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Old 06-25-2012, 08:11 PM   #1
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I'm new to the forums and I'm in the process of trying to decide on a 23' versus a 19' International. I've been told double axels are easier to tow and maneuver but I haven't a clue. I apologize if this topic has been asked and answered a million times but I couldn't find it.

Thanks so much.
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Old 06-25-2012, 08:17 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by debdog2009 View Post
I'm new to the forums and I'm in the process of trying to decide on a 23' versus a 19' International. I've been told double axels are easier to tow and maneuver but I haven't a clue. I apologize if this topic has been asked and answered a million times but I couldn't find it.

Thanks so much.
Single axle trailers, make the tow vehicle rise and fall vertically.

Tandem axle trailers don't do that.

Bouncing up and down, because of the road is one thing, but when the trailer makes that happen, then it's time to change.

Andy
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Old 06-25-2012, 08:18 PM   #3
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I have two travel trailers, one 19 ft SOB ( a T@DA) and another which is a 27 FB Safari AS. My 19 ft is easier to tow because of the weight but my 27 FB is easier to back in. There are pros and cons to both. When I travel by myself my 19 ft is the one I take but if my husband comes along we take the 27 FB. As far as towing between a 19 ft and 23 ft AS I can't imagine that a double axle makes that much difference. Good luck in your decision.

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Old 06-25-2012, 08:22 PM   #4
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Double axle gives you 4 tires, if you get a single flat you can get to a nearby exit. Single axle only gives you 2 tires, get a flat and you are going to be fixing it right then and there. Also get a bit more braking power.

My personal preference is a double axle trailer whenever I can.

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Old 06-25-2012, 10:32 PM   #5
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A double/tandem axle gives a lot more stability as the trailer resists turning/twisting and will track better on the highway. On pavement, backing in at sharp angles isn't super hard with a tandem, but you definitely will get some tire scrub action. On dirt or gravel it's not as noticeable.

I've towed a smaller single axle, and now a smaller tandem... I can't say if the number of axles is the main factor, or if having a much longer trailer makes it seem more stable. Given the option, I looked for the smallest tandem axle I could find, which in the vintage I bought was the 22' International. Because I often travel far from service centres, having the extra axle and tires is worth it just in case I have to limp to the next stop.
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:46 PM   #6
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Thanks everyone for the replies. I've never towed ANYTHING so this is all very new to me. I appreciate all of your insight.

Debra
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Old 06-25-2012, 11:06 PM   #7
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A tandem axle trailer is deffinitely a plus when a tire fails.

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Old 06-25-2012, 11:52 PM   #8
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I have towed thousands of miles with single axle AS products (AS and Argosy) and more thousands of miles with double axle 25' AS trailers. I have no real preference. The extra axle and tires are more expensive to replace (axels eventually) and scrub more in tight turns. A blowout on either is not a great experience, but with a single you must fix it now and where you are, with a double you can tow it to a safer spot at low speed. And yes, I have had blowouts on both types. However the goal is to never have a blowout, as they do major damage to either kind of trailer. My feeling is that either will tow well, and ride well. Yes, a pothole will bounce a single more than a double but again, I don't consider it a big deal. Set up properly with a good Weight Distributing hitch will make either a pleasure to tow.

Pick the trailer you like and don't worry about the axels would be my overall advice.
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Old 06-25-2012, 11:55 PM   #9
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For me, backing is more a matter of length. Our 27 foot boat is easy to back, mainly because everything moves slower (turning). When we first got our 19 foot Bambi, I had a real time backing, because it swung so fast; and because of the rounded corners. It's hard to judge the angle in backing when there are no square references. However, one adjusts with more experience.

As far as towing, I prefer a single axle. There's fewer wheel bearings to pack and fewer tires to replace. However, a blowout is a big problem with only one tire on each side. I think we have resolved this problem by switching to tires that are much more reliable than the original Goodyear Marathons. I anticipate that the LT tires we have now will make tire maintenance and repair more like the ones on our tow vehicle; and I don't think blowouts will be a regular part of towing anymore, barring unavoidable road hazards.
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Old 06-26-2012, 08:47 AM   #10
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I too prefer a single axle. Better gas mileage and I find them easier to back. They do have shorter turn radius. Yes, I've had a blowout but it wasn't the horror story others relate. Those are the same people who would have you believe you can't tow witout a diesel.
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Old 06-26-2012, 09:34 PM   #11
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I'd always much rather have a tandem than a single when it comes to TT's. Any extra work or expense is moot. Tracking, braking, backing and ride are simply far better with a tandem.

That said, if the best trailer was a single it wouldn't stop me. This is the consideration that matters.

Best tires, best brakes and best brake controllers and hitch rigging are mandatory for any TT, IMO.

.
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Old 06-26-2012, 11:44 PM   #12
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Greetings debdog2009!

Welcome to the Forums!

After my first travel trailer, a 1980 Nomad 1780 light-weight 17' single axle trailer, I thought that I would never consider another single axle trailer. What I learned after purchasing my 1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre, was that a well-designed and well-balanced single axle travel trailer does not have to be a towing nightmare. I have never had a flat tire or blow out on either my Airstream or Argosy, but I had a catastrophic blow out on my Nomad when it was less than two years old that threw my rig into a 360 degree skid on a busy two-lane secondary highway . . . just missed being hit by a heavily loaded semi-trailer truck . . . the experience was such that I wouldn't even consider a single axle trailer until I ran across my Minuet in 2005.

I am very particular about the tires on my Minuet as I am determined to avoid blow outs. My coach's tires are replaced when they are four years old, and I have avoided both flats and blow outs thus far. The plus for me is that the Minuet can be towed by both my 1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible as well as my 1985 Oldsmobile Delta 88 Royale Brougham Luxury Sedan. The single axle Minuet is well balanced with 15% plus on the tongue which insures that the coach is stable when towing. I have towed my Minuet through nearly every state West of the Mississippi, and have never experienced any issue that can be attributed to its status as a single axle trailer . . . it has been a dream to tow under every condition that I have encountered.

My Argosy has restored my confidence in single axle travel trailers. I now realize that a coach's balance as well as having at least 12% of the coach's weight on the tongue can make for a pleasurable towing experience with a single axle coach. A single axle coach can be a little more prone to sway particularly when the coach's weight approaches or exceeds that of the tow vehicle. My modest investment in a Reese Strait-Line Hitch with Dual Cam Sway Control solved any concerns that I had about sway with my Minuet.

Good luck with your investigation and research!

Kevin
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Old 06-27-2012, 08:58 AM   #13
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Overlander64, well said. I can say the same for our '08 22' Safari Sport.
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Old 06-28-2012, 09:15 PM   #14
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Once again, thanks for all of the responses!
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