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Old 06-14-2014, 06:04 PM   #21
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Thanks rodsterninfl... Is part of my limitation my tires? Would upgrading my tires help considerably? I see f150's pulling larger loads than what I will be towing all the time.
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:18 PM   #22
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Don't worry, I was confused until I started learning and reading (thanks to all the fine knowledge here). Turns out that a vehicle's payload capacity is equally as important (if not more) than it's towing capacity. Towing capacity is a theoretical number, and at times a bit of a sales gimmick. (But there are guys towing with mini-vans who will argue otherwise, I'm still confused)

There was another guy on here J something that was crying up a storm in a couple threads because he bought his Ecoboost model had a 1200lb payload and he found once he hooked up his larger trailer (which still weighed less than the vehicles theoretical towing capacity) he couldn't add his wife, dog and a generator to his vehicle without being over payload capacity.

But you know, as others have stated depends how much you are carrying with you, carrying in the bed, or in the trailer. I think this is part of the reason so many guys are quick to suggest the larger trucks.

But if you're just going for a weekend you'll be fine. We're going full-time so it's been a struggle for me to determine the best payload, because I personally don't want a giant F250 or 2500 with huge long wheel base.
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:22 PM   #23
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Thanks Mikekey

Do better tires help my payload?
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:22 PM   #24
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Tires do make a difference but the figure is not just about tires rather the trucks build options. Check your tires for load rating D or E and the pounds of load they can take. Is your F150 a super crew? If so it weighs about 5300 lbs or so divided by four then consider the tires load max, what is left divided by four again? That is their load rating for the truck plus the tow load (tongue) You should be fine since they should have equipped the truck with tires that can take the truck and its maximum payload.
Not necessarily. Yes you need load rated tires but most likely the tires on your truck are original? If so, they HAD to be rated for the truck and its payload rating. Ford includes gas in its weight figures. Each truck is built with different specs, springs, packages, etc. Their PAYLOAD rating differs because of that as does the towing rating. These two figures are critical to towing. The very reason some trailer owners debate this is over the payload rating the achilles heal of a 1/2 ton truck and towing RVs. Many step up to 250 trucks because of payload. Towing capacity is no problem. They can pull the weight all day. The bearing weight (payload) is different though. You just have to check your tires. Your hitch, payload are to spec. You have a 363 pound figure for people (with some fudging for more perhaps). The payload figure is what salespeople are completely ignorant of with regard to TOWING. Tires will not change what your truck is designed to carry. They have an impact as they have to be able to carry the load as well but...I hope this helps.
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:24 PM   #25
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Yes, thanks rodsterinfl
... I had no idea... I'm glad I didn't get the 28' airstream!!!!!
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:39 PM   #26
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I've added Bilstein shocks on the entire truck... Does that help my payload capacity...

... Sorry for sounding like an UTTER iDIOT... But I'm a bit shocked.
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:41 PM   #27
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There are many options and choices. To say that I think you're good to go with what you have would be irresponsible on my part. The stickers tell part of the story... The hitch sticker shows the design limits of the receiver when used with a dead weight or a weight distributing hitch. It does not imply that the tow vehicle is designed to handle the maximum load. The door sticker shows the maximum design load for each axle and the simple combined total for the vehicle but it does not list the towing capacity. In simple terms, the tow limit factors in the vertical load the truck is designed to support with the trailer attached and the horizontal load the drivetrain, steering and brakes sustain while pulling and stopping the trailer. Passengers, gear, etc., have to be accounted for.

I would start here: http://www.forestriverinc.com/downlo...wGuide2012.pdf

This page lists among all the others, the various F150 combinations including the differently equipped 3.5l Ecoboost 2012 models. You will see that depending on how the Ecoboost is configured, an F150 may be rated to tow from about 8000# to over 11,000#.

The next step is to find some public scales nearby. Try to pick a time when they aren't busy as a courtesy to working drivers who need to get on and be on their way. Truck stops often have scales and for about $10 or so you can get weighed. These scales are often segmented so you pull on so that your steer axle is on the 1st segment, the drive axle on the 2nd and the trailer axle(s) on the 3rd. If you need to make adjustments, you pull off, do what you need and come back for a reweigh. Sometimes they will only charge a buck or 2 for each reweigh on that scale within 24 hours. If you're near a farming area, many ag business have scales. These are often single platforms, so some math is needed. You pull up so that only the steer axle is weighed and recorded, then pull forward to get steer and drive. The difference will be the load on the drive axle. Then pull forward and get the total. Subtracting the steer and drive from the gross will give you what's on the trailer axle(s). In some areas, DOT weigh stations leave their scales on when they are closed. You probably don't want to run through the DOT scales when they're open, but if you assistant can see and record the readings for you while you drive on and off, this can be a freebie. Scales of this caliber typically have a resolution of 20#, so you will notice that all readings will end in some multiple of 20 and that is close enough for what you need.

Getting weights of your pickup solo and again with the TT in tow will provide valuable info. You also want to have your truck and trailer loaded pretty much as you would normally travel, full tank of gas, passengers, gear, groceries, propane, etc.

Now you can compare your numbers with those posted on your stickers to ensure you aren't exceeding any axle limits. Also, compare your solo truck axle weights with those you get with the trailer attached. Without a WD hitch, you will see most of the hitch weight is appled to the rear axle. What you don't want to see is a reduction of the weight on the steer axle.

This is where the weight distributing hitch comes in. Through leverage it redistributes the load placed on the rear axle so some of it is shared with the steer axle and some with trailer axle(s). When properly set up, the pickup will retain a level aspect front to rear after loading or possible a slight lowering of the rear with relation to the front and the trailer will be level front to rear. Now for the anti-sway component. Passing big rigs, especially those coming the other way on 2-lane roads can induce a sway in the trailer. Many factors will determine how bad the sway can become. Speed and driver skill and reaction can mitigate or compound sway. In the worst case, the whole rig can end upside down in the ditch. There are a variety of devices that address this issue, and an equal number of opinions on which is best. There are many threads here that discuss the various brands and types.
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:45 PM   #28
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Just found this... Can anybody comment... I'm a super crew 4x4 perhaps the earlier photo I showed was not considering thisClick image for larger version

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Old 06-14-2014, 07:05 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by cmmorsey View Post
Just found this... Can anybody comment... I'm a super crew 4x4 perhaps the earlier photo I showed was not considering thisAttachment 214228
You're getting a lot of good info, I'm not sure where you got your screenshot, but I have been researching and looking at the ecoboost myself, 2012-2013 models, and I can assure you those are not the only two payloads, each one I have looked at on the lot is slightly different, things like leather seats and sunroof affect the payload, it's wonky and confusing for sure. Just look at your own door stickers to be 100%. Whatever they say, that's what you have.

I do know that the HD Payload is not available in the short bed. So if you have a short bed, chances are no HD Payload.
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Old 06-14-2014, 07:28 PM   #30
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new to Airstream and large towing... help?

I almost had a heart attack!!!

SORRY everybody who doesn't care about an "f150 forum" chat : /

This is what I found out for those who are interested.

2012 Ford F150 ecoboost
FX4 (4x4) SuperCrew
145" wheelbase
3.73 Axel
5.5' bed
Trailer Tow Package

*** 1,900lbs Payload Capacity***.

That's good news
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Old 06-14-2014, 07:30 PM   #31
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You have an L6 axle with 3.73 rear electronic locking. GOOD.

here is THE towing guide for your truck:

http://www.fleet.ford.com/resources/...VTTgdeMar1.pdf

Here is your marone sticker:

http://fordlabels.webview.biz/webvie...FW1ET2CFC99672

After looking at your marone (window sticker) and the side door sticker, you have everything you need to pull a 23' however, there is question with your wheel/tire package that you need to talk to Ford about. It appears that they put a special package on it. The wheels and tires need to carry a higher payload, ask them about this. A dealer may or may not be able to answer this but Ford can. They sound like street fancy looks but may be exactly what is bringing the payload capacity down. Hmm. Oh, and you still have to go with your sticker as it matches YOUR truck as fitted.

MikeKey is correct. HD payload is 1900 so be careful on the charts.
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Old 06-14-2014, 07:32 PM   #32
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Following this,

TV is a Ford F150 4x4 Supercab 163 inch. 6.5 foot bed. 3.73 rear end.

Front GAWR is 3,750, rear is 3,850.
GVWR is 7200, truck weight without trailer is 6,400.

However, I have Michelin 10 ply tires, 265/170/R17 LTX A/S, rated for 3,198 lbs, E rated tires, and I run them at 55psi. I could run them up to 80 psi. Steel valves btw.

I am looking at a Flying Cloud 25 FB, with a tongue weight of 467#s with no water or anything else. Max GCWR is 15,000#s. That does not appear to be an issue, and of course that is all the sales people pay attention to.

I am looking at the Blue Ox system because I understand I can back up with it in place.


Any comments would be appreciated...
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Old 06-14-2014, 07:55 PM   #33
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cmmorsey, according to your marone sticker, you have 20" passenger tires and may have wheels that are not designed for heavy loads- thus the lower payload figure. SO, in your case the tires/wheels may be the culprit. You have EVERYTHING on that truck for a powerful towing machine- power, tranny, tranny cooling kit, brake controller, etc. As mentioned, talk to Ford (reiteration, I know)



@Photbum, which engine and what year of F150?
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Old 06-14-2014, 08:05 PM   #34
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Pretty sure the tongue weight on a 25FB is much higher than 467. The 23FB is about that much though.
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Old 06-14-2014, 08:09 PM   #35
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I am looking at the Blue Ox system because I understand I can back up with it in place.
Isn't blue OX for motorhomes? Perhaps I am not familiar with it but from your comment about leaving it connected, most trailers stay completely connected during the backing process.

@mrpres: tongue weights: The 23D is 700 lbs. The 25FB is 837lbs +LP, etc.
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Old 06-14-2014, 08:25 PM   #36
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I was referring to the 23fb. The 23D is not a very functional floorplan.
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Old 06-14-2014, 09:28 PM   #37
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My mistake, 25 FC FB is 837#s. Including propane, but not water.

So i would in theory be over 7200#s. Do the tires make a difference? And a Blue Ox hitch?
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:48 PM   #38
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I don't understand? Seems like a light trailer for a truck that has 14,000lb towing capacity... WD and sway control should take care of towing if I've been listening ok...
On a "half ton" (F150) You will usually run out of payload before you can get anywhere near the truck's "Max Tow Rating".

Max Tow Ratings must be calculated using an empty truck with a tiny mutant driver.

Your allowable payload number includes the ACTUAL tongue weight of the trailer when ready to tow / camp. That would be propane / water / foodstuffs / clothes / etc...........Don't forget the extra weight of a W/D hitch assembly. Now pack the truck for camping.

Then go to the CAT scales............(see numerous threads on "how to")

The payload sticker on your doorjamb is for YOUR truck as equipped.
Nothing can "legally" change that..............The charts shown in Ford's brochures state "Maximum" payloads and tow ratings for various configurations - not the values for YOUR truck as equipped.

Tires, shocks, "helper" springs....none increase the payload.
Numerous "Garage Engineers" will tell you otherwise.

There are numerous "1/2 ton" pickups towing trailers that are way over rated payload - most say "No problem" - I say - "Test Pilot".

Yours a Lariat model maybe? All the options eat up payload.

FYI - The payload sticker on my lightly optioned 2013 F150 XLT SuperCrew EcoBoost 3.55 locker is 1,642 #

And yes, a F250 / C2500 (3/4 ton) will be my next truck.
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Old 06-14-2014, 11:02 PM   #39
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Old 06-15-2014, 12:46 AM   #40
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No need for confusion. Purchase a Reese dual cam sway control weight control hitch rated at 1000 lbs tongue weight. Have it installed by an expert.

The issue is how often one actually requires this set. Well it really is about being prepared for the times you do need it such as very windy days, unusual weight issues, and to allow the the trailer to sit level when traveling down the road. Without a weight distribution hitch your truck may be low in the back, headlights in the air, and poor steering response.

Good luck,
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