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Old 12-30-2015, 12:03 AM   #29
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Single axle trailers tend to be MUCH more "bouncy" than two axle trailers.
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Old 12-30-2015, 12:06 AM   #30
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Towing with the 4.6L Tundra

TEXTIN
I chose double axles because there is much less weight on each tire.

I tow with a 2013 Tundra double cab 4.6L and have the following suggestions. First verify that you have the tow package. it is a must. Next you will need tow mirrors and a brake controller. I have the factory slide out mirrors which are nice, but, wish they slid out another 6" and my Argosy is narrower than a newer Airstream. I mounted my brake controller in the center cubby hole between the lighters above the console. It is out of the way, visible and easy to reach and I feel a better location than over the drivers leg. I did, however, have to lengthen the controller cable to put it there.

As to towing. My Argosy is 4,300 lb empty and I tow at about 6,000 lbs. My tongue weight is 550 lb and it has 1 yr old Michelin 15" LTX M/S 2 tires rated at 2,200 lbs (less 10% for trailer use) and 112 mph. I am not concerned about going over 65 mph.

The 4.6L Tundra has highway gearing and in tow/haul on flat ground (in Texas) mine tows easily at 70-75 mph and I get 11.5 mpg. It actually tows more comfortably at 70 than 60 because of the gearing. Against strong headwinds (40 mph gusts) its down to 65 mph and working at about 3,000 rpm (4th gear) and gets 10.5 mpg. Last year going up Rattan Pass in CO (10% grade smooth 4 lane hwy.) it was comfortable at 50 mph at 3,500 rpm (probably 3rd gear). At lower speeds on steep mountain roads it shifted a lot but did the job. I don't think I would want to drive over the Rockies and I would not want to tow a heavier trailer.

The 2012/13 4.6L double cab is rated at 8,600 lb towing, but, it is interesting that in 2014 this combination was reduced to 6,800 lb. It is a good recommendation that you be 10-20% below the rated capacity.

I would suggest in addition to the number of axles and interior configuration, take a good look at the loaded weight. Lighter will be better. Good luck with the Airstream you select.
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Old 12-30-2015, 01:34 AM   #31
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I would feel safer with dual axles because of braking power and weight capacity. That said I would buy mostly on floor plan. If both configurations had good floor plans I'd go with dual axle unless you knew you had to make real sharp turns for some reason. Leland
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Old 12-30-2015, 03:41 AM   #32
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Tire quality and TPMS now-a-days make single axles a viable choice. Then consider axle load. extra weight, double cost in tires and brakes. skufing. etc. I've a 1958 22' Caravanner and have owned a 1968 31' w/double axles. I prefer my single axle. I wish I could have found the older 26'ers of the 1950's w/the single axle. The extra 4' would have been nice. I also favor an axle w/springs (better longevity)
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Old 12-30-2015, 06:23 AM   #33
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[QUOTE=rvb;1729324]TEXTIN


The 4.6L Tundra has highway gearing and in tow/haul on flat ground (in Texas) mine tows easily at 70-75 mph and I get 11.5 mpg. It actually tows more comfortably at 70 than 60 because of the gearing. Against strong headwinds (40 mph gusts) its down to 65 mph and working at about 3,000 rpm (4th gear) and gets 10.5 mpg. Last year going up Rattan Pass in CO (10% grade smooth 4 lane hwy.) it was comfortable at 50 mph at 3,500 rpm (probably 3rd gear). At lower speeds on steep mountain roads it shifted a lot but did the job. I don't think I would want to drive over the Rockies and I would not want to tow a heavier trailer.


According to the Colorado Highway dept. website , the grade on Raton Pass is 6%
I'm sure there are others but the only 10% I can recall in the lower 48 is on Teton Pass between Idaho and Wyoming just west of Jackson Hole .
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Old 12-31-2015, 10:41 AM   #34
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corrected

[QUOTE=dannydimitt;1729361]
Quote:
Originally Posted by rvb View Post
TEXTIN


The 4.6L Tundra has highway gearing and in tow/haul on flat ground (in Texas) mine tows easily at 70-75 mph and I get 11.5 mpg. It actually tows more comfortably at 70 than 60 because of the gearing. Against strong headwinds (40 mph gusts) its down to 65 mph and working at about 3,000 rpm (4th gear) and gets 10.5 mpg. Last year going up Rattan Pass in CO (10% grade smooth 4 lane hwy.) it was comfortable at 50 mph at 3,500 rpm (probably 3rd gear). At lower speeds on steep mountain roads it shifted a lot but did the job. I don't think I would want to drive over the Rockies and I would not want to tow a heavier trailer.


According to the Colorado Highway dept. website , the grade on Raton Pass is 6%
I'm sure there are others but the only 10% I can recall in the lower 48 is on Teton Pass between Idaho and Wyoming just west of Jackson Hole .
It was easier than I expected though it was long grade. I stand corrected.
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Old 01-08-2016, 03:13 PM   #35
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[QUOTE=dannydimitt;1729361]
Quote:
Originally Posted by rvb View Post
TEXTIN


The 4.6L Tundra has highway gearing and in tow/haul on flat ground (in Texas) mine tows easily at 70-75 mph and I get 11.5 mpg. It actually tows more comfortably at 70 than 60 because of the gearing. Against strong headwinds (40 mph gusts) its down to 65 mph and working at about 3,000 rpm (4th gear) and gets 10.5 mpg. Last year going up Rattan Pass in CO (10% grade smooth 4 lane hwy.) it was comfortable at 50 mph at 3,500 rpm (probably 3rd gear). At lower speeds on steep mountain roads it shifted a lot but did the job. I don't think I would want to drive over the Rockies and I would not want to tow a heavier trailer.


According to the Colorado Highway dept. website , the grade on Raton Pass is 6%
I'm sure there are others but the only 10% I can recall in the lower 48 is on Teton Pass between Idaho and Wyoming just west of Jackson Hole .

Just don't forget that if you are running ST type tires they have a max speed rating of 65 mph unless there is a speed symbol on the tire sidewall.. That is not an average but max.
If you choose to exceed that maximum I trust we will not hear complaints about tire failures from those making the decision to ignore the design limits of most ST type tires
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Old 01-08-2016, 05:06 PM   #36
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As others have said, choosing your trailer based on the number of axles it has is confusing (to me). When we purchased our Airstream, even used prices put us up toward the top of our limits. Getting a trailer that met our needs, and wants, was first and foremost. We did not want a trailer with a bed crunched into a corner where one of us had to crawl over the other to get in or out. I was also surprised that Airstream did not put in a double door refrigerator until you got up to a 25.

The number of axles had nothing to do with our decision. I think single axle trailers are just fine as are double axle trailers. As in all things, just make sure your equipment is in good shape and that you don't tow faster than is safe. Saying you can't back a dual axle around a tight corner is rather silly. We do it all the time.

Get what you want. Don't let the axle choice alone steer you.
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Old 01-13-2016, 10:29 AM   #37
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One axle or two you still need to know which end of which axle carries the greater load.

Only a very small % of TT have the load eavenly split between all the tires and if you simply divide the total weight by the number of tires you may be overloading one tire without knowing it.

Remember...The data indicates that there is a better than 50% probability that you have a tire and / or axle in overload based on the results of tens of thousands of RV weightings.
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Old 02-01-2016, 05:21 PM   #38
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Slumgullion pass from Lake City east is 11%
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Old 02-02-2016, 06:10 AM   #39
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Slumgullion Pass, elevation 11,530 ft (3,510 m), is a mountain pass in Colorado traversed by State Highway 149 east of Lake City. The north side has the steepest grade of any continuously paved road in Colorado (9%), but the pass does not close often in winter because snowplows clear the route regularly during this season. It has a few switchbacks and tight spots, but other than that, most travelers will find it an easy, scenic route.[citation needed]
Technically speaking, the current highway does not traverse the true Slumgullion Pass, which lies just off the highway on the ridge between Cebolla Creek and the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River, at an elevation of about 11,300 ft (3,400 m).[2] As a result of a realignment several decades ago (evident by comparing USGS topographic maps of different vintages), the road now takes a shorter but somewhat higher route as it travels east and south from this spot toward Spring Creek Pass. The road sign at the high point refers to Slumgullion Summit rather than Slumgullion Pass in order to reflect this.
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Old 02-02-2016, 11:46 AM   #40
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Thanks for the correction.
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Old 02-02-2016, 12:58 PM   #41
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Number of axles

A single axle anything, will have a large vertical movement at the coupler. That it turn, lifts the back end of the tow vehicle up and down.

A two axle trailer, minimizes that vertical movement to a large degree.

A tri-axle Airstream has almost zero vertical movement at the coupler.

Andy
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