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Old 04-11-2013, 03:34 PM   #1
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1964 22' Safari
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Newb, NEED to MOVE dormant '64, 22' LAND YACHT

Hello all,

I have a '64 22' Land yacht I need to move from central to southern Ca.About 300 miles. I'm curious about preemptive medicine I should consider for the ride .

It has sat for at least 10 yrs and may sit for another 10 upon it's destination. I'd just like an uneventful trip.

  • tires, I'm sure a must replacement (specs, single axel 15" 6 lug)Suggestions?
  • Wheel Bearings?? Should I worry, I think it's been pretty stationary all it's life
  • -Brakes; does it have them, mechanical?, do I need them for this journey? Truck has 3+3+2+2 pistons on 4 calipers + a smattering of low gears. If necessary, cheap & effective set up.
  • Tail lights; Likely to work, If not, likely failure points? (Harbor freight and tools set a fair, temp alternative route?
All I want is as uneventful ride as possible. Getting it here is the only real issue for now. Sort of an emergency, my house burnt down. need temp digs.



Thanks All, D-
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:21 PM   #2
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Sorry about your house. Was there a larger fire, eg, forest fire or something?

Yes, you need tires, load range D. As a single axle trailer, tires are the #1 safety item. For 300 miles, you can get the least expensive available. If you're gutsy, you might even find used tires that can hack it.

If this is just one trip of 300 miles, you can tow for 10 miles and then get out and feel the axle hubs to see if they are hot. The down side of skipping this maintenance is you might find yourself on the side of the highway greasing your bearings. If things go well at 10 miles, check again at 50. I know it's a pain to remove your wheels, but there are only two of them.

Your truck sounds capable of providing all the brakes you need, under normal conditions. Just don't get caught too close or going too fast downhill. Your trailer should have electric brakes, but you need a controller in the truck. As long as the trailer is light, no water or other stuff, you will be OK if you take it easy and always leave a lot of room in front. This is a very light trailer when empty, about 2400 lbs (max is 3100 lbs).

the tail lights in the trailer probably work, if you have the right 7-pin connector/umbilical. Just check the bulbs. If they don't, it will be easier to fix them than to string up the harbor freight stuff.

Let us know how it turned out.

Zep
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:47 PM   #3
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i would look into having it flat bedded on a low boy.
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:27 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeppelinium View Post
Sorry about your house. Was there a larger fire, eg, forest fire or something?
Thanks, A bum extension cord an a conglomeration of just a few pieces of junk...


Would it be worth just getting a set of bearing and doing a preemptive strike,expensive? or is there more to it?

The truck has a towing capcity of 8000 lbs. I assume that means it could stop 8000 lbs to, or at least 3000. there won't really be much inside it. Can I live gently without electric brakes? I could only find a 4 prong plug near the tow hitch.

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Originally Posted by Zeppelinium View Post

Let us know how it turned out.

Zep
I'll report back...or you'll read about it, Thanks much for the reply, D-
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:54 PM   #5
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Thats a thought I've considered. Any clue as to the cost? SLO to O.C (about 200Mi)


Regards, D-
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Old 04-11-2013, 06:02 PM   #6
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i don't know but others here are familiar with it.

if you do it yourself, make sure you address the bearings before you tow it. a bearing failure can ruin the spindle and cost you $$$ plus a flatbed tow. brakes are likely required by law along with a functioning break-away system, safety chains and lights.
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:55 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by dislexeea2 View Post
tires, I'm sure a must replacement (specs, single axel 15" 6 lug)Suggestions?
Check for used tires.

If none are available get the cheapest ones that will carry the weight. If you're really just towing once I would suggest getting bias ply tires matching the size and rating of those already on the trailer. There is a slightly higher risk of a blowout but the price is lower. If money is no object you can get something better.

Quote:
  • Wheel Bearings?? Should I worry, I think it's been pretty stationary all it's life

They should be removed, inspected, repacked, and reinstalled with new seals. 300 miles is a long way on doubtful bearings.


Quote:

  • -Brakes; does it have them, mechanical?, do I need them for this journey? Truck has 3+3+2+2 pistons on 4 calipers + a smattering of low gears. If necessary, cheap & effective set up.

It has them and you need them. Chances are they're shot and will have to be replaced. Check into new backing plate assemblies which should have everything you need for around $125 a side.


Get a cheap brake controller or borrow one from someone who tows


I hear what Zep is saying and there is some truth in it but I personally would not take the risk for a 300 mile trip.


Quote:

Tail lights; Likely to work, If not, likely failure points? (Harbor freight and tools set a fair, temp alternative route?

They might work, might not, temporary ones are a reasonable alternative. Remember that magnetic mounts don't work on aluminum.
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:59 PM   #8
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Before you spend money and time on bearings, tires , ect I would find out how much it would cost to have a flatbed haul it for you. I rescued a vintage trailer last summer and spent hours getting it ready to tow. I went and removed tires got news one went back with new tires repacked bearings got temp lights rigged up ect. On the way home a brake drum started rubbing on the backing plate, well it got red hot blew out my new tire and darn near caught the trailer on fire. There I was 9:00 at night on the side of the road calling a flatbed. Why go to all the work with a risk of problems to move it once? If you can get it hauled I would do it in a heartbeat. What happens if you wreck it or hurt someone?
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Old 04-12-2013, 02:11 AM   #9
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Newb, NEED to MOVE dormant '64, 22' LAND YACHT

Greetings dislexeea2!

Welcome to the Forums and the world of 1964 Airstream ownership!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dislexeea2 View Post
I have a '64 22' Land yacht I need to move from central to southern Ca.About 300 miles. I'm curious about preemptive medicine I should consider for the ride .

It has sat for at least 10 yrs and may sit for another 10 upon it's destination. I'd just like an uneventful trip.

  • tires, I'm sure a must replacement (specs, single axel 15" 6 lug)Suggestions?
There are two good reasons to consider new wheels for your 1964 Airstream . . . the first being that you will have wheels of known quality and weight carrying capacity . . . the second being there is a high probability that the coach may have split-rims as many 1964 Airstreams came equipped in this manner according to my notes. The specifications for the wheels utilized on the 1964 Airstreams as well as most Airstreams for the past 50 years are as follows:
  • 15"x6"
  • zero offset
  • 6 lug pattern
  • 5.5" spacing
  • center bore measuring 4.245 inches
  • rated at 2,600 pounds
The wheel is a comparatively common trailer applications. My local Good Year tire dealer stocked new rims having the correct specifications as did a horse trailer dealer and an agricultural trailer dealer. New rims from either of the three sources that I tried were less than $15.00 per wheel more for a brand new known quality wheel compared to a salvage yard wheels that could be in less than optimum condition. The center bore diameter can also pose problems as many otherwise compatible salvage yard wheels will have center bores that are too small and prove problematic when trying to mount the wheels/tires. The usual tire size recommended today is an ST or LT 225 75 R 15 in at least load range C or no more than load range D on a Vintage coach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dislexeea2 View Post
  • Wheel Bearings?? Should I worry, I think it's been pretty stationary all it's life
It would be extremely risky to consider towing the trailer with bearings that may not have been serviced in a decade or more. While the grease doesn't wear out, it has likely become contaminated with moisture from sitting. A spun bearing can cause thousands of dollars in damage if the wheel separates from the spindle even before considering the danger that a rouge wheel and tire could pose to other travelers on the road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dislexeea2 View Post
  • -Brakes; does it have them, mechanical?, do I need them for this journey? Truck has 3+3+2+2 pistons on 4 calipers + a smattering of low gears. If necessary, cheap & effective set up.
A 1964 single axle Airstream should have 12" Kelsey Hayes electric drum brakes. The parts are still readily available, but the easiest solution if the brakes need replacement is to install "fully-loaded-backing-plates" that include all new hardware/wear components. This is another good reason to repack the wheel bearings as it will give you the opportunity to fully inspect the brakes as well.

The brakes are likely required by state law for a trailer the size of the Airstream you will be towing. In addition, operable trailer brakes will also be extremely helpful if the trailer should begin to sway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dislexeea2 View Post
  • Tail lights; Likely to work, If not, likely failure points? (Harbor freight and tools set a fair, temp alternative route?
I may have been overly lucky, but all I have had to do is rewire the trailer's Bargman 7-pole connector on both my Overlander and Minuet when I towed them home for the first time. Each of my trailers had different wiring patterns as delivered by Airstream, and neither matched the industry standard in use today. I am attaching a pdf that contains the original 1964 Airstream schematic for our coaches.

My suggestion would be to carry a trailer connector that matches the one on your tow vehicle, then plan on wiring in the new connector on the Airstream. You are likely to find that bulbs are burned out or sockets corroded on some lights, but I was able to address those issues on both of my coaches in less than an hour when preparing for the first tow home. If there are unusual problems with the trailer running lights, there is a junction box for the 7-pole connector in the belly pan . . . it is in the front curbside corner . . . it is covered by a square or rectangular access panel that may be attached with either sheet metal screws or rivets.

I hope that you are as pleasantly surprised by the minimal problems that the first tow home can provide. In each of my first tows home, I stopped at least once every 50 miles for a walk-around the trailer and tow vehicle looking for wheels/tires/hubs that were warmer than their peers as well as evidence of impending problems such as loose panels or access hatches. A supply of Duct Tape or Gorilla Tape is quite handy as well as some bungee cords to use in the event that an acess panel or hatch needs to be secured.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 7wayplug1964-65.pdf (28.3 KB, 18 views)
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:00 AM   #10
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If your new trailer is going to sit for ten years after purchase, why spend $$ rehabbing it? The several thousand you would spend would probably be less than to have it hauled
Previous posters suggestions about attending to tires and bearings are good. Since the trailer is so light I would go with no brakes for 300 miles towing on the flat remembering that emergency stopping distances are much increased.
Trailer may be small and light enough to get on a conventional flatbed tow truck. If so, your only chore would be determining the height of the unit and getting it under the underpasses on your route.
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Old 04-12-2013, 06:18 PM   #11
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Thanks all,

Lots of food forr thought.

Im' kind'a inclined for a little adventure. Seems like bearings, tires (I have a near new set but on the wrong 5 lug rims)so maybe rims to. and make sure I have lights.

The question would be, cost; wheels, bearings tire mounting and screwing around with the electrical, versus a 300 mile tow.

Dont' laugh but my rig is a... VW....Toeuureg . V8, 6+ speed, huge brakes and an 8000lbs towing capacity.It has a locking dif + all kinds automatic traction and stability control. Never pushed and thought this might be a fun opportunity.

Question is, I'm lean,whats the most cost effective way to move this thing?

Thanks again, D-
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Old 04-16-2013, 07:40 AM   #12
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Thats hard to really say. I bought new tires and spent a bunch of time and still had to have it hauled home so for me having it hauled would have been cheapest. You need to find out the cost for hauling it and compare it to your parts cost and what your time is worth. Good luck
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Old 04-17-2013, 03:23 PM   #13
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Thats hard to really say. I bought new tires and spent a bunch of time and still had to have it hauled home so for me having it hauled would have been cheapest. You need to find out the cost for hauling it and compare it to your parts cost and what your time is worth. Good luck
,
Well dang, any clue as to the cost to haul (I assume trailer specialized hauler) a tailor....per mile? I mean dang, this thing is a and assume made to be trailer, made to be towed.....

the best,

D-
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:07 PM   #14
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Richinny's advice about the hitch would be ignored at your peril!

If you don't flat-bed this AS professionally (from the sound of things) I would recommend you take if for a short trial run after your upgrading but before hitting the road, on some non-busy streets at a low traffic time of day, possibly with someone else driving behind you and hands-off cell phones or walkie-talkies at the ready.

Just a cautionary tale about what can happen.....

Two years ago we picked up a small vintage trailer in northern Idaho for our son and daughter-in-law, and towed it down to Colorado for them. We first dropped it off at the nearby RV service center in Idaho and had them inspect it for roadworthiness, even though the previous owners (Christians, at that) said it worked fine. It turned out that this trailer also had the aforementioned tire problems.

We subsequently had no difficulties towing the thing down to Colorado, but once we got ready to camp with our family in RMNP and were driving behind them on our way out of town, the electrical plug disengaged so the trailer had no brake lights. Because their tow vehicle was configured differently than ours, the cord was too short for them to turn tightly. Then the trailer door (which never latched well) swung open. All of this occurred while driving through Boulder rush hour traffic.

Fortunately the two passengers were communicating via cell phone and we were both able to pull over into a parking lot. We duct-taped the door shut and switched to towing the trailer again with our truck.

We had a good camping trip, but I don't like to think what could have happened had we not been driving right behind them.
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