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Old 07-09-2012, 07:37 PM   #1
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F-250 Gas or Diesel????

I am in the process of selling my 7mpg MH and planning on a 25-30' AS. The 30' Classic is what I really like.
For a TV I am looking at a F250 and would appreciate some info on the 6.2L gas as opposed to the diesel. I think there are a lot of additional costs associated with the diesel.

We live in NH with plenty of hills and plan on seeing the country in retirement.
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Old 07-09-2012, 07:59 PM   #2
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ntrocks

Diesel rocks.

Will never go back -- especially for a cross country trip.

If the price is the same, expect 30% better mileage, on average, based on the amount of energy present in each gallon of fuel. (Google BTUs per gallon for more detail).

See Consumer Reports for individual vehicles.

John
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:41 PM   #3
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Maybe you got some reason other than mpg to make the change? Sure, you might get a little better mpg pulling the trailer than driving the MH. But then when you unhook you are driving a low mpg truck rather than a fuel efficient towed. I bet overall the motorhomers make out with less fuel than us trailer people. I know we like to unhook and go see the area so we run many more miles unhooked than actually towing on most of our trips.
I know people who have gone both ways on the 250 gas vs diesel question. They both think they did it right well after the purchase. It is not cheap either way. I love pulling with my diesel.
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:43 PM   #4
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I have a 2001 Ford F250 Diesel, 7.3. It's great. I also hear good things about the 6.0. The 7.3 pulls our 31' Sovereign like it's not there. The mileage is around 15mpg, towing or not. Diesel fuel is a bit higher and it holds 14 quarts of oil, so it costs a bit more to change the oil. In terms of maintenance it seems about like other pickups I have owned. If I was to get a new one I'd get a diesel (if I could afford it). But this one seems to be doing just fine for now.
cheers, bill b.
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:19 PM   #5
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30 classic, diesel. I tow a 31 classic. first with gas then diesel. I still have the diesel.
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:32 PM   #6
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If you are going 3/4 ton... you might as well go diesel...
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:37 PM   #7
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I can't speak to the 6.2l gas, but I owned a 2003 F250 5.4l gas, and sold it a couple of years ago to buy a 6.4l diesel.

When in tow/haul mode, the gas engine ran 3500 rpm and averaged 9-10 mpg towing our 26' boat on a double axle trailer. The mileage was terrible, and I felt like the engine was screaming all the time.

We still own the same boat (and now a 30' Flying Cloud). When towing either trailer with the new F250 diesel, we routinely run 1750 to 1800 rpm and our mileage is still in the 9 to 10 range. Diesel fuel is usually at a premium by $.30 per gallon, and just to buy the diesel engine increases the price of the truck by about $4500. You will be hard-pressed to come out ahead over time due tonfuel cost by buying the diesel truck unless you put many many miles on it. However you will also come out ahead when you sell the truck by having higher resale value than a gas truck.

Keep in mind that my vehicle is a 2010. The new 2011 models have a more fuel efficient 6.7 L scorpion engine. Many of the problems with the 2010 fuel efficiency are a result of emissions control equipment. I am sorely disappointed with the mileage I get on my diesel, especially when gas is $.30 cheaper per gallon. However, having said that, I truly believe that the diesel engine is a much better engine all around.

I love that my truck has so much power and low end torque that towing a 9000# trailer puts no strain on the vehicle. I'm sure I'd buy another diesel, but not for imroved mileage. Some of the new gassers (like the Ford Ecoboost) are amazing engines with great torque and horsepower.

Try borrowing both to give it a test run!
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:37 PM   #8
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All of you need to get a diesel fitter.
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AIR-Quarius
All of you need to get a diesel fitter.
Let me guess, Air-Quarius.... Certainly you should know someone that should destribute such a fine product.

Do tell
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:56 PM   #10
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Yes, A diesel fitter is the sales person that goes into the back of the clothing store and returns back to the customer saying...DIESEL FITTER!
lol
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Old 07-09-2012, 10:11 PM   #11
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My vote is diesel. I have a 2011 F-250 with the 6.7 and I love it!!! Lots of power and if you keep your foot out of it 19-20 mpg is not unreasonable highway mileage when unloaded. I got 19.5 from here in OK to New Orleans. And although it takes more oil, the oil changes should be less frequent.
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Old 07-09-2012, 10:13 PM   #12
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I've had 3 Ford diesels: 7.3, 6.0 and now the 6.4, and have enjoyed them all. There are a lot of good opinions out there on gas/diesel, but one of the benefits that I enjoy from having a diesel is I have installed a 50 gallon auxiliary fuel tank, providing me with a total of 80 gallon capacity.

Now it is no joy when you are filling up from empty, but it substantially reduces our fuel stops, and allows us a little more economic benefit because we can load up when the price of fuel is lowest. It has been really helpful traveling out west where distances between fuel stops can increase. It does take up some real estate in the truck bed, but is low enough to fit under our tonneau cover.

All in all, I'm not seeing a gas truck anytime in my future. I will cross 100,000 miles in my 2008 F250 in the next 2 weeks and have had VERY few issues to date; hope to keep it running for years to come.
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Old 07-09-2012, 10:20 PM   #13
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They long debated gas vs diesel !
My opinion, is if the cost does not bother you, and/or if you really need 600 or more ft-lbs of torque, then diesel.

But if you can get by with the lesser torque of a gas engine for the job at hand, then it probably holds something of a cost advantage, at least until you get out to 200,000 miles or so for that vehicle. We have a (small) variety of both ( and even have a hybrid in the mix now ), and I see the pros and cons of both gas and diesel.

In my opinion, the jury is still out on the new 6.7 PSTD....it's still too new to see a good mix of them out there with a lot miles. We shall see.
Our 2006 6.0 has been one of them that's been a bit of a problem child. Still when it runs, it pulls well, and when we drop the over 12K pound horse trailer on the back of it, it moves nicely.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:16 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nhrocks View Post
I am in the process of selling my 7mpg MH and planning on a 25-30' AS. The 30' Classic is what I really like.
For a TV I am looking at a F250 and would appreciate some info on the 6.2L gas as opposed to the diesel. I think there are a lot of additional costs associated with the diesel.

We live in NH with plenty of hills and plan on seeing the country in retirement.
I'd skip the 3/4T and just go 1T . . there is no substantial difference in the solo ride, but the extra payload capacity (for gear and a heavy tongue weight) will make you happier, IMO.

As to gas versus diesel: The newest turbocharged diesels have highly complex (and problematic) emissions systems. Fuel economy is back up over post 2006 versions with the use of DEF (diesel exhaust fluid: the engine can now be tuned for better mpg) which pays for itself (a non-starter for avoidance as it can be found everywhere today).

But, without reference to vehicle brand, the HP/TQ numbers on these now highly expensive trucks are overkill for any Airstream ever made. More is not better. The gasoline engines are far better than ever before and have pretty well the same expected service life (they got better, and diesels are likely not much better than 250k B50 life any more) as the introduction of direct injection gasoline engines is a game-changer.

That, coupled with 7 and 8 speed automatics on the near horizon makes gasoline pickup trucks more desirable than they've been in over twenty years (the mid-90's turbocharged Cummins in the Dodge was the opposite swing of the pendulum).

One can rest assured that whatever the truck engine redline (top rpm) that it will run at that speed all day, everyday and not falter. Vapor lock, altitude changes and other past demons of hot, hard-running engines are pretty well a thing of the past. And transmission controls to give "engine braking" while on a descent are described as being more than satisfactory.

Read around and plan well. But, the better approach would be in securing a Pro-Pride hitch, DIRECLINK brake controller and the budget for trailer disc brakes. The Gold Standard. An Airstream can outhandle/outbrake any pickup truck, thus it is the truck that most needs help in stability and steering control is an off-aspect way of looking at this.

Brute force isn't the necessary approach. The tow vehicle needing the least amount of power to pull this trailer (of a design which minimizes fuel burn) and is set up with the best hitch & brakes is the better combination. And a pickup truck is not the default choice except as folks tend to carry too much junk with them . . my grandparents and parents used full-sze and luxury American cars of the 1960's and '70's to cover most of North America as well as Mexico . . . what were they losing out on by not carrying an extra kitchen sink? (is the thinking). IOW, move more to a clean sheet of paper. What "most RV'ers" do is done without planning or thinking things through too well.

Have a look at the posts & threads of contributor Andrew T of Can Am RV to see what can be done (and what was once done) by those wanting to travel a bit lighter with a better-handling, better-braking TV than a pickup truck.

Not suggesting you change your plans, but I am suggesting that this is to help better shape the diesel versus gasoline debate when towing an Airstream as convention is not what it seems when one digs a bit more deeply (and plans/packs more carefully).

The recent threads on this forum by phbarnhart are worth your while to see how a rig can come together: best hitch and setting it up on a certified scale, trailer disc brakes (with state of the art controller and near-future trailer ABS; on his list, I think), as well as the very best trailer wheel size and tires of proper load rating is more to the point than any "check the engine box" discussion around here.

The weight given to the tow vehicle decisions is unduly heavy compared to where it belongs once one has chosen an aerodynamic, lightweight, all-aluminum, low center-of-gravity, low ground clearance travel trailer with fully independent suspension. That was the important decision.

As tow vehicles come and go (and a minivan can tow an A/S of any size, weight is not the primary consideration) since the TT is the permanent acquistion. Thus the TV is not nearly so critical as it may change more often. And a wider range of vehicles are suitable. Choose the particular A/S trailer and outfit it with top hitch, brakes and controller. And then choose from a wider variety of TV's as you will.

Besides, this thread topic has already been done to death over the past few years. Conduct some searches and bring your questions back to this thread (with links as necessary) and contributors can point you in directions dependent on what you've encountered.

Welcome to AIR, nhrocks.

.
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