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Old 03-29-2005, 01:19 AM   #15
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I have a white Boxer 12 years old. She can't hear very well most white ones don't. She is eating a all natural dog food senior Canidae and Precise Plus. She can still get out and run, then crash for a while and do it again. So find a good human grade senior food without by-products, corn, wheat, soy, dairy products, BHT,BHA. Depending on the condition you may see some improvement.
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Old 03-29-2005, 07:22 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hippo
I have a white Boxer 12 years old. She can't hear very well most white ones don't.
Not all white ones are deaf, but many. many are.

We have two Jack Russells, both EXACT same markings. all white w/ a black ear, and one is hearing and the other one is deaf as a post. In fact, we got her from

www.deafdogs.org

If anyone is looking for a really good dog, go there.

She is young, smart (too), energetic, and just about perfect. Except she can not hear. Not a problem for HER; if she doesn't want to know what I want, she just doesn't look for a hand signal :-) Exactly like my deaf kid used to be!

She came complete, with great personality, spay, all shots, heartworm check & prevent.

This thread has made me take my other dog to the vet (yesterday) to have a blood test to make sure she doesn't already have heartworm, then begin the prevent.

I had not ever known how serious the treatment is!
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Old 03-31-2005, 12:42 AM   #17
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Hey AS people try this website out. gone2thedogs.com to find out what kind of a dog your are inside. Just take a short test, it's fun.
Chuck
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Old 04-16-2005, 10:57 AM   #18
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Heartworm treatment

Regarding treating dogs for heartworms - I work with the largest golden retriever rescue group in Florida, www.grrmf.org. In florida we take in many many dogs with heartworms each year. We have treated all of the successfully with no problems, and, dogs of all ages. We do use vets that are experienced in treating heartworms and follow the care guidelines carefully. We have saved over 1600 goldens to date, many with heartworms. They have treatment, are adopted, and live normal lives. If the infection is caught early enough certainly treatment can be effective.

I would like to add that many many people don't understand how dogs get heartworms. They think if their dog is an inside dog, that it can't get heartworms. It only takes the bite of one infected mosquito to infect your dog. A dog can get a bite just out on a walk. It is so simple to prevent with one a month heartguard preventative. BUT, if your dog hasn't been on monthly preventative, it should go to the vet first for a heartworm test to make sure he/she is negative before going on the treatment.

Also just a plug for spaying and neutering pets - dogs that are not fixed experience a much much greater risk of reproductive cancers in their lifetimes. Besides the obvious reason of not having unwanted puppies, spaying and neutering can prolong the life of dogs. We see far too much cancer in dogs, and this is an easy way to greatly reduce your dog's risk.

Barbara
2005 Airstream Safari 25 SS
12 year old golden Rocky (who is the designated Airstream dog)
12 year old golden Monroe (a heartworm treatment survivor)
14 year old golden mix Rusty
and 3 cats!
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Old 04-16-2005, 12:05 PM   #19
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My 2 cents worth

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcanavera
The vets here in STL have been advising keeping up the preventative year round.

Jack
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!
I just spent$180.00 for two dogs (12yr old and 2 yr old white shepherds)heartworm prevention (Sentinel) for 3 mos- but it is worth it to me....for my companion animals.
I have had to euthanize dogs due to old age (she couldn't get up and walk-15yr old lab) and due to cancer (3 yr old shepherd). I evaluated the "quality of life" for each and determined that the costs plus the stress on the pet would not be worth it to keep it alive for my sake.
I am a canine behaviorist... a happy dog is healthy dog and vice versa.
I can not say enough about preventative care for companion animals.
They are still companions that we are responsible to care for- not children, yet a major financial responsibility, none-the less!
Sadly, sometimes what is best for our pet is to say "goodbye".
Not an easy decision, but often the right one.
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Old 04-16-2005, 12:23 PM   #20
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Thanks for the info on heartworms. Out West here we do give our dogs heartworm pills once a month. Out West here Sara (Boxer) and Shelby (1/2 Golden/Chow) take heartworm pills once a month.
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Old 04-16-2005, 03:38 PM   #21
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I wonder...

if spaying and neutering people would reduce the risk of cancer in humans? I can only imagine, in our great quest for living longer, that we would be lining up to be neutered if it were true.

I Googled the topic and learned that neutering a male dog reduces the risk of testicular cancer (among some others). Makes perfect sense to me. Take out the uterus and ovaries and you remove the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer. Most of the other cancers discussed were equally "self evident". The argument then is whether the life of the animal is adversely affected by spaying and neutering. The answer is probably "no" in most cases. So, what are the risks?

I've watched those commercials where everyone in the doctor's waiting room wants to be the next one chosen for the colonoscopy exam. The folks are "high fiving" each other and congratulating the next one going in. Because of first hand experience (my father's failed colonoscopy), I learned that the commercial doesn't tell you that, on average, 1 in 500 colonoscopies results in a bowel perforation - a very serious life threatening problem. 1 in 30 of these people die. How badly do you want to be next in line when it could end up killing you?

Mind you, I'm not an advocate of indiscriminate reproduction by dogs and cats and I believe we euthanize way way too many of them because of irresponsible owners. Yet, with so many unwanted animals in the world, the available options are slim and, in the long run, we are probably best served by neutering and spaying. All I want is to be told the truth about the risks so I can do what is best for my companion.

What are the risks in the procedure we are about to undertake? Are we asking the right questions or just listening to someone who has a financial stake in the process?

Jim Jordan (whom I admire and respect on this forum, BTW) mentions that one of the risks of heartworm treatment lies in the mass die off of heartworms. Yep, he's right but he didn't mention that heartworm preventatives also have known risk. Some dogs die from them. One of ours almost did.

Only after you assess the risks can you make informed decisions. Unfortunately, much of what we see is propoganda designed to further someone else's agenda.
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Old 11-19-2005, 03:50 AM   #22
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Just as a small aside, as a heads-up to the many clearly dedicated and loving pet owners here... I saw the mention of rimadyl. My older dog is an 18 year old german shepherd/husky, and like most older dogs, her hips get a bit stiff. For the last couple of years she's been on glucosamine and aspirin, which pretty much entirely took care of her discomfort until recently. I took Moose to the vet to see if there was anything to make her a little more comfortable. He had a long and serious discussion with me about rimadyl and it's potential hazards. Please bear in mind that rimadyl is almost solely given to elderly dogs when reading the statistics, as he reminded me. Nearly one in five dogs given rimadyl will die in the first week or two of liver or renal failure as a drug reaction. 85% of dogs on rimadyl will die in the first year of it. Nearly all of them will die by the end of the second year. The choice ends up being... do you shorten their time here to make it better time, and risk losing them entirely, or do you let them go on with discomfort or even outright pain.

That's always going to be a personal decision based on the animal, the level of problem and of financial ability, of course, but a lot of vets will not tell you (or do not know) how potentially dangerous rimadyl can be.

Just my $0.02.
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Old 11-21-2005, 12:45 AM   #23
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Dog pain

Arryana,
Go to the interent and look up DGP. That may help your dog. Innova dog food by Nutura makes a senoir large breed. The food is all natural with no by-products, corn, wheat. Good luck.
chuck
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Old 11-21-2005, 12:50 AM   #24
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Boxer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hippo
I have a white Boxer 12 years old. She can't hear very well most white ones don't. She is eating a all natural dog food senior Canidae and Precise Plus. She can still get out and run, then crash for a while and do it again. So find a good human grade senior food without by-products, corn, wheat, soy, dairy products, BHT,BHA. Depending on the condition you may see some improvement.
Chuck
WBCCI#7854
Sara our white boxer died in June from a tumor growing in her heart. The vet said that is very common. The vet also said 12 was very old for a Boxer.
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Old 11-21-2005, 08:23 AM   #25
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QUOTE from Xray: "I've watched those commercials where everyone in the doctor's waiting room wants to be the next one chosen for the colonoscopy exam. The folks are "high fiving" each other and congratulating the next one going in. Because of first hand experience (my father's failed colonoscopy), I learned that the commercial doesn't tell you that, on average, 1 in 500 colonoscopies results in a bowel perforation - a very serious life threatening problem. 1 in 30 of these people die. How badly do you want to be next in line when it could end up killing you?"

I can't argue with your statistics, because I have never researched the statistical implications of colonoscopies. What I can tell you is that because of regular annual colonoscopies, my doctors just found several masses growing in my small intestine two weeks ago. I am scheduled to find out more about exactly what my future holds later this week. I will likely face surgery to remove about a 1/3 of my stomach and about four feet of my small intestine, but the point is that I would not have known about the potential for an agonizingly painful and certain death had it not been for my decision to undergo the colonoscopies each year. Because of this latest procedure, I have found out about my problem early enough that I can realistically expect to do something about it. I now have a chance where no chance would have existed in a few more months.
While your statement is true that the commercial doesn't tell you the statistics of colonoscopies, doctors have always shared with me the realities of the procedure both orally and in writing before each procedure began.

If we never did anything in life unless it was a 100% sure thing then we would never do anything. I've been happily married for 37 years, 7 months and 21 days, but statistics show that over half of all marriages don't survive and will end in divorce. I've built a great ranch and herd of cattle, but statistics clearly show that most new businesses and especially agricultural enterprises never make it. I routinely enjoy our Airstream going somewhere most every month all year long, yet statistically I stand a chance of having an accident each time I pull out of the ranch gate. I am saddened to hear of your father's problems, but that should not be a reason for advising others to not submit to such a vital proceedure for their own survival and the same can certainly be said for the health of our animals and pets. On our ranch, our Vet bills are usually one of our highest inputs, but we wouldn't have been successful without that investment of time and dollars.
GStephens
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Old 11-21-2005, 08:23 AM   #26
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I've got a Sheperd mix. Got her from the pound. Let me first say that Penny means the world to me. I have had her for 13 years and they estimated that she was between 1 and 1 and a half when I got her (she was found roaming the woods and no one claimed her).

She had heartworms found the during the first year I had her. She had the older treatments which I think were arsonic or something nasty. She was kept as quite as a 2.5 year (approx) dog can be kept. She passed out one evening after a week after the proceedure. She had to be loaded into the car. By the time she got to the emergancy vet 20 minutes later, she was back up and about, with no other issues related to the deworming since. I keep her on the Heartguard over the warm months (over 40-45 degrees and higher), but discontinue it's use in winter (less than 40 degrees), though the vets now tell you to do it year around, I'm from the camp and belief of the fewer chemicals in body the better. Been doing that now for well over 10 years without problems. Anyway, I found that after the age of about 8, you can't get out of the vet's office for less than $400.

Very recently (mid September), Penny's belly was making some VERY loud groaning noises. She started to throw up more and more often and was having problems keeping nearly anything down. I took her to the vet, they said to first try some sensitve stomach food and some antacids. If the problem persisted, to bring her back in 3-4 days. Well, after a day, it was clearly getting worse. I just didn't call, I set up an appointment with the vet the next day. Took her in and the vet said "I don't know why you're here, it's only been a day". I was pretty angry with that and said, hey, it's not high acid in the stomach. She can't even keep the pills down.

So she charged me $40 for the 5 minute office visit and referred me to a animal specialty place about 10 miles away. When I got there, they shaved her underside (Penny, not the referring vet ), and gave her an ultrasound. Within seconds, they told me she had a blockage in her intestine and that very little could get by it. This made sense as Penny once weighed 67lbs and slowly got down to 55 lbs over the last year or two.

Anyway a decsion had to be made. Keep in mind the vet on the first visit did bloodwork that said Penny's internals were in better shape than dogs half her current age (13 to 14 1/2). So I made the decsion for them to go in remove the approx 1" of intestine and reconnect the two ends and sew her up. They also tested the tumor after removed.

$2800 later (including the 1st vet visit, second and procedures done at the specialty clinic), Penny, though slow, was on the mend. A few days later, I was to find out that the tumor was in fact Cancerous and that even though it appeard that they got all of it out, they still wanted to give her chemo. They told me to think about it and get back to them in a week, but to let them now take an xRay and confirm that no other areas were involved, and that the visual they do when inside is only half the screening. So another $250, she has no signs of growths, etc. They tell me that I should have the ultrasound done every 6-8 months, but I am not sure I may do it, heck, it's taken over 2 months for her hair to slowly grow back and then what, have them cut into a now 14.5 year old dog after the long healing process it took? The jury is still out on this leg of the process........

So now the immediate question at hand, chemo or not.

Well. Ol' Penny cost me $50 when I got here over a decade ago, she's been a big part of my life for over a decade and I can tell you that I never thought the costs as she aged would spiral as they did. That said, I'd do it again, even as friends and even my family told me I was nuts to spend that kind of money on a dog her age. It was a hard choice, but I passed on the Chemo not because I felt it wasn't a smart thing to do or because of the pressure friends and family put on me about spending the money I didn't have for her on proceedures to date, but because I wanted her remaining days to be better, not worse in the short term and hopefully longer term. The vet said this was an uncommon type of cancer, so the Chemo was not a clear fix to a possible longer term problem which is the main reason I passed. I just wasn't gonna put her through it as I saw my grandfather go through it, even though dogs take it better than humans, I was just not going to go there with such little hope of it doing much.

Today, a litte over two months later, Penny has more energy and on colder days, is more stiff in the hind legs. If it came to it, where asprin and the gluco treats stopped helping, and she could no longer walk, I would take the right steps needed and not give her something that would make her worse in one area to help in another.

Why am I telling you all this, because it's now post op, and after a month of freaking out at the slightest sound coming from her, I just read this post and had to get it off my chest....it's been a difficult time and I don't envy any pet owner that has to make the hard calls when they come be it a pet or another loved one (on two legs).

To keep this Airstream related, Penny is hopefully going to make it to the midwest rally in 2006 and God willing 2007 as well as stay in her favorite part of the Safari and bask in the sun that comes though the streetside windows and makes her happy and come out for short walks and sniff in the new smells of the outdoors away from home.
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Old 11-21-2005, 08:40 AM   #27
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BTW, Penny now weighs 60lbs, I would have added that to the novel I posted, but I only have 15 minutes to make changes to a post.
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Old 11-21-2005, 09:33 AM   #28
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I am glad to hear that Penny is doing much better. I have a German Shepard that just turned 12. His hearing is going, he has cataracts and his hips are hurting him too. I have place night lights in all the rooms in hopes that will help him see at night. I also turn on all the flood lights when he goes outside at night. I have had to go out and lead him back in. We had a scary moment when we were camping back in September when he fell off the edge of a dock because he didn't see the end. He survived that and even went back in the water the next day. He has been on glouscosamine for over 2 years now and I have been struggling with the option of Rimydil, especially since the cold weather is moving in. I don't like what I hear and read about it. So I think I will add an aspirin to his regime and see how that goes for now. BTW, he still enjoys going out in the Airstream and we plan on staying in it through Thanksgiving. As long as he is enjoying life, I will enjoy it with him! I dread the day when we will need to do otherwise.
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