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Old 11-01-2009, 07:15 PM   #1
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Two axles vs. one axle

I've been towing a Globetrotter single axle trailer for over twenty years. I'm now considering buying a new Flying Cloud 23FB, a dual axle unit.

Can anyone advise me as to what to expect towing a dual axle trailer compared to a single axle rig?

Also, and this is critical, I have a long driveway with some pretty tight turns and I'm concerned the the new trailer won't clear some of the obstacles around the turns. The Globetrotter is 20'8" overall and 13'0" from hitch to axle center. The new rig is 23'9" overall and 13'0" from hitch to the space between the wheels, so the first axle is closer to the hitch than that on the Globetrotter.

So the question is how do I measure the turning moment? Is it from the hitch to the first axle, the center of the two axles or to the second axle?

A secondary concern is the overhang from the wheels to the rear of the trailer. I don't know the measurement of the new rig, but I know it's at least two feet longer than the Globetrotter. The rear overhang affects the outside radius of turns where the hitch to axle distance affects the inside radius of turns. I'm not sure which is more important, but my first concern is to figure out if I can negotiate the obstacles on the inside turns.

Any help would be appreciated.

Rick
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:42 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by farreach View Post
I've been towing a Globetrotter single axle trailer for over twenty years. I'm now considering buying a new Flying Cloud 23FB, a dual axle unit.

Can anyone advise me as to what to expect towing a dual axle trailer compared to a single axle rig?

Also, and this is critical, I have a long driveway with some pretty tight turns and I'm concerned the the new trailer won't clear some of the obstacles around the turns. The Globetrotter is 20'8" overall and 13'0" from hitch to axle center. The new rig is 23'9" overall and 13'0" from hitch to the space between the wheels, so the first axle is closer to the hitch than that on the Globetrotter.

So the question is how do I measure the turning moment? Is it from the hitch to the first axle, the center of the two axles or to the second axle?

A secondary concern is the overhang from the wheels to the rear of the trailer. I don't know the measurement of the new rig, but I know it's at least two feet longer than the Globetrotter. The rear overhang affects the outside radius of turns where the hitch to axle distance affects the inside radius of turns. I'm not sure which is more important, but my first concern is to figure out if I can negotiate the obstacles on the inside turns.

Any help would be appreciated.

Rick
Rick.

A tandem axle trailer handles many times better on the open roads, than a single axle. A tandem also greatly reduces the vertical movement of the coupler.

When backing a tandem, if you lower the front end as close to the ground as you can, the trailer will pivot on the front axle almost 100 percent. You can install a hitch box on the front of your TV, and have just a hitch bar with just a ball on it, to position the coach.

You will probably be able to move the new coach, using the above suggestion, easier than you ever could with the 22 footer.


Andy
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:43 PM   #3
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Welcome!

Welcome to the forums Rick, I won't be to much help here I have only pulled single axle Airstreams. When I compare a single axle Airstream to a few duel axle boat trailers I found that the ride of the duel axle trailer is more stable and when backing the duel axle is slower to respond when turning(this is good and bad).

The Flying Cloud 23F/B is a nice trailer.2010 Airstream Flying Cloud 23' FB
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Old 11-01-2009, 08:42 PM   #4
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Experience with 1-2-3 axles

We have experience with pulling (& backing) 1, 2, & 3 axle trailers.

As far as backing, the 1 axle trailer is really squirrel-ly ie it tends to cut faster & quicker than a 2 axle & sometimes seems to have a mind of its own.

There is not much difference between the 2 (31') & 3 (34') axle trailers, although there is a slight advantage to the 3 axle as when you back up, it tracks a bit better than the 2 axle. The 3 axle trailer is very civilized when backing up, provided you have the room

A lot depends on the style of hitch that you have as well - we've found that the hensley allows for a sharper angle when backing into tight spots. As well, if you have a receiver on the front as per Andy's suggestion, you can control a 2 axle better than a single axle.
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:34 PM   #5
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smaller trailers are much more sensitive to steering when backing up and that is primarily measured by the 13' you describe. It's a matter of how much distance at the ball will rotate the trailer angle.

The front hitch is a good idea for tight maneuvers for several reasons including (usually) shorter leverage ball to tow vehicle axle and direct steering. They usually aren't that expensive, either.

How tight you can turn depends upon the tow vehicle wheelbase plus the clearance you have before the tow vehicle binds on the trailer. I have pivoted a 24' trailer on a point between the two tires on one side, for instance, using a short wheelbase vehicle.

The width of the driveway usually provides enough room so you can avoid obstacles but you do have to plan things carefully and may need to do a bit of back-and-fill.
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Old 11-03-2009, 09:21 AM   #6
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Thanks guys for the help. I thought of a front end hitch on the TV before, but as I got better at backing, I worked out the problems I was having. Another advantage of the front end hitch system and that you have a good view of the trailer while moving it.

Rick
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