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Old 05-30-2012, 08:38 PM   #1
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GMC Autoride and weight distribution

Is there a sequence to hitching up my A/S to my Yukon (with Autoride) that will avoid the LOSS of weight on the front axle? I seem to remember some discussion on this 8 years ago when I was researching tow vehicles. I would like to see my steering axle bear more of the trailer weight.

Thanks.
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Old 05-30-2012, 08:46 PM   #2
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My opinion is this.
With Yukon empty:
1) pull the ELC underhood fuse
2) load the vehicle and hitch up the AS, fully loaded
3) adjust the Hensley so you have a level truck and AS.
4) take rig to CAT scales and record each axle weight
5) report results here....then we can advise.
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Old 05-30-2012, 09:40 PM   #3
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There is autoride and there is autoride. On the 2500 Yukon XL the autoride adjusts the damping of the shocks, only, and doesn't adjust suspension height. If that's what you have, you can dial in the WD the usual way.
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Old 05-30-2012, 09:52 PM   #4
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Yukon has Electronic level control in the rear (height sensor). Also has dynamic ride control, but that is not a ride height control, just dampening. The ELC is the issue with WD adjustment.
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Old 05-31-2012, 03:54 PM   #5
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I would add a #6 to DZ's list.

Replace the ELC fuse, let the ride height stabilize, and re-weigh.
This would tell you what, if any, difference there is.

Bob
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:35 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBERT CROSS View Post
I would add a #6 to DZ's list.

Replace the ELC fuse, let the ride height stabilize, and re-weigh.
This would tell you what, if any, difference there is.

Bob

Depending on the exact vehicle I have used in the past, I'd agree. Some settled only about 1/2" - 1" after proper WD was applied. With these vehicles, replacing the fuse didn't re-activate any height adjustment, as there is some travel in a "dead spot" which keeps the system from cycling too much.

Others would settle to the point where the ELC would come on and raise the rear at least an inch after proper WD was applied. This operation removed the effect of some of the WD and would load the rear axle too much. (disguised by the ride control.)

Bottom line....with some trucks and suspension options, I have left the fuse out for the duration of the tow and others I have reinstalled it for the tow.

Hope that makes sense.
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Old 06-01-2012, 08:56 PM   #7
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Are you referring to the "automatic level control?" I'm assuming this is what you are calling "elc.". I have all weights as hitched up as I've always done it...my concern is that the steering axle on the Yukon went from 3,500 without trailer to 3,130 with. The manual indicates that you should keep the key in the run position to allow the height to adjust before operating weight distribution. I've never done this because the weight distribution is easier to tighten with the weight still on the jack.

I don't mind spending more $ to weigh the rig again, but before I do, I want to get the steps right, including making adjustments to the Hensley, if required.

Thanks.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:11 PM   #8
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ELC = Electronic Level Control...same thing as auto level control...but I think you will find the fuse labeled ELC.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:41 PM   #9
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Jammer is on the right track. I have a 2000 K2500 with Autoride. Autoride is a dynamic suspension system trade marked/patented system by GM and has been offered on both cars and light trucks. The body control module controls suspension damping (shock absorber valving) according to speed, steering angle, body roll and suspension deflection data. Additionally, there are two modes programmed for any vehicle with Autoride, normal with lighter damping and sport (car)/tow (light truck) with stiffer damping. The tow mode on the gear selector lever automatically invokes the tow damping on the trucks. Autoride in and of itself does not alter the setup of a weight distributing hitch in any way.

Now, for the other option animal, auto level (an option/standard feature on the 1500 series vehicles only) and on some cars, too. The auto level is a ride-height control system that employs pneumatic helper air bags that are integrated with the rear shock absorbers. In order to set up a weight distributing hitch initially, the auto level system should be disabled temporarily as described by dznfOg. Once the fuse is pulled, you would set up the WD hitch in a normal manner and and then re-install the fuse and allow the auto level to work its magic for minor changes in tow vehicle loading. Auto Level does use the rear ride height sensors used by the Autoride system (but in a different manner). As I recall, Autoride and auto level are both controlled by the body control module (computer). But, they are separate systems.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:47 PM   #10
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Autoride is definitely controlled by the BCM, but I believe auto level control is a stand alone, relatively dumb, height sensor, compressor, 12 volt system. I don't believe it interacts with the BCM or any other electronics on the vehicle.
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Old 06-02-2012, 07:13 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwoodrver View Post
Are you referring to the "automatic level control?" I'm assuming this is what you are calling "elc.". I have all weights as hitched up as I've always done it...my concern is that the steering axle on the Yukon went from 3,500 without trailer to 3,130 with. The manual indicates that you should keep the key in the run position to allow the height to adjust before operating weight distribution. I've never done this because the weight distribution is easier to tighten with the weight still on the jack.

I don't mind spending more $ to weigh the rig again, but before I do, I want to get the steps right, including making adjustments to the Hensley, if required.

Thanks.
I think a trip to the CAT's will answer your question's. I would get several weights at different jack bar settings with the ELC/ALC disabled. I did three, no tension, mid tension and full tension. Once you have the proper weight transferred, replace the fuse/relay and weigh again to confirm what if any effect the self leveling has on WD.

POI...I've done as many as six weights at one time while setting up the haha.
Think it was $8 for the first and $1 for each additional. Just try and pick a not so busy time. Do it loaded for camping if possible.

Here is a sample of my tickets....all but 100lbs returned to the str axle.
TV alone
No bars
Bars set

Bob
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Old 06-02-2012, 09:10 PM   #12
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Bob,

Thanks for sharing scale tags, and that's all for input. I'll look for a scale in a small town next week(we are on the road) and will get some more data. The main thing I see now is when I lift the spring bars it does add weight to the steering axle, but also adds it to the trailer,something I can't afford, as I am 600# over on front trailer axle already. It will be interesting to see how much of that I lose with no spring bars, but of course, my front end will get lighter.

Maybe weight distribution of 39% front 61% rear is tolerable, and I can focus on throwing out everything I can in the front of the A/S to shed some of the 600 lbs. But the four AGMs are staying! I gotta say, I love the solid handling; never had a scare in tens of thousands of miles.

Thank again for the input.
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Old 06-03-2012, 05:43 AM   #13
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wildwoodrver,

A couple things to consider, notice on my third ticket that the trailer axle weight is 7640lbs with the trailer level and the bars set. I have two axles rated at 3500lbs each, trlr GVWR, 7300lbs. Careful loading is even more important with under-rated axles. Something the Factory has corrected on most of the newer models.

More weight on the front axle of the trailer would indicate that you may be a little nose low. We had to refine our trailer loading quite a bit before we got the routine down.

I have room for more tension on our bars and have experimented with adding that 100lbs to the steering axle, it had little/no effect as far as stability is concerned. I DO know that removing an inch or so on the haha jacks has a pronounced effect on how the rig handles. Our TV's have the same WB and trailers are the same length with the same hitch so i would expect the same results for you. I've found that small adjustments and careful seat-of-the-pants comparisons best when fine tuning.

Remember a level TV and trailer is very important when setting-up.

Bob
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