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Old 09-03-2012, 12:39 PM   #15
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An illustration of why everything is not cut and dry:
For a while I towed a 15 foot Casita behind my 3/4 ton pick up.
That sounds like a no brainier. Very light and aerodynamic TT behind heavy TV. However, the track of the Casita was so narrow that it would alternately fall into one or the other of the semi ruts. It would then get swaying pretty badly bouncing back and forth from one rut to the other. I never felt I was in any danger of loosing control, but I could sure feel it back there. I believe that if I did not move over partially onto the shoulder so I could straddle one of the ruts, the swaying could have gotten violent enough to cause the trailer to come off the hitch.

Ken
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Old 09-03-2012, 01:07 PM   #16
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So without water your tongue weight is probably under 400lbs. That's two guys sitting on the tail gate. You do not need weight distribution at all to pull this trailer with that truck.

Antisway would be a nice thing to have. I would recommend that. But as Andy said, you are basically pulling a tiny trailer with a Kenworth. I doubt the truck even knows the trailer is back there...so to speak.

A 3500 like that is probably rated to haul 3000lbs in the bed. So if you have even 600lbs of tongue load (that might be approaching the line where you'd want to consider WD with this truck...maybe) and put 1500lbs in the back, you're still way under the truck's capacity.

Don't confuse weight distribution and antisway. I use both, but my tongue weight is closer to 1100lbs and I'm using a 2500HD with single rear wheels. I also pulled it 700 miles home on just the ball and it didn't sag the rear much...with a dually I wouldn't worry about WD. Antisway is always good.

See ya on the road,
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Old 09-03-2012, 01:15 PM   #17
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Id go ahead and buy the sway control bar, then if you feel you need the WD hitch later, buy it seperate! Easy stuff lol
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Old 09-03-2012, 01:37 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
I would think a swaying 3600# trailer would be a handful for this truck. Why take the chance. Put a weight distribution hitch with sway control on it.

Andersen makes a new weight distribution hitch that will give you sway control even without the weight distribution chains hooked up, easy to use and inexpensive.

doug k
I believe the chains do have to be hooked up to give sway control but they don't have to be tight enough to distribute weight.
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Old 09-03-2012, 01:46 PM   #19
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Not a 3500 expert but.....

generally speaking trucks with no loads are front heavy. A little weight on the back tends to bring them a little more in line with a 50/50 front/back ratio which generally speaking it the benchmark for balance/performance.

It seems sway control/prevention is what is required.

But if the truck bed was getting loaded up then the idea of WD seems to come into play.
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Old 09-03-2012, 02:13 PM   #20
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I believe the chains do have to be hooked up to give sway control but they don't have to be tight enough to distribute weight.
Hi, yes; Correct me if I'm wrong, but the chains hold the tri-angle bracket that is pinned to the bottom of the ball, which makes the ball rotate with the trailer, and not in the coupler.
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Old 09-03-2012, 03:45 PM   #21
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I have a one ton dually with crewcab and full size box like the poster. I have a 26 foot Overlander with slightly more weight that his trailer. I do not use W/D hitch when I drag the Overlander. I have been doing it for 10 years. No problem ever. Even my wife drives it.

When I drag my 31 ft 1977 Soveregn, I use a Reese twin cam hitch, it is nice and stable and I do not need the frictional damper. Many miles driven with it, no problem. It was a little unstable when I used my previous 3/4 ton van. Wife did not like fighting it in traffic. I put the frictional dampener on then.

When I drag the 34 foot 1989 I find it a little unsteady with the Reese without the frictional dampener. Adding the dampener fixes it. Even the wife drives without a problem.

Putting more air in the bags to raise the truck will increase the rear suspension stiffness and do more damage to the trailer. Do not do it. Being a little off level is not a problem. Your big diesel engine puts plenty of weight over the front wheels. You do not need to transfer any more weight.

All W/D systems put more force on the trailer when you encounter a bump or hole in the road. Use minimal rate spring bars to minimize the damage. Drop the air pressure in the tires if you are not carrying a full load to make the ride softer. Check the tire temperatures to see that they are not overheating or having too much heat build up in the sidewalls.e
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Old 09-03-2012, 04:53 PM   #22
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Still mixed messages on w.d or not for the o.p.

The Law I would apply here is Murphy's; if can happen it will, and always at the least convenient moment (or a variation thereof).

doug k
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Old 09-03-2012, 05:08 PM   #23
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To the OP: why would you think this optional?

Try the owners manual. 350-lbs or 500-lbs for a 1T dually depending on the year and brand. Factory requirement, not a "suggestion" (anti-sway is strongly suggested also).

So without water your tongue weight is probably under 400lbs. That's two guys sitting on the tail gate. You do not need weight distribution at all to pull this trailer with that truck.


JG, TW is a static measurement. And only when at rest. The lever arm -- ball to trailer axle is the lever acting upon the TV. Do those two old fat boys change "weight" from 250-lbs each to 3,600-lbs each within seconds . . that TW can sure show that range measured under dynamic conditions. How long the lever arm is (for some) the determinant. It isn't, it is the static tongue weight minimum (as above). TV payload has little to do with whether or not a vehicle needs WD; it is not, strictly speaking, a payload question.

A WDH is meant to spread the TW forces (so to speak). The vehicle towing the trailer is what needs WDH not the trailer. An A/S can out-handle and out-brake any pickup on the market (behind the better TV's). Bring the combination up to an optimal point is the reason for WD & anti-sway.

This ought to be a no-brainer. Testosterone and over-estimation of ability cloud this issue every time the question comes up. That I can tow my 32' with a Dodge diesel w/o WD or anti-sway is not the point, it is that the addition and proper rigging with these devices gives the driver a little more time and a little more distance to make things right.

I can flick the tail of this 32' into another lane without even trying (w/o a decent hitch). The use of a VPP hitch means I'd have to work at it persistently to achieve that same end. Sway elimination versus sway resistance delineate the best from the second best (Hensley, Pull-Rite & Pro-Pride vs. Dual Cam, Andersen or Equalizer, etc). Make your choices there.

Correcting for a particular TW is the first step in correct towing.

Most of all, it is not expensive, difficult or even tedious to get it right.

The "mixed message" is only for those who want to see one.

.

.
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Old 09-03-2012, 05:19 PM   #24
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I think having WD on that big of a tow vehicle would be absolutely silly.
WD is for vehicles that do not have the tongue weight capacity so some of the weight is distributed onto the front wheels.
Your Dualy could probably carry the ENTIRE WEIGHT of your trailer on the ball with no ill effects.
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Old 09-03-2012, 05:33 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultradog View Post
I
...............................
WD is for vehicles that do not have the tongue weight capacity so some of the weight is distributed onto the front wheels.
....................................
.
That statement is pretty much totally wrong. Weight distribution's purpose is to return at least some of the weight that was removed from the front axle by the placing of weight behind the rear axle. This is done to restore the steering characteristics of the vehicle to as close to normal as possible. Placing weight on a trailer hitch is not at all the same as placing weight in the bed of a truck.

Furthermore, placing more tongue weight on the truck hitch than it is rated for with the expectation that the weight distribution will return it to a safe range is just plain foolish.

Ken
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Old 09-03-2012, 05:39 PM   #26
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WOW looks like the resident xperts are ahead so far. I am withholding my opinion until the the other side fires a volley, jim
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Old 09-03-2012, 05:44 PM   #27
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WOW looks like the resident xperts are ahead so far. I am withholding my opinion until the the other side fires a volley, jim
Well, I'm hanging my hat on my rather wishy washy post #14.


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Old 09-03-2012, 05:52 PM   #28
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Our 2006 F-350 DRW PSTD owner manual says 800 pounds weight carrying, 1500 pounds weight distributing.
My opinion is that these 3/4 ton and 1 ton class trucks with diesel engines tend to be pretty front heavy anyway. If I remember correct, in a Ford, having a powerstroke means it is almost 600 pounds heavier in the front than if you have a gas engine. At least in my mind, that 'front heavyness' ( is that a word ? ) helps to offset the need for weight distributing hitches when dealing with moderate tongue weight trailers.
An anti sway device is a good idea in my opinion.
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