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Old 03-30-2004, 03:41 PM   #1
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Rivet Pet Trauma Kit

Since we're all getting ready to hit the road, I thought it would be a good idea to post a thread for pet emergencies. It's always a good idea to check with your vet before you leave.

If you take meds like Benedryl find out how much and how often for your pet.

We had our dog tested for heartworm and used the medication before and after our last trip to Colorado last summer.

Pet Trauma Kit
1) Guidebook to Animal Emergencies
4) 3"x 3" gauze pads
2) 5"x 9" trauma pad
2) 4"x 4.1yd. stretch gauze
1) 2"x 5yd. cohesive flexible bandage
1) pair latex gloves
1) metal scissors
1) plastic forceps
1) pencil
1) 3 oz. bottle Certi-Dine PVP iodine
1) 4 oz. bottle eye-skin wash
2) insect swabs
2) 1 g. hydrocortisone cream
1) 1 oz. tube antibiotic cream
5) cotton swabs
2) antiseptic towelettes
1) powdered stypic
2) Green Soap towelettes
1) handiwipe
1) 2"x 5 yds. adhesive tape
1) 8"x10" resealable bag
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Old 05-09-2004, 12:14 PM   #2
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another First Aid list for Pets

Veterinarian's phone number
* Local Poison Control Center's phone number
* Gauze to wrap wounds or muzzle animal
* Adhesive tape for bandages
* Nonstick bandages to protect wounds or control bleeding
* Towels and cloth
* Hydrogen peroxide (3%)
* Milk of Magnesia or activated charcoal to absorb poison (Be sure to get the advice of your veterinarian or local poison control center before inducing vomiting or treating an animal for poisoning.)
* Eyedropper to give oral treatments
* Muzzle (soft cloth, rope, necktie or nylon stocking) or use a towel to cover a small animal's head. Do not use in case of vomiting.
* Stretcher (A door, board, blanket or floor mat)

Pet photographs with current immunization records.
* Makes sure pet always wears a collar with proper identification.
* A secure pet carrier of appropriate size, seat belt harness
* Food/water bowls
* A supply of dry food
* Water in plastic containers
* Pet medications and health records
* Leashes and muzzles
* Newspapers and paper towels for cleanup
* Animal Toys
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Old 05-09-2004, 02:10 PM   #3
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Good lists. That reminds me, I never even thought about heartworm. We don't get that up here so our dogs are unprotected. I guess that's another thing to consider when you're travelling - diseases you might not have to worry about at home.

I always give them their frontline (flea and tick) stuff monthly during trip season though, so at least they won't bring any of those back with them.
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Old 05-09-2004, 09:55 PM   #4
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Remember, the stuff that you use for heartworm and ticks/fleas is poison. The folks that work in the factories that make the stuff are required to wear protective clothing and take special precautions against exposure. Some dogs have terrible reactions to it - ours did.

It's much cheaper and safer, IMHO, to run a heartworm bloodwork test two or three times a year and treat if a test comes back positive. We need to run the heartworm bloodwork in May and November here in New Mexico. Cost? About $15 each. That's our only option anyway for our female German Shepherd. She's eleven and has never tested positive...

Chemical flea collars can be quite dangerous, radiating nerve poisons that pass into your system as well as your petís.

Truly healthy animals do not have much of a problem with fleas (again, IMHO). We feed a fresh food diet and it seems that we rarely see a flea even though they are a problem in NM where they are known to carry the plague. You do not want fleas here. We use several herbal preparations that have been very effective for us over the years including fleabane and limonene. Here are some other safe alternatives we've used successfully:

Fleago is a fine crystal borate powder that kills fleas, larvae, and eggs through a mechanical process of abrasion. The microscopic edges of the crystals scratch the exterior coating of the fleas, causing leakage of body fluids and death by dehydration. Unlike conventional poisons, fleas cannot become immune to Fleagoís effects. The crystals are simple to apply, migrating down into carpet fibers, flooring, and upholstery, where they are virtually undetectable. You can even treat your car for total protection. The inert mineral salts in Fleago are not toxic to people, pets, or plants. Allow two to three weeks for fleas to completely disappear.

Insect growth regulators (IGRís) can prevent a flea infestation from starting. Not a poison or a pesitcide, an IGR is a chemical compound that blocks the insectís hormonal activity and prevents flea larvae from maturing to adulthood. The IGR Methoprene, also known by the trade name, Precor, can be mixed as an odorless water-based spray and applied everywhere indoors where fleas might reside. Precor is invisible, nontoxic, and remains effective for four to seven months.

Pyrethrum powder has been used for decades to kill fleas and other pests indoors. Sprinkle in your house and in your vacuum bag to kill hatching larvae, or use as a flea powder directly on your pet.

Food for thought!

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Old 05-09-2004, 11:27 PM   #5
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Hmmm, sounds like fleago is plain old boric acid powder..... cuts those little fleas all to pieces, they dehydrate and die.
We travel extensivly with our dogs, and swear by Frontline Topspot topically applied. Used once every ninety days is sufficient for fleas, but if you want to make sure no ticks, then every thirty days is a must.
Lyme disease from deer ticks is a horrid disease, exensive to treat. The vaccine for Lyme is not 100% and has caused more problems than Topspot!
Heartworm can be treated. Again, extremely hard on the dog, and expensive. If you want ot save money, check into Ivermectin sold in farm stores as a cattle wormer, I think. That was the first preventative. My dad's dog developed heartworm so I am familiar first-hand with the tretments, monetary costs, and how hard it on the dog!
Having seen the havoc ticks, heartworms, and fleas, can cause to dogs and the households they live in, my choice has been to use both Heartguard and Frontline. Your choice does not have to be the same.
And don't forget to keep some pepto bismo in the dog box- good for all kinds of tummy upsets or diarhea. Milk of magnesia is good for hotspots, as is Listerine. Peroxide is good for several things, including making a dog heave if you have to! Vet approved to get them to upchuck.
Hmmm. What else is in my tack box? 2% hydrocortisone ointment, triple antibiotic, triple anitbiotic ointment for eyes, a quart of saline solution, ear cleanser, ear powder from Ron's Pharmacy in Texas (boric acid powder, zinc oxide powder, iodoform powder), blue lightening ear treatment (16 drops 2% gentian violet, 2 Tablespoons boric acid powder in one pint rubbing alcohol) Oh yeah, vet wrap, that self adhesive stuff used to wrap horse's legs.... comes in great colors! I also keep aspirin on hand, melatonin for calming, especially during thunder storms, and flagyl pills. I'm sure there is other stuff there, I'll have to check.
The dogs carry a bigger bundle of paperwork with them than I do for myself! Copies of registrations, their microchip numbers on everything, on all paperwork for each dog, current vaccination records..... we go back and forth to Canada.
And for what it's worth, when we go to Canada, we take only enough food for them to eat while there, and a new, unopened bag to come back into th states.... that way we don't lose our dog food at the border as happened to friends of mine!

Elizabeth in Iowa
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Old 05-10-2004, 07:08 AM   #6
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Elizabeth,

We will be heading to Canada in a few weeks. Can you start a new thread/topic regarding your tips/hints on crossing the border (both ways) with dogs? I think it would be very helpful to us animal lovers.

Sounds like you got it figured out.

Thanks!

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Old 05-10-2004, 08:18 AM   #7
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crossing border

X-ray, we cross the border a lot as I am from the states and my wife is from canada, all you need is their rabbies papers. Marvin BTW if you are near Peterborough stop and say hello. Lots to see and do here.
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Old 05-10-2004, 08:43 AM   #8
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Please clarify that you don't need a health certificate to cross into Canada or return to the US.

Thanks,

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Old 05-10-2004, 09:26 AM   #9
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certificates

X-ray, Just got off the phone with costoms, just wanted to make sure and not give you the wrong info. If you are going from the states to canada you need rabbies certificate for cat or dog within the last three years. Going from canada to the states you need a rabbies certificate within the last year. That is all you need. A lot of times they don't even ask us for that but we always have it in hand and maybe they know what it is. Marvin
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Old 05-10-2004, 09:35 AM   #10
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Muchos gracias!

Very helpful.

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Old 05-10-2004, 10:09 AM   #11
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So Marvin - re - going into the states - if they are asking for a Rabies Certificate for that year and we are on a 3 year system here - are we to re-vaccinate or has your vet just dated and signed the 3 year certificate.

PS this topic is a real heated one on many canine boards - in most cases the Rabies is good for 5 years but the Veterinary system is slow (cautious) to let down the guards. But also the huge issue of owners not taking their pets to the vet on an annual basis - money issue yes but I believe more of a health issue.

A few other points from above....
Heartworm chemicals is what they actual treat your dog with if it had heartworm - so basically you are giving a small dose monthly - IMHO Bloodtesting is much healthier for your dog. (Lost two dogs at 8 to cancer) and am convinced it is because of all the treatments we pump into them.

Healthy dogs well fed (either fresh, raw, high grade kibble with extras) and exercised with excellent immune systems are not likely to pick up fleas, ticks and the like. Fleas, Ticks and Lice are everywhere in the ground - dogs that have problems with these are usually run down, or have an underlying disease or on a very poor quality kibble that is basically fiber filler (100's out there).
Smaller dogs that have a sedantry lifestyle can be prone - just becuase they are small does not mean they don't need exercise - and weight control is a huge issue with many pet owners - a fat dog will be a dead dog to fast - keep your dogs on the lean side as opposed to the chunkier side.

Treat with icecubes and lots of exercise. Does not mean you have to walk them - just play a game of fetch with the little ones get them running around your house/trailer.

Fresh garlic in meals is a good ward to mosquitos - we live in mosquito haven and have used the natural garlic based spray in our yard/forest (no chems) and it really does work - it is the natural sulfar that garilic gives off that mosquitos do not like so they stay clear. (you don't kill them and anyone who thinks they can with these fandangled zappers and stuff well - there is money well spent on something of more value . Fresh galic gloves ground up/pureed and frozen in icecube trays - then give a 1/4 tsp per meal - they don't get really stinky garlic breath but eventually they do eminate the sulfar that wards of the mosquitos.

Tip on the poops - try bring a can of pure pumpkin pulp along or add to your firstaid list. Give a table spoon per meal for two days then down to 1/4 per meal - it will clear it up in a jiff. If not then you should be going to a local vet as there will be a more serious problem than just something they snarfled up.

Great lists above - will add a few items we did not have - PS Duct Tape is a must too on any list. Came in very hanyd when our one golden cut her paw right to the bone with a zebra muscle - pressure bandage and duct tape provided the stability presure and water resistence needed till we could get her to the vet - a 2 hour boat trip from where we were.

don't forget lots of cotton balls or swabs to clean out their ears - when camping/boating there are lots of things that can get in there that normally would not when at home.
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Old 05-10-2004, 11:45 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cedars
My dad's dog developed heartworm so I am familiar first-hand with the tretments, monetary costs, and how hard it on the dog!
I agree! Some dogs don't survive the treatment. My sister lost her dog to heartworm treatment last month. We have mosquitoes here like crazy, so I'd rather not take the chance with my pooch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cedars
What else is in my tack box? ...triple anitbiotic ointment for eyes...
Where do you get the antibiotic eye ointment? What is the brand name?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cedars
...ear cleanser...
I use a 50/50 mix of white vinegar and rubbing alcohol. The vinegar promotes an acidic environment and the alcohol dissolves the ear wax and dries moisture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xray
Truly healthy animals do not have much of a problem with fleas (again, IMHO).
I don't think it's that easy. I had two Pomeranians when we were first married. They ate the same, exercised the same, went everywhere together, slept in the same bed, etc. They were almost two halves of one dog. One of them always had at least a few fleas on her no matter what we tried (until the new flea preventatives came out). The other dog never had a flea. Go figure!
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Old 05-10-2004, 12:07 PM   #13
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I agree, I don't see why the health of a dog should effect if it has fleas or not. Then again, if a dog has a bad infestation, it will not be as healthy - maybe giving the impression that only sickly dogs get fleas. Fleas are a parasite, and they will jump on your dog if given the chance. Our Dal, Chester, recently found a dying wild bunny in the yard and brought it back to the patio before we noticed what he had and made him drop it. I then spent the next hour picking these HUGE fleas off of him! He's very allergic to fleas, and just a few bites will leave him pink and itchy and miserable all over. The next day I went to the vet and got some more Frontline for him just to be sure we hadn't missed any (he was a little overdue for his monthly dose) - plus obviously the bunny was infested and was in the yard, so there's always a chance of picking them up in the yard.

As I understand, the topical flea treatments are a food-grade pesticide which is used on fruit and veg imported from foreign countries. Understandibly, anyone working in a factory, handling huge amounts of any chemical daily would have to take safety precautions, but that doesn't mean that it is necessarily poisonous when used in proper dosages on your pet. It's a heck of a lot better than the useless sprays, powers and collars I grew up with. When I was a kid we had dogs who suffered terribly from fleas, so as far as I'm concerned, the Frontline is a huge step forward.
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Old 05-10-2004, 12:32 PM   #14
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aking for rabies cert.

Sharon, Toby is just over two years now, the last two times they haven't even ask for a cert. but I guess we will have to cross that bridge when we come to it. Marvin
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