Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-29-2007, 04:02 AM   #1
Rivet Master
 
Mackhopp's Avatar
 
2005 28' International CCD
Ottawa , Ontario
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 587
Images: 10
Cancer in our pets - how to prevent?

After reading several threads in the Pet Forum, I was struck by how many of our pets have cancer.

As a new dog owner, I'm trying to do my best w/r to Lexi's health, and to hopefully prevent disease.

One thing that I can see making a big difference would be what the pets eat. I've looked at lots of different foods, and short of feeding the BARF diet (Biologically Appropriate Raw Food or Bones And Raw Food), I've been feeding her Orijen dry food. Orijen Pet Foods: About ORIJEN:

As a biologist in research, I'm always looking to see if I can do better. But I'm not a nutritionist, nor am I a veterinarian.

So I'm interested in hearing what others do or have learned about preventing cancer in their pets - because while our pets are only here with us for a relatively short time, it's a good ride while it lasts, and it's up to us to make it as comfortable as possible.

Any thoughts?
__________________

__________________
Mackhopp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 05:20 AM   #2
Liquid Cooled
 
RedSHED's Avatar
 
2014 16' Sport
Columbus , Indiana
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 485
Images: 2
Our neighbors do lots of chemical things to their lawn. They lose a pet every 3-4 years.
We do not. Our lawn shows it too, but we've not lost a pet in 12 years.

Coincidence? Possibly, but you have to wonder.
__________________

__________________
RedSHED is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 06:23 AM   #3
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,191
There are ecologically friendly lawn sprays, that way your pet won't get sick from it.
I have learned a pet's diet is important, a dog is an omnivore, and a cat is a carnivore, so feeding your cat veggies is probably not conducive to their good health. As far as pet food, stick with good name-brand pet food formulated for your dog or cat's size, age, and breed. Science Diet and Eukanuba are both good choices. No one knows what is in the El Cheapo pet food, so stay f away from it.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 06:48 AM   #4
Rivet Master
 
juel's Avatar

 
1976 31' Sovereign
Currently Looking...
Chandler , Oklahoma
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,770
Images: 24
If we could find a way to prevent cancer in our beloved pets, wouldn't that be wonderful news for the human cancer patients. Having bred and shown dogs for more years than I care to admit, I have tried many things to keep my friends healthy. One thing I have always been concerned with is the quality (or lack thereof) of the commercial dog foods available. With the recent China wheat gluten scare I think we can all see than even foods "made in America" are not "American". Still can't figure out why the world's leading wheat producing country has to import wheat. Corporate greed comes to mind. I have fed Bil-Jac frozen food, made from chicken here in America for a long time. I have also made my own food from chicken livers, potatoes and other ingredients if a dog had allergy problems. I never feed anything that is colored or swells when liquid is added. I try to stay away from foods with soy or corn as the main ingredient. One fact that I know is that Great Danes live approximately 5 years here in the States; however, in Europe they often live to 10 or 12 years. Breeders in Europe make their own kibble. That really got me to thinking about what I fed my show dogs. Please remember that just because a Vet sells it, doesn't make it a good food. I agree about the lawn chemicals also. Not worth it with the pets, not worth it with humans either. No dog dips, or flea baths either. They are worthless. The Frontline or Advantage products are your best choice. They do not enter the bloodstream of the pet or the applier. They enter the fat layer under the skin of the animal. If you must spray the lawn, keep the animals off until it's very dry. Don't keep spraying it if the first time doesn't work. Spray outside your fence line.
__________________
juel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 09:12 AM   #5
Rivet Master
 
byamcaravanner's Avatar
 
1967 28' Ambassador
1963 19' Globetrotter
1970 29' Ambassador
Waukesha , Wisconsin
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,180
Best way to have a cancer free pet is to get one that is genetically diverse. Considering the relatively short life span of our pets, it's very unlikely that environmental exposure would be the cause of cancer.

Maybe we should all buy turtles
__________________
Steve & the crew
'70 Ambassador International Twin
'63 19' Globetrotter TAC WI-1
http://byamcaravanner.blogspot.com/
byamcaravanner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 10:33 AM   #6
Rivet Master
 
87MH's Avatar
 
1978 31' Sovereign
Texas Airstream Harbor , Zavalla, in the Deep East Texas Piney Woods on Lake Sam Rayburn
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,435
Images: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfrodge
After reading several threads in the Pet Forum, I was struck by how many of our pets have cancer.
.....So I'm interested in hearing what others do or have learned about preventing cancer in their pets - because while our pets are only here with us for a relatively short time, it's a good ride while it lasts, and it's up to us to make it as comfortable as possible.

Any thoughts?
Natural foods for sure.....

I've been feeding natural to my pack since they were pups and I stand by feeding natural AND homeopathic vets. "Regular" vets certainly have figured in their prospering also, but be aware there ARE alternatives. The difference feeding "natural" has made to some of the dogs I have fostered is stunning. Several of the "converts" I know have stated that the difference it makes to the well being of their dogs is remarkable. Most (and immediate) noticeable is the difference it makes to coats, "hot spots", itching, and overall level of activity.

Take a look at how robust dogs were prior to World War II (the feeding of "prepared" foods did not start until the late 40's).

I know for a fact that Shelties and Papillons (my breeds) have a fertility problem - maybe inbreeding - but I think that diet is a far more improtant problem. You have to ask yourself "what is the difference of canine health between the period before 1950 and the period after?".

I think the answer to that is diet. Packaged food as compared to freshly prepared food.

The primary suppliers of prepared food are most concerned with a diet that will support good growth and activity - and permit the producers to maintain a healthy profit margin - and not necessarily the best food to promote optimum overall quality of life for the animal.

I have no problems with the packaged food producers, they are providing a service for which they are paid (a lot like the worlds's oldest profession). I do, however, have a problem with the toxins and preservatives that are put into the prepared food to prevent them from becoming rancid. Long term exposure and ingestion of even minute amounts of these powerful chemicals has to have an adverse affect.


Several opinions are stated in this thread:
http://www.airforums.com/forums/f239...een-13463.html

Feeding canines only the cheapest packaged dry food is a bit like humans who prefer to comprise their diet entirely of Ho-Ho's for breakfast, Big Mac's for lunch, and Pizza with an ice cream chaser for dinner - those human live, maybe even happily, but probably not for long.
__________________
Dennis

"Suck it up, spend the bucks, do it right the first time."

WBCCI # 1113
AirForums #1737

Trailer '78 31' Sovereign

Living Large at an Airstream Park on the Largest Lake Totally Contained in Texas
Texas Airstream Harbor, Inc.
87MH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 10:41 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
Lumatic's Avatar

 
1971 25' Tradewind
1993 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Estancia , New Mexico
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,642
Images: 16
Blog Entries: 1
Check out a herbal combination called Essiac. I use it and it seems to help my immune system. There are several suppliers some more expensive than others. Comes in raw, powder, liquid and capsules. I use the powder as a tea. It's definitely an acquired taste. I know it is also used with canines, which is what my wife often calls me.
__________________
Sail on silver girl. Sail on by. Your time has come to shine.
Lumatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 11:34 AM   #8
Moderator
 
Stefrobrts's Avatar

 
1968 17' Caravel
Battle Ground , Washington
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 11,906
Images: 50
Blog Entries: 1
I am extremely sceptical about the homeopthic concoctions people try to pass off as helpful to dogs. Most homeopathic remedys are made of the 'essences' of herbals, which means they are in a dilution that is so minescule as for there to be no actual ingredient involved. For example, I recently read an article where a naturopathic vet recommended 'rescue remedy' be used on the way to the vet (both on the dog AND the owner!) to calm them both down. If you do a little research you quickly find that 'rescue remedy' has 'flower essentials' which is essentially nothing - but it is a 50:50 mix of water and brandy. So the active ingredient would have to be brandy! I was appalled that a vet would recommend you waste your time to give your dog a squirt of brandy when you should be taking them directly to a real vet as soon as possible - and to take one for yourself too.

Naturopthic remedys can make you waste your time and money doing things that are only a placebo, when you should be relying on solid scientificly evaluated evidence to make decisions on you or your pets health. Whenever I hear about people touting 'chinese' or 'eastern' medicine I turn on my BS detector. Things like arranging your energy flow by sticking pins in you just don't even make sense to me. I saw another article where a naturopathic vet explained 'bloat' was caused by "a liver/stomach disharmony" which could be adjusted with acupuncture! Do they teach that in vet school?! Those theorys have no scientific reasoning behind how they work, they just make people feel good. That's called a placebo, and if it makes you feel better that's one thing, but your pet doesn't know it's a placebo, so how much can it do for him?

As for all the dogs with cancer, back when I was a kid, dogs didn't get the kind of vet treatment they do today, so it is no surprise so many have been diagnosed. We are lucky that there are such fantastic treatment options that have filtered down from the human world also.

Obviously you want to feed your dog the best diet you can, but when I was a kid our dogs lived to a ripe old age on Alpo (and how good could that nasty stuff have been). I have spoke to several vets about the raw food diet and all of them recommended strongly against it. They all recommended going with a high quality kibble, and that is what they do for their own dogs. Don't you think they'd use all their knowledge and access to research to take care of their own family members first?

I think there is so much conflicting information around it is almost overwhelming to try and sort it out logically, and there is a huge weight on us from wanting to do the very best for our pets. They don't live long enough in the best of circumstances, we want to give them the best opportunity to live the longest they can. Every pet owner feels that pressure if they love their dog. But it also leaves us open to having to make decisions we are not really qualified for, not being nutritionists, chemists, or vets ourselves.

I think the solution is to have a partnership with a great vet you feel you can really trust, feed the best quality food you can afford, and keep up on their medical care and checkups to catch things early. Avoid unnecessary chemical exposures, get lots of exercise, and give lots of love. Enjoy your dog and try not to worry!
__________________
Stephanie




Stefrobrts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 11:52 AM   #9
Rivet Master
 
cameront120's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
North Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,422
Images: 23
I wish I knew the answers to preventing this disease. All I can do is feed my boys the best food I can. I don't feed raw, but they do get a high quality kibble.

I also agree with keeping chemicals away from you lawn and yard. North America's obsession with a green lawn is disconcerting. Such a waste of resources, especially water. The small patch of lawn I have does not get watered except for rainfall. I let it go dormant during the summer. Sure it's brown, dry and ugly, but it's harmless to my dogs. The uneducated think it's dead and are amazed to see it bounce back with the fall rains.
__________________
Cameron & the Labradors, Kai & Samm
North Vancouver, BC
Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! - Mame Dennis
cameront120 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 11:58 AM   #10
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,191
Another factor I didn't mention in my earlier post, many cities now have reclaimed water system available for lawn watering. If you use reclaimed water on your lawn, it would be a very good idea to keep them off it. While it isn't exactly the "before" contents of the sewer system, it also hasn't been purified for drinking.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 01:31 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
Lumatic's Avatar

 
1971 25' Tradewind
1993 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Estancia , New Mexico
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,642
Images: 16
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stefrobrts
I am extremely sceptical about the homeopthic concoctions people try to pass off as helpful to dogs. Most homeopathic remedys are made of the 'essences' of herbals, which means they are in a dilution that is so minescule as for there to be no actual ingredient involved.
Generally I agree. Herbal stuff has it's share of scams however:
Essiac has worked for me and others I know, some of whom use it on pets.
G,et the raw ingredients not an extract or tincture. I forget all the ingredients but you can find them on line. I do remember there are 7 including sheep sorrel, slippery elm, rhubbarb. You can spend a lot for it, but if you buy in bulk it's real cheap.

There are specific testimonial about curing cancer. I don't know about that but I feel better with it. I guess the bottom line is anything that tastes that bad has got to be good and after uning it for years I'm still as honery as ever.
__________________
Sail on silver girl. Sail on by. Your time has come to shine.
Lumatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 02:20 PM   #12
Rivet Master
 
Mackhopp's Avatar
 
2005 28' International CCD
Ottawa , Ontario
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 587
Images: 10
The pesticides and herbicides used on lawns have a huge environmental impact - I shudder when I see people using chemicals with abandon. We know of a cottager with great expanses of lawn leading down to the waterfront who regularly douses the lawn, even next to the water, with herbicides. With abandon. Makes me very angry.

But with respect to animals, environmental chemicals most likely do play a very important role in their health - pets may only live 10 or so years, but they age at a very accelerated rate as compared with humans, so cancers do show up, just as in humans.

As for pet food, I was struck by the lack of awareness many of my pet-owning friends had w/r to the food they buy for their pooches/kitties. I asked them to look at the ingredients - most of these supermarket brands had cheap filler grains as the first ingredient, as well as by-product meal. That just doesn't make good health sense in my opinion.

Dogs and cats are not humans, so why would we feed them tons of carbohydrates as their main food? Their digestive systems are simply not made to handle that sort of bulk.

Take Iams as an example. Most people (that I've spoken with) have a positive opinion on the brand. The first 4 ingredients on the puppy dry food are Chicken, Corn Meal, Chicken By-Product Meal, Ground Whole Grain Sorghum. Now, the Chicken is good. But the next 3 are not. Cheap fillers and by-product meal (blech).

As well, keeping in mind the China scare, there are many other ingredients present in pet food solely for economic savings (of course, the same could be said for much of the processed food out there for people).

I know pets are with us for only 10+ years or so but we ought to do what we can when they're young and healthy to keep them healthy, both for emotional reasons as well as financial reasons!
__________________
Mackhopp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 02:33 PM   #13
Rivet Master
 
cameront120's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
North Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,422
Images: 23
I can't feed anything with grain (including oats) to my two, they both react badly to it. Ear infections and allergic reactions, etc.
__________________
Cameron & the Labradors, Kai & Samm
North Vancouver, BC
Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! - Mame Dennis
cameront120 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2007, 04:12 PM   #14
Moderator
 
Stefrobrts's Avatar

 
1968 17' Caravel
Battle Ground , Washington
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 11,906
Images: 50
Blog Entries: 1
It's a good idea to have at least a passing knowledge of what's in your dog's food. Some supermarket brands do not have meat or meat by-products in teh first three or four ingredients!

The dogs we had when I was a kid probably did so well on Alpo because it was just straight canned horsemeat. I remember it being disgusting, but it was probably not such a bad diet for a dog!
__________________

__________________
Stephanie




Stefrobrts is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LA Times article slams U-Haul, states surge brakes would prevent sway SilvrSausage Off Topic Forum 17 06-29-2007 03:20 PM
Water spots...how to remove or prevent? Rog0525 Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 1 07-11-2004 05:54 AM
Floor cancer smily Repairing/Replacing Floor &/or Frame 15 10-13-2003 12:11 PM
Prevent rodents, ants in trailer. Ed Keyes 2001 Safari 3 09-12-2003 01:38 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.