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Old 08-04-2013, 06:35 PM   #15
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When I learned the Hensley/Propride hitch design eliminated trailer sway (tail wagging dog) it became clear these sway conversations are not relevant in this age of towing. If this concerns you, you don't need a bigger truck to mask trailer sway, you need a modern hitch to eliminate it.

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Old 08-04-2013, 07:05 PM   #16
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Glad you weren't hurt! Hope the other guys were ok too. I've seen others in that condition and it is just frightening!

It does seem the AS is better out of the gates on this aspect (the video Phoenix posted demonstrates that well). Still, I'll take as much help as I can get with my choice of hitch and slower speed. You can't control everything but you can raise your odds a bit...
Not sure about the other guy. He said he was OK even though he was upside down in a ditch that had water in it. We have sway control and a decent TV.
I was kind of shaking and then, after it seemed everything was OK except the other guy's truck and trailer, I hoped the parrot in our back seat didn't learn any bad words.
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Old 08-04-2013, 07:37 PM   #17
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I even noticed it this weekend while towing a 5,000 lb. sailboat on the interstate.
Next time furl the sail before you tow
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Old 08-04-2013, 07:59 PM   #18
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I hoped the parrot in our back seat didn't learn any bad words.
How many times did you say "oh sh*t"? :-)

Don't mean to minimize the situation - it's scary, but thinking about your recollection of the moments before, don't be surprised if that's the parrot's next phrase! :-o
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:08 PM   #19
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How many times did you say "oh sh*t"? :-)

Don't mean to minimize the situation - it's scary, but thinking about your recollection of the moments before, don't be surprised if that's the parrot's next phrase! :-o
I said it more times than I care to think. The words Dusty learns are usually the ones we would prefer not to have her learn. We normally do not swear.
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:23 PM   #20
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Lets just say I'm glad bloodhounds can't repeat what they hear!

Click image for larger version

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I think this was the 5th time she jumped up on that picnic table at a campground and got her hound ears full of a creative tapestry of language that would have make George Carlin blush. It's not her fault either, at our local off leash park, the picnic tables are expressly for the dogs and not for people. How would she know any different?

On edit - for the mods, let the record reflect there is a tail and a dog in this reply. :-)
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Old 08-04-2013, 09:01 PM   #21
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Back when I was younger than I am now, I had the tail wag the dog. I was moving and was pulling a U haul trailer from Tulsa OK to Wichita Falls Tx and had loaded the trailer wrong. As Andy said it's all about proper set up and loading, I was young and inexperienced and loaded some of the heaviest items at the back of the trailer, and didn't have the proper loading of 12-15% on the tongue. This combined with too much speed, I all but ended up in a ditch upside down and possible dead. An 18 wheeler behind me saw what was happening and moved over in the middle of the road to keep anyone from passing him, and by just pure luck or someone above looking out for me, I got the thing under control with no damage. My poor dog was in the back of my blazer being slammed from side to side in the most violent way imageable, when the trailer wags the truck, I can attest that it is very violent and no fun.

Skip forward 25 years and a 34' Airstream classic and a 2011 Chevy 3/4 ton HD Duramax Diesel with sway control from the factory and a Pro pride hitch, I can say you will not even notice when an 18 wheeler passes you. Its a none event, so much so that my wife who would never drive before I had this hitch, drove this summer on a 4 thousand mile trip, about half the time. So again I will echo what Andy said, get the proper truck, proper hitch, and lastly but not least, have it set up properly, and you will fell and be much safer.
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Old 08-05-2013, 08:52 AM   #22
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I think the truck does all that wiggling around without a trailer because it is big, heavy, wide, long, and top heavy.
Another contributing factor is the rough, lumpy, bumpy roads. The gubment is broke. The road bed is all broken down and worn out under the asphalt. Asphalt is basically liquid and never stops "flowing" under the weight of constant 18 wheeler traffic.
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:42 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
When I learned the Hensley/Propride hitch design eliminated trailer sway (tail wagging dog) it became clear these sway conversations are not relevant in this age of towing. If this concerns you, you don't need a bigger truck to mask trailer sway, you need a modern hitch to eliminate it.

doug
Not sure I'd agree that sway conversations aren't relevant, but we've towed over 20,000 km with our ProPride 3P and I can affirm that it eliminates sway completely.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:41 AM   #24
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Not sure I'd agree that sway conversations aren't relevant, but we've towed over 20,000 km with our ProPride 3P and I can affirm that it eliminates sway completely.
Perhaps that's the point I attempted, with the Hensley/ProPride design trailer sway concerns are no longer an issue.

I will say we never felt sway with two other hitch designs either, but I knew it was entirely possible and disastrous. I've seen the results. We also felt the steering inputs of passing trucks during strong crosswinds, gusting sidewinds, uneven roads, and steady strong crosswind. It was there because the trailer was moved to a slight angle behind the truck. That's not possible with the 3p style hitch.

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Old 08-05-2013, 11:46 AM   #25
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I do not believe you will ever completely eliminate tail wag..just minimize it. If 18 wheelers can't stop it neither can we! However, a good load equalizing hitch helps tremendously. I do not know why someone would pay $40,000 to $120000 for a trailer and $40,000 to $60,000 for a vehicle and put it at tremendous risk by not taking the logical steps to insure a safe ride. When I purchased my airstream the first thing I checked was GVWR required for it. With those matched, electric breaks, load equalizing hitch, an sway bars came next. With those installed I took a 7000 mile trip through the rockies to SF, LA, and back home. This was the third such trip. The first a pop up, the second a echo trailer, and then the queen. The Airstream handled better that the two smaller trailers and gave me better Gas mileage. It is more like driving a 45ft vehicle than a trailer. The real test will be in snow and ice (soon coming)
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Old 08-05-2013, 11:59 AM   #26
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I do not believe you will ever completely eliminate tail wag..just minimize it. If 18 wheelers can't stop it neither can we! However, a good load equalizing hitch helps tremendously. I do not know why someone would pay $40,000 to $120000 for a trailer and $40,000 to $60,000 for a vehicle and put it at tremendous risk by not taking the logical steps to insure a safe ride. When I purchased my airstream the first thing I checked was GVWR required for it. With those matched, electric breaks, load equalizing hitch, an sway bars came next. With those installed I took a 7000 mile trip through the rockies to SF, LA, and back home. This was the third such trip. The first a pop up, the second a echo trailer, and then the queen. The Airstream handled better that the two smaller trailers and gave me better Gas mileage. It is more like driving a 45ft vehicle than a trailer. The real test will be in snow and ice (soon coming)
Tail wag is completely eliminated by the Hensley/ProPride linkage design. Conventional sway control hitches don't have it, nor do 18 wheelers. The trailer is locked from turning the tow vehicle, but the tow vehicle can easily turn the trailer.

Snow and ice add another problem to conventional friction sway control hitches. When the trailer moves out of alignment with the tow vehicle, the friction resists it from returning to straight alignment. This can be a serious control problem. Some people loosen the friction bar on the hitch to help, but there goes sway control. The Hensley/ProPride does not resist returning to straight line when the tow vehicle steers out of tow vehicle/trailer alignment.

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Old 08-05-2013, 01:07 PM   #27
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Tail wag is completely eliminated by the Hensley/ProPride linkage design. Conventional sway control hitches don't have it, nor do 18 wheelers. The trailer is locked from turning the tow vehicle, but the tow vehicle can easily turn the trailer.
Precisely. I have tried to induce sway in the trailer by wagging the nose of the dog but the tail just follows obediently behind.

We habitually tow at 90 km/h (56 mph) and when on major highways we're constantly passed by large trucks and buses, sometimes at high speed. The effect is the same as if not towing - the entire rig gets pushed outwards by the bow wave of the passing vehicle. Crosswinds are similar; The entire rig is affected. No sway. Not even a little. Ever.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:42 AM   #28
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There are still more Reese and other older hitches on the road that the combination of Arrows and Proprides, so this thread is relevant. To be scientifically correct, PP and Arrow minimize tail wagging, but do not eliminate it. Their 4 bar linkage simulates, or transposes, the pivot point to about the center line of the rear wheels of the TV. This is similar to what a Pullrite, 5th wheel, or a semitrailer truck does. The bow waive effect, from the passing trailer truck, is still there, but its effect on the steering effort need by you is minimized by the shift of the pivot point. The old International IH's, with the blunt nose cab-over design, were the worst.
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