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Old 10-09-2016, 07:54 PM   #15
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One of the joys of RVing, especially in an Airstream, is our beagle is always with us. National Parks have rules about doggies on trails that does limit the enjoyment of the park for us, but probably makes is more enjoyable for others. We find state parks more dog friendly. Commercial campgrounds vary in the amount of dog rules, but we seem to get by okay. Practicing pet etiquette is certainly required.

We took our beagle elk hunting in Yellowstone last month. She often boasts about bringing elk down like a Yellowstone wolf pack. This beagle ought to run for office, certainly knows how to exaggerate.

David
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Old 10-09-2016, 08:18 PM   #16
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Our dogs go with us to all state and fed parks sofar, always leashed.blm and nat forests during hunting, they run free with me.,
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Old 10-09-2016, 08:24 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascal0729 View Post
Go online buy a service animal vest
This is so popular now that it's hard to tell a real service dog from a dog with a coat and an owner that thinks they're above the rules.

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Old 10-09-2016, 08:28 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascal0729 View Post
Go online buy a service animal vest

Well, as DW says - just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

My $0.02 - if I can talk to a park about accepting my dog - if they can't accept her, I camp elsewhere. I don't think it's right for me to put a vest on her so I can camp there when there are people who actually need a dog to help them with sight or anything else.
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Old 10-09-2016, 08:38 PM   #19
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I agree with SteveSueMac. I have a friend that does that & it is really bull. This makes it difficult for legitimate persons that train.

We have 2 Golden Retrievers who travel with us to many state & federal parks. There are restrictions where they can go & we keep that in mind when we plan our trip.

Thanks
Jane
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Old 10-09-2016, 11:37 PM   #20
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Go online buy a service animal vest
People who really need service animals don't appreciate fakers who want to break the rules just to give themselves a cheap pass. Please consult a disabled person with a legitimate need about this and then come back and retract your suggestion.
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Old 10-10-2016, 06:28 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by SteveSueMac View Post
Well, as DW says - just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

My $0.02 - if I can talk to a park about accepting my dog - if they can't accept her, I camp elsewhere. I don't think it's right for me to put a vest on her so I can camp there when there are people who actually need a dog to help them with sight or anything else.
Yes.

I find it a bit sickening that one can "fake" the need for a service animal, and that people may actually do this.

I wouldn't do it.

Our dogs dictate to a great extent how we travel, and what we do when we travel, but that's okay with me.

Wouldn't be without her.


Maggie
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Old 10-10-2016, 09:12 AM   #22
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We travel with a Beagle. If the trailer goes, Moose is with us. We do not go to campgrounds that do not allow pets. Limits us some. Particularly on the west coast of Florida where we winter. But if you notice a very high proportion of campers have pets with them.
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Old 10-10-2016, 10:54 AM   #23
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Beagle wants to travel too

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robertjacobs View Post
We have been enjoying our 2016 AI for almost a year now, enjoying State and National Parks. Unfortunately our Beagle is not allowed inside these beautiful parks even with a leash. She loves to travel in our AI but often times we must leave her home.



What has been the experience of this community in handling pet restrictions in State and National parks?



RJ

I agree with your comments if you're referring to CA south of Monterey. One of our first trips was the Big Sur coast, and between private property and CA state parks, dogs were banned just about everywhere. I tend to bend the rules regarding dog access where I see they can be bent, but I found the prohibitions down there to be very repressive, so we probably won't be making any other trips there with the AS.

OTOH, up where you live around Gualala, I haven't had any problems at all. For example, in Mackerricher park north of Ft. Bragg, most of the park is open to dogs on leash, and there are quite a few of the more remote areas where people run their dogs off leash without any problems. All of the Mendocino headlands are open to dogs on leash, which is reasonable since the area is heavily used. Dillon Beach is totally accessible to dogs, on or off leash. Everywhere we have been in Oregon and Washington seems very dog friendly, as does Canada.

Our experience with National Parks in the west is consistent with your observations. Therefore, we look for other places to visit, which is a shame, since National Parks contain some of the most beautiful natural features in the country. However, they have become very crowded, so I don't mind looking for areas that might be slightly less impressive, but with dog access and no crowds, in the national forests and BLM lands.


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Old 10-10-2016, 11:49 AM   #24
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We bought our AS so that we COULD travel with our dogs. Our labs have been from Texas to Canada and many points in between. Other dogs have been on different trips with us but somebody in fur almost always accompanies us. Yes, there are rules, and you can't take them everywhere, but we take particular care to make sure they are well behaved when we do have to leave them in the camper. I, for one, find it paramount to follow those rules because there are plenty of people out there who don't and that puts all of our enjoyment at risk. I always ask before I take them into an establishment and, quite often, if one of us sits outside of a shop while the other goes in, the proprietor will come out and invite our dogs to shop as well.

Most state and national parks only allow dogs on paved trails. If we plan to go on a different hike we do it in the morning while it is cool and at a time when most of our neighbors would be out during the day anyway. Anyplace that absolutely forbids dogs, and there are some, don't get our patronage anyway, whether we have a dog with us or not. There are a large percentage of RVers who travel with their pet and many campgrounds are happy to have us visit. So, Silverlabs says, GO FOR IT!
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Old 10-11-2016, 09:08 PM   #25
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We are among the folks that went the AS path so that we could take "our girls" (two golden retrievers) along. I'll mention a recent experience, and perhaps some of the more well traveled folks have some other environmental warnings to add.

We live in northern Wisconsin and I've never had my dogs south of the Twin Cities. I let them out for a walk in a vacant, but trimmed lot near Valentine, Nebraska, and all of sudden it was as if they had stepped on a griddle. They had both stepped on burrs that were right on the ground and stuck in their feet. We have all sorts of burs and stick-tights in our woods, but I'd never seen anything like these. They had very small yellow blooms and cluster of stickers not an inch off the ground. So rather than clinging to their legs or tail, they were stuck between the pads.

I spent the next hour pulling burs out of their feet and the rest of the trip inspecting the grounds before letting the dogs walk. I learned that if the grass was either green or long, we'd be okay. But if it was short and brown, it would have these instruments of torture mixed in.

Considering my own woods, the big threat is ticks and their attendant diseases. NexGard is, I think, the best deterrent/protection. The threat of bears and wolves as predators to pets is wildly overstated, but I still would not leave a dog unattended on a tether. Leashes are the best protection against the most common problems: porcupines and skunks. Quills in their mouth will probably need a vet. For a skunk we find washing in a mix of hydrogen peroxide + dawn dish detergent + baking soda. Tomato juice (often cited) is worthless. My mother tried it on my years ago, but hey, I couldn't go to school for two days. And finally, know how to open a leg trap without exchanging your freedom/limb for your dogs.

I don't want to deter you from a visit, it is a great and dog friendly region. But just as I was blind-sided by those burs, I would like you to know the dog hazards of my back yard.
Thanks,
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Old 10-12-2016, 08:04 AM   #26
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As to local dangers, beware in CA when hiking at elevations lower than 4,000' (other than the desert) of poison oak. If dogs roll in it, it won't hurt them a bit, but when they roll on you later, it could be a different story!
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Old 10-12-2016, 12:46 PM   #27
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We do have to protect our puppies from themselves. And we have to conform to all the campground and park rules for dogs.

Our beagle picked up "kennel cough" at one of the RV parks we stayed in. There is interaction with the other dogs during our walks around the campground. It tooks six month for the beagle to get healthy again. Don't let your dog interact with other dogs if he has a contagious disease.

And our beagle is like a horse, always head down and grazing. She will eat any piece of trash she finds. I try hard to prevent this. She is a beagle and sniff'in the ground is her best skill. That's what she does all the time. Eating something rotten has made her sick a couple of times.

Lastly beagles are trackers. A couple of times she has picked up a rabbit sent and takes off. This was in a 80 acre off leash dog park. We have to have her on a leash at all times lest she just runs off. Dumb beagle.

Traveling with our pet dogs has more responsibility than not having a dog. But the benefits (wagging tails( far outweigh the disadvantages.

David
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Old 10-12-2016, 03:00 PM   #28
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Travel with dogs

There are some good resources for those traveling with pets including http://petfriendlytravel.com/campgrounds that might help you decide where to stay when traveling with your pet. Several suggestions from our experience in traveling with a dog: 1) OK to leave your dog in the camper unattended IF IT IS NOT A BARKER - I love dogs and have been SO annoyed by camping neighbors who left their dog alone all day while it barked and howled for HOURS; 2) I used to think it was ok to tether my dog outside while we were out and about for just a short period (not for hikes, but to run to the restroom, etc); I learned my lesson the hard way when our dog was attacked by another dog while we were on a walk - ours was leashed, the other one was not (owners said he's always well behaved so no need to leash). Even with us being right there, our dog was injured. It could have been worse if he had been unattended for 5 minutes. 3) Be one of those dog owners who FOLLOW THE RULES - clean up after your dog, keep it leashed, don't let it bark .... so you and the rest of us will find more and more dog-friendly campgrounds! All that said, we have been traveling with our dog for 8 years, and 99% of our experience has been positive - go for it!!!
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