at 67 I never thought I’d be doing this but in my mind, God has decreed.
It should work out fine. We started traveling with our standard poodle when he was almost 11 yrs. old. A ball of fire when he was young, he's calm, mellow, and unflappable now. He adapted quickly and is a great travel companion.

Yes, a pet changes what you can do and where you can go somewhat. But we go where he can go with us. Many towns are dog friendly and a fluffy 70 lb. poodle gets lots of looks and kids love to pet him.


He takes the spot between the front seats when traveling and at night.
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Old 06-19-2019, 11:18 AM   #13
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Cattledogs Rule:)

Love cattledogs - got two blues myself. Haven't put our "new to us" 1972 Safari on the road yet, but the pups will travel with us once she's road worthy. Both like to ride and love to hike, so were planning to make the trailer boondock ready. As for dog manners - ours generally don't need their e-collars, but we used them in the training process and will break them out if necessary. E-collars are not necessary for every dog, but cattledogs can be hard-headed. They are super smart though and, once trained, are awesome companions. Ours have excellent recall, know how to walk on a leash and are generally polite to new people and other canines.

We haven't figured where they will sleep in the trailer yet (actually haven't figure that out for ourselves either). We are at the beginning of a shell-off restoration, and we just started the demo work a couple of weekends ago after putting on new axles. I'd love to see how other folks have worked the dogs sleeping areas into their campers. I'm thinking we'll put two dog beds up front along with two Euro Recliners for ourselves, but nothing is set in stone yet. We also have portable crates that we generally take with us when traveling but I don't see us using them in the camper.

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Old 06-19-2019, 11:27 AM   #14
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We travel with 2 male Golden Retrievers, one is 6 and one is almost a year old. Both travel on the floor of our truck (backseat up so they have enough room), sleep on the floor of the trailer (no bed necessary), are happy in any type of crate, relieve on command, do not bark or jump or even react to other dogs. We do have a washable blanket for truck or trailer should they determine swimming is a good idea. Can be tied down if necessary -again no barking or noise, walk great on a leash or are under complete vocal command if tney are not on a leash or tie down.

Super trained pups? Wonderdogs? Well not really, we raise Guide Dog Puppies and they have to be good canine citizens. The rules we follow from GDB socializing the puppies makes them so well behaved folks always come up and comment on how good they are. Most embarrasing trip ever, with three kids and two dogs a total stranger came up as he was leaving and said "I have never seen such well behaved dogs!" - too bad I couldn't use crates for the kids.

The younger one will go back for formal training in the fall sometime. The older one didn't make it as a Guide, so he is a certified therapy dog and he helps to train whatever puppy we have. Our current puppy is #25 so we've had a little practice.

And I agree the behavior of your pet is a reflection of the training and trust you have expended. Not all are perfect, but you can work with whatever issues they have.

Having said all that, I must admit our cat is horrible. She hates to travel (thows up, defacates, urinates and screams-and we've tried natural calming concoctions as well as drugs), loves to hide (I think to scare us into thinking we've lost her) and then make an entrance worthy of an aging screen actress, vocalizes her opinions at every turn (feed me, my chair, move the dog, pet me). Bossy, noisy, messy...we've finally decided life is too short to travel with the diva. She stays home with a sitter and yells at us when we get home.
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