Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-02-2015, 09:55 PM   #211
2 Rivet Member
 
2013 25' FB Flying Cloud
Kuna , Idaho
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
Let's not have the debate again. Let's just learn something about Touaregs and Airstreams. Let it go guys, kindly go to a truck thread, we've heard enough of the cliche's.
Rude. The OP asking for opinions on the internet???????? Don't ask the question if you can't stand the answer............or it's not the answer you want. Geesh.
__________________

__________________
flyncloud is offline  
Old 09-02-2015, 09:57 PM   #212
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Mission , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 836
See that's the initial point ...
Nobody ever said no SUVs ever.
__________________

__________________
nrgtrakr is offline  
Old 09-02-2015, 11:35 PM   #213
3 Rivet Member
 
Mountain View , California
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 236
I would consider ProPride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jflipping View Post
We are going to be towing a 25 ft airstream with a 2014 toureg tdi.
Which hitch is the best??
Thanks
__________________
bono is offline  
Old 09-02-2015, 11:37 PM   #214
3 Rivet Member
 
Mountain View , California
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 236
OP did not ask for opinions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyncloud View Post
Rude. The OP asking for opinions on the internet???????? Don't ask the question if you can't stand the answer............or it's not the answer you want. Geesh.
__________________
bono is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 06:27 AM   #215
Rivet Master
 
Vintage Kin Owner
N/A , N/A
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 995
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tino643 View Post
... A got a new hitch is the Husky centerline. A add before the propride. A good system but heavy pricy and archaic! Whit my centerline, I don't have any sway at all!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by bono View Post
I would consider ProPride.
OP clearly stated that ProPriode is a good system, but heavy, pricey and archaic. He is using a Husky Centerline.

And I thought the "rules" state that OP's opinion was final and not debatable in this thread.
__________________
rostam is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 10:32 AM   #216
Rivet Master
 
cameront120's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
North Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,422
Images: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by rostam View Post
OP clearly stated that ProPriode is a good system, but heavy, pricey and archaic. He is using a Husky Centerline.

And I thought the "rules" state that OP's opinion was final and not debatable in this thread.
Bono was obviously responding to the question asked in post 218.
__________________
Cameron & the Labradors, Kai & Samm
North Vancouver, BC
Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! - Mame Dennis
cameront120 is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 08:02 PM   #217
It's Porsh-Ah
 
Franswa's Avatar
 
Boston , Massachusetts
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 22
Since I have been closet following this thread since I posted way back when, I would ask any one with a reinforced hitch to post a picture, I am writing this only to help people understand a little about what is going on back there, I will preface this by saying that I know most manufacturers skimp on their factory tow hitches, it's one of the first upgrades if your going to tow heavy, and this is because aftermarket weight distribution, anti-sway etc put a great deal of strain on a vehicle over long distances. But out of curiosity I looked up a picture of a reinforced cayenne/taurege hutch and found the accompanying picture. This could pose a problem. Hitches are fastened to the solid unsprung frame of a full frame vehicle, or the unit body of a unit body vehicle. In the picture this reinforcement is welded (maybe can't tell) to that very beefy looking sub frame assembly that holds the rear differential and acts as the fastening points for the rear suspension. It all seems good until you know about the vehicles and understand that the hitch is solidly bolted to the body, however the reinforcement is welded to a floating sub frame assembly. The sub frames on cayenne's and nearly every other unit body vehicle are floating assembly's with rubber bushings isolating road vibration. They move, plain and simple. The body acts as the frame, the suspension is attached to the sub frames at either end. A common repair for me is to lower the sub frame and replace bent sub frame bolts after a nasty impact with a pot hole. I use a jig that lines the sub frame up with the factory assembly line holes to reposition it. The sub frames are not rigidly mounted to the body, most Porsche's are split between solid rubber mounts, and hydraulic (think silicone filled) mounts depending on whether it's a cheap V6 or a Turbo. I'm trying to say that the component being used to reinforce the hitch isn't reinforcing anything, under extreme flex, it may transmit some force to the body, but your flexing the rear of the body shell likely. The point of this is just to let people know there is more to a vehicle than what the Web says. 
Name:   uploadfromtaptalk1441328516252.jpg
Views: 228
Size:  7.6 KB
__________________
Sent from under the bonnet of some rich guys Porsche
Franswa is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 08:29 PM   #218
4 Rivet Member
 
1994 34' Excella
Warren , Manitoba
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 346
Following this with interest. Have a 2009 Touareg gas, but if was a diesel would not be afraid to pull a 30' with it. Pull my 34' with a Duramax. Both vehicles weigh about the same, but the Touareg has far superior brakes. Use a Husky Centerline on the Duramax and love it. Head unit is heavy, but have pulled in some horrible winds with no problem. The combination of diesel Touareg and Husky Centerline will be a great combination. If I had a diesel in the VW would try to pull the 34!!! Chris
__________________
WBCCI #7394
2002 Chev 2500 HD Duramax
1976 31' Gone but fondly remembered
CBWELL is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 08:35 PM   #219
Rivet Master
 
Vintage Kin Owner
N/A , N/A
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 995
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franswa View Post
Since I have been closet following this thread since I posted way back when, I would ask any one with a reinforced hitch to post a picture, I am writing this only to help people understand a little about what is going on back there, I will preface this by saying that I know most manufacturers skimp on their factory tow hitches, it's one of the first upgrades if your going to tow heavy, and this is because aftermarket weight distribution, anti-sway etc put a great deal of strain on a vehicle over long distances. But out of curiosity I looked up a picture of a reinforced cayenne/taurege hutch and found the accompanying picture. This could pose a problem. Hitches are fastened to the solid unsprung frame of a full frame vehicle, or the unit body of a unit body vehicle. In the picture this reinforcement is welded (maybe can't tell) to that very beefy looking sub frame assembly that holds the rear differential and acts as the fastening points for the rear suspension. It all seems good until you know about the vehicles and understand that the hitch is solidly bolted to the body, however the reinforcement is welded to a floating sub frame assembly. The sub frames on cayenne's and nearly every other unit body vehicle are floating assembly's with rubber bushings isolating road vibration. They move, plain and simple. The body acts as the frame, the suspension is attached to the sub frames at either end. A common repair for me is to lower the sub frame and replace bent sub frame bolts after a nasty impact with a pot hole. I use a jig that lines the sub frame up with the factory assembly line holes to reposition it. The sub frames are not rigidly mounted to the body, most Porsche's are split between solid rubber mounts, and hydraulic (think silicone filled) mounts depending on whether it's a cheap V6 or a Turbo. I'm trying to say that the component being used to reinforce the hitch isn't reinforcing anything, under extreme flex, it may transmit some force to the body, but your flexing the rear of the body shell likely. The point of this is just to let people know there is more to a vehicle than what the Web says. Attachment 247230

Thanks for the informative post.
__________________
rostam is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 09:40 PM   #220
Rivet Master
 
dkottum's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Battle Lake , Minnesota
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 7,716
The Touareg hitch reinforcement is working well, according to Can-Am. They have set up 210 Touaregs when I asked them about it last month, and consider it one of the top Airstream tow vehicles, second to an Audi Q7.
__________________
Doug and Cheryl
2012 FC RB, Michelin 16, ProPride 1400
2016 Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4X4 Ecodiesel 3.92 axles

The Truth is More Important Than the Facts
dkottum is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 09:56 PM   #221
3 Rivet Member
 
Tuco's Avatar
 
1988 32' Excella
Ojai , California
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 189
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBWELL View Post
Following this with interest. Have a 2009 Touareg gas, but if was a diesel would not be afraid to pull a 30' with it. Pull my 34' with a Duramax. Both vehicles weigh about the same, but the Touareg has far superior brakes. Use a Husky Centerline on the Duramax and love it. Head unit is heavy, but have pulled in some horrible winds with no problem. The combination of diesel Touareg and Husky Centerline will be a great combination. If I had a diesel in the VW would try to pull the 34!!! Chris
I must be missing something. I keep seeing people here stating that the brakes are better on these SUV's than on a modern 3/4 ton and up diesel truck. I can see where the brakes may be better, but the braking ability is not. How can a vehicle without an exhaust brake be better than one with? I took time looking for an aftermarket exhaust brake for the smaller diesels and came up empty. If someone has a link to one I would love to check it out.
__________________
Dave & MJ
1988 32' Excella 1000 (Beauty)
1999 White Dodge SLT Laramie 3500 Dually, 4x4, 5spd, 5.9 CTD 245k+ (The Beast)
Tuco is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 10:09 PM   #222
New Member
 
Palm Springs , California
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 4
Thanks for all the useful info about which hitch is best!!!!
__________________
jflipping is offline  
Old 09-03-2015, 11:05 PM   #223
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Mission , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 836
Touareg weighs ~5,000#, 70-0mph 177 feet
An F250 weighs - 8,500#, 70-0mph 221 feet
Stopping distance shorter, agreed.
Better brakes, do the math.
__________________
nrgtrakr is offline  
Old 09-04-2015, 12:36 AM   #224
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franswa View Post
The sub frames are not rigidly mounted to the body, most Porsche's are split between solid rubber mounts, and hydraulic (think silicone filled) mounts depending on whether it's a cheap V6 or a Turbo. I'm trying to say that the component being used to reinforce the hitch isn't reinforcing anything, under extreme flex, it may transmit some force to the body, but your flexing the rear of the body shell likely. The point of this is just to let people know there is more to a vehicle than what the Web says.
I should start by saying that I don't know the details of the Porsche unibody and subframe, but it looks pretty similar to the approach BMW use and I am familiar with those models.

The receiver starts off as a standard Porsche part, so it is already designed to handle a vertical (tongue) load, as well as fore and aft loads relating to braking and acceleration. In Europe, those fore and aft loads relate to the use of surge brakes, and so would likely be greater than in North America. The receiver may require reinforcement due to a higher static tongue load, I don't know. But the purpose of the strut isn't any of those, it is simply to counteract the rotational moment of the WD equipment. That strut in your photo will see a vertical load, and not much else. So the question becomes, can the subframe handle a vertical load of a few hundred pounds (or many hundreds, depending on the specific setup), and what degree of motion of the original hitch assembly will be permitted due to the compliant mounting of the subframe. My guess is that the vertical load won't be an issue, and the question is whether the compliant mounts allow sufficient motion of the receiver to lead to fatigue of the rear mounting location. There is at least one more issue, that of noise transmission. The compliant mounts isolate the subframe, and the attachment may lead to increased cabin noise due to the new noise transmission path. Whether or not that is an issue would be determined on first use, I would think.

All of the above is speculation, so I would look to the company that has done several hundred of these, and see what the results have been. I would personally prefer to see the strut mounted to the unibody, all things being equal, if there was an appropriate and accessible mounting location. But if there wasn't, it appears the mounting location on the rear subframe is working for some number of owners.

Jeff
__________________

__________________
jcl is offline  
Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
VW Touareg diesel Never2late Tow Vehicles 8 06-17-2014 02:22 PM
Touareg and the Hensley question adwriter73 Tow Vehicles 3 10-25-2010 09:31 PM
touareg, bambi and weight distribution hitch ericwarren Hitches, Couplers & Balls 2 10-02-2008 10:19 PM
First road trip with Touareg and CCD... Xray Our Community 35 09-15-2004 02:06 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.