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Old 05-15-2018, 05:02 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by gruhl View Post
hi all,

i am new to this site and airstreaming as well. I have just purchased a 22fb airstream and will be towing it with a 2018 toyota tundra 1794 edition 4 wheel drive.

My question is do i need sway control and if so i would appreciate any reccomendations.

I towed the trailer from the dealership home which was about a 2 1/2 drive at 60 to 65 mph without issue.

Your feedback is very welcome and much appreciated.

Cheers,

greg
no!
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Old 05-15-2018, 05:42 PM   #16
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no!


Why not? Thanks!
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Old 05-16-2018, 06:28 AM   #17
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Hi

Once you figure out what it's looking for, you can get it to engage. Doing so may not be a smart thing to do, but it can be done. You are getting some fairly major sway at the point it engages. I have no idea how similar the systems are between manufacturers. I'd bet they all do similar things. Major motion drives differential braking and deceleration. Keep in mind that deceleration may *not* be the ideal solution to the problem ....

Why do crazy people dig into this kind of stuff? I like to know what the various systems do and what they "look like" when they engage. Yes, locking up the brakes in a big snowy / empty parking lot is also one of my occasional pastimes ....

Bob
The OEM control is slower to react than the TT-mounted TUSON electronic. See Andy Thomsons review.

The “other” problem exacerbated by BOF construction is body movement against the suspension. Better shock absorbers than OEM, replacing rubber bushings with poly on anti-roll bars, and addition of a rear Panhard Rod all make for better towing. Body & suspension don’t get out of whack with each other as easily.

It wouldn’t surprise me at all that the control reacts strongly. With a pickup, it’s almost always too late.

Tire pressure above what’s necessary for the load will also worsen the problem. As will a near empty bed.

The false security of today’s pickups is measured by millivolts and antilock rear brakes plus radial tires. A vehicle with bandages all over it straight off the showroom floor.

The weak link is using a pickup. A Hensley-design hitch, TT antilock disc brakes, and the TT mounted anti-sway are how to keep both pickup rear axle tires on the ground. Towing an AS is easy. Unless one chooses the tow vehicle that makes it difficult.

.
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Old 05-16-2018, 08:45 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Abraham View Post
Greg:

You didn't say if you have a weight distributing hitch. You only ask about sway control. The sway control is sometimes limited by the hitch design. If you already have a WD hitch, it may dictate what sway control you can add. Please advise if you already have hitch and what brand/type you have.

As you can see, there are many opinions out here. Some valid, some less so.

Welcome to the discussion.
Abe
No I do not have a WD hitch.
The trailer was level when i hooked it up and it had a full fresh water tank as well as 50% full on grey water and 25% on black water.

P.S> the dealership forgot to empty the tanks prior to me taking ownership, good thing it was clean water for testing the tanks :-)
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Old 05-16-2018, 08:50 AM   #19
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Can you shed some light on the no response?
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Old 05-16-2018, 09:35 AM   #20
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Obviously nobody NEEDS sway control. Just as nobody needs: blind spot monitors, adaptive cruise control, lane departure assist, stability control, anti-lock brakes, air bags, seat belts, or any of the other safety features that were not available in 1936, when Byam introduced the Airstream Clipper. The question is do you want it. Some do, some don’t.
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Old 05-16-2018, 10:49 AM   #21
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The 1936 velocity was no where near the 2018 towing velocity. If you maintain 1936 travel speed, then no. If you want to travel over 50 mph, get a weight distribution hitch with sway control and tune your lashup at a CAT scale. Pat
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Old 05-16-2018, 11:27 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by gruhl View Post
Hi All,

I am new to this site and Airstreaming as well. I have just purchased a 22FB Airstream and will be towing it with a 2018 Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition 4 wheel drive.

My question is do I need sway control and if so I would appreciate any reccomendations.

I towed the trailer from the dealership home which was about a 2 1/2 drive at 60 to 65 mph without issue.

Your feedback is very welcome and much appreciated.

Cheers,

Greg
I have a 2004 22 foot Safari. I have a 2014 Tundra 4x4. There is very little sway but there are a few instances where I have felt wind or semi truck/trailer 'push' when they passed me.

I use an Equalizer Brand Equalizer hitch and it provides some sway control with the equalizer bars. You can spend lots of money chasing hitches. On this website, I found some 13 years of discussion on EQUALIZER BRAND hitches. The most important post to me was one where the poster indicated that in 13 (or some large number) of years, the only time his Airstream shook violently and uncontrollably was when it was parked in his driveway during a severe earthquake.

That was all I needed, but I did read the full thread (which took a long time).

I have now gone 20,000 miles, and have had absolutely no problems. It is like the truck doesn't even know the trailer is back there.
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Old 05-16-2018, 11:39 AM   #23
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Yes, you are absolutely correct that this should be simply an engineering discussion. I am one. But you will see opinions that verge on hysteria and other irrelevancies when it comes to hitch systems. I know what works best for eliminating sway, but there are those who dismiss Hensley designs as “unnecessary” or “overkill” or “false security”. I’ve grown real tired of the silliness. It’s a darn fine design, my rig tows like it’s on rails, but there are still deniers. Like I said, it departs engineering, and heads straight to an advocacy and hostility that, to me, stinks of political or religious fervor. Individuals are entitled to have opinions, but this subject gets ridiculous real fast, it seems. Misinformation abounds, and positions get defended with silliness. It’s sad and frustrating.

In any case, I’ll tow with a Hensley design, namely ProPride, and the naysayers can do what they want....and don’t get me started on the folks that seem to be unable to understand how it works, how to use it, or how to work with it. It runs the gamut, and gives me deep concern about the ability of some to deal with properly towing anything...
This post and the one by Slowmover highlight people who are looking at the sway issue from a unique perspective. The sway issue is one that must consider both tow vehicle, trailer, and setup. Certainly Slowmover benefits from the Hensley design. His thumbnail shows he has a 35 (?) foot trailer.

I think you might consider which posters have trailers and tow vehicles similar to yours. They would most likely be what you would experience.
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Old 05-16-2018, 12:00 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Silver.Sanctuary View Post
This post and the one by Slowmover highlight people who are looking at the sway issue from a unique perspective. The sway issue is one that must consider both tow vehicle, trailer, and setup. Certainly Slowmover benefits from the Hensley design. His thumbnail shows he has a 35 (?) foot trailer.

I think you might consider which posters have trailers and tow vehicles similar to yours. They would most likely be what you would experience.
Absolutely correct. To understand and mitigate/prevent sway issues you have to look at the trailer, hitch system and tow vehicle as a complete system, not as a bunch of independent parts. Others have rightfully pointed out that tow vehicle suspension, tires, and shock absorbers also have effects on towing performance.

In my particular case, I have a 22 footer, and tow (with what I have) a crew cab 4x4 Toyota Tacoma. Admittedly the truck is a bit light and under-powered for my towing conditions--mountain passes in California.

With proper setup, tire pressure adjustments, and proper loading of the vehicle and trailer, I can tow safely. It takes fine-tuning of WD, for example, to get steering and braking stability, even with a Hensley design hitch. You have to understand and consider ALL the moving parts, then optimize the setup, balance, and adjustments on all the adjustable bits to get it right for a particular load and road conditions.
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Old 05-16-2018, 12:09 PM   #25
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Based on my own experience with a shorter trailer, you need sway control. I now have a 25' and it wasn't hairy without anti-sway but it was sooo much better with! I'm pulling with an 03 Dodge Dakota. Your Tundra is certainly more stable and if you do not go with anti-sway you will probably get home OK...but you will appreciate the difference with!

Assuming you didn't spend $3000 for a Hensley or Propride, your ball/hitch head has holes for a friction type anti-sway bar. You should add one to start and then if your rig is still a bit antsy then add the second. Can AM recommend two on all their set-ups! Husky anti-sway cost $85 Canadian... probably about $10.50 USF !!!!

JCW
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:12 AM   #26
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Obviously nobody NEEDS sway control. Just as nobody needs: blind spot monitors, adaptive cruise control, lane departure assist, stability control, anti-lock brakes, air bags, seat belts, or any of the other safety features that were not available in 1936, when Byam introduced the Airstream Clipper. The question is do you want it. Some do, some don’t.
A bit over simplified but OK I get your point. So are you saying you do not use either WD or swaycontrol?
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:16 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by JCWDCW View Post
Based on my own experience with a shorter trailer, you need sway control. I now have a 25' and it wasn't hairy without anti-sway but it was sooo much better with! I'm pulling with an 03 Dodge Dakota. Your Tundra is certainly more stable and if you do not go with anti-sway you will probably get home OK...but you will appreciate the difference with!

Assuming you didn't spend $3000 for a Hensley or Propride, your ball/hitch head has holes for a friction type anti-sway bar. You should add one to start and then if your rig is still a bit antsy then add the second. Can AM recommend two on all their set-ups! Husky anti-sway cost $85 Canadian... probably about $10.50 USF !!!!

JCW
Thank you, my truck is equiped with the following:

Integrated Trailer Brake Controller- this feature is standard and it allows drivers to adjust the amount of trailer braking based on the weight of the trailer. This helps the trailer to stop when the truck does.

Trailer-Sway Control-All Tundra models come standard with trailer-sway control. The system works in two ways, first by detecting trailer sway and applying brake pressure at individual wheels and second by controlling engine torque to stabilize the trailer.

However I think I will additional swaycontrol to be on the safe side.
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Old 05-17-2018, 08:06 AM   #28
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No I do not have a WD hitch.
The trailer was level when i hooked it up and it had a full fresh water tank as well as 50% full on grey water and 25% on black water.

P.S> the dealership forgot to empty the tanks prior to me taking ownership, good thing it was clean water for testing the tanks :-)
I have looked up the Toyota specs and it appears that it is similar to a GMC or chevy 1500 series truck in hauling and towing capacity. Since I have a GMC 1500 I can relate my experience. I would not want to tow any trailer more than about 1500 pounds without WD hitch and sway control. You can get away without in the best of conditions, but not in less than perfect conditions. I can't give you exact limits for your setup, as I don't have all the weights of everything. Most important is that you don't reduce your steering axel weight to the point of loss of steering stability. And high tongue weight will do that in some cases. That condition can also induce sway under some circumstances.

You should measure the loaded weight of the trailer, the tongue weight, and look up your vehicle limits for each axel and the hitch as well as the payload. Then you can know for sure what that your setup in safe and reliable.

There has been much discussion here on how to setup WD hitches and which ones are "best". Many of then work well, and some are better than others.
I happen to like the Reese Dual Cam sway control system on their Trunion bar WD hitch. It has worked well for me for 40 years, towing several different trailers with several different tow vehicles.

BTW, my current setup is a Chevy 2500 Diesel that outweighs my 25 ft Airstream. Inspires a lot of confidence when traveling in the mountains. And I still use WD hitch with sway control, properly adjusted for the current load.

Hope you find the right solution for your setup.

Abe
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