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Old 04-30-2016, 07:16 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by Ultradog View Post
Diesels stink.

The fuel stinks and the exhaust stinks.

And they're Noisy.

A gasser is far more pleasant to run. And to get all the longevity out of a diesel to make the original purchase price work out you have to run them like for 15 years. But who wants to drive a pickup that old?


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YMMV
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Old 05-01-2016, 01:16 AM   #44
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Because of reasons that could start another political boil, I will just say that in my observations perhaps the majority of small cars here in the UK have three and four cylinder small diesel engines and many get over 50 mpg. The Mercedes Smart car has a three cylinder diesel here the USA will never see and my father-in-law gets close to 60 mpg in city driving. The USA gas engine gets in the mid to high 20s per the door labels with a three cylinder gasoline engine.

These small diesels are simpler and much less expensive to operate in terms of long terms operation than the Hybrid battery cars we see in USA, but there are big bucks to be made on the replacement batteries that costs many thousands and are an environmental disaster if improperly disposed of when being replaced.
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Old 05-01-2016, 08:07 AM   #45
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Smart fuel mileage

Well, as the owner of two previous Smart Fortwo coupes, I can attest to about 37 to 40 mpg in city driving, maybe 40 - 42 on the highway. But, premium fuel.

As to the choice between gas and diesel,my perspective is from one who may pull 700 miles in one day.

My Dodge/Cummins gets about 12- 14 mpg pulling, but the big advantage is I have a total of 95 gallons on board... not possible with gasoline as the dangers of an auxiliary fuel cell are extremely difficult to reduce.

So, I can pull all day without fueling, my rest time being more important than the struggle with the fuel hose.

However, it is much easier to refuel with gasoline, this being true because one is within the "system" not required to open the bed tonneau, struggle with a huge hose, etc.

I am curious what folks with a hemi get for mpg, towing at 60 - 65 mph....
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Old 05-02-2016, 05:10 AM   #46
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We replaced the stock fuel tank under cab/bed with the Titan 54 gallon tank so there is only one fill point on the vehicle. I can not sit for the time to drive 600 miles without one or two personal off loading operations. However, the range is great for being able to find a non bio-diesel refueling source.
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Old 05-02-2016, 09:22 AM   #47
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Actually the Ford gasser 6.2 is a very proven engine and has less overall problems than any other gas engine. By saving $8-9,000 you can buy a lot of gas not to mention the maintenance costs and chance of bad fuel. Most of the fleet vehicles sold are the Ford HD 6.2 gas engine and with the new aluminum bodies means less weight and more towing.
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Old 05-02-2016, 10:26 AM   #48
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I have a 2016 power Wagon. The big Hemi has done everything that I have asked of it. Why did I choose it? For one I still like going on the path least taken. This truck, in stock form, really has no competition in that arena. Having the lifetime warranty was a very big plus! It is not offered for the 6.7 CTD. That made the decision easier when you see new diesel trucks on the shoulder with the hoods up. My pockets aren't that deep. I do a lot of city driving with short trips. Also live in a cold climate. Newer diesels don't have the cold start issues like in the past, but the fuel still does. Another added expense. Getting rid of the emissions equipment on the engine is not an option for me. My county still does emission tests on diesel trucks. So, the motor would never run as good as it could. Now I live in the Rockies. I can see how the CTD would hold a higher gear versus the Hemi. The extra torque is huge. Towing a 27' FC the PW regularly sees mid to high 11's. One trip saw 12 while the anamoly was 12.7 mpg. Haven't figured out what I could have done differently to get the last number. It was a pleasant surprise. Do I have any regrets going with the Hemi over the CTD? In short no. I would say just get the truck and engine that you want and be happy!

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Old 05-03-2016, 04:48 AM   #49
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Perhaps you drove south a long ways? That is always downhill while north is uphill.
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Old 05-03-2016, 09:13 AM   #50
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I guess the main reasons I chose the Cummins over the 6.4L for my Ram:

I had a 5.7L Tundra and figured a similar V8 in a much heavier chassis of a 3/4t truck would have less performance and fuel mileage. I never test drove a Ram, Ford or Chevy gas 3/4t. Maybe I should have.

I viewed the Fast Lane Truck video of the Ram with the 6.4L and it didn't perform as well as other gas powered trucks.

Because we want to travel the West extensively in the next couple of years I decided the diesel may be the better option.

I've had to tow over some steep hill out here in the Ozarks and I'm pretty impressed with the tow haul/diesel exhaust brake features of my Ram. I've hardly had to use the brakes while vehicles ahead of me are riding the brakes.

Being a first time diesel owner the refueling process concerns me. I know most stations have diesel but the pumps are usually located on one or two outside islands and often the center gas islands are empty of cars but the end cap pumps with diesel/gas are often taken up by cars getting gas. More of inconvenience than anything else.

I'm also concerned with getting either bad diesel or using bio-diesel. My Cummins supports B20 but all the local diesel here is #2 but once on long trips there may be times I will be forced to use biodiesel up to B20. Not sure why a Cummins a few years older only supports up to B5 while mine supports B20, unless Ram made changes to the emissions equipment to allow it. Can't imagine the Cummins engine has changed in the few years.

Anyway, I made my purchase decision and I'm stuck with the truck, but so far so good.

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Old 05-03-2016, 10:02 AM   #51
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Kelvin, I completely share in your frustration at the pump. I drive a VW diesel as my daily driver and have a RAM Cummins as a tow vehicle. Most of the stations around here just have diesel on the end pumps and as you say, those pumps are almost always taken by people getting gas. All other islands at the station may be empty, but people buying gas (not diesel) have the end pumps tied up. They always look at me crazy when I pull up right behind them with all the other empty pumps at the station. It is a huge "pet peeve" of mine. I wish they would either put diesel at all the islands or have diesel only islands.

Oh, in keeping with the original thread, I love my towing with my diesel. It tows effortlessly, but the exhaust brake is the real clincher for me.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:05 AM   #52
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KJRitchie,
Don't sweat the small stuff about fuel stations. Truck stops just make the fueling easier as there is more room to turn around. Usually the smaller stations will have diesel on an end island which helps you negotiate around the steel bollards. After getting fuel a few times with the trailer hooked up you will realize that's its not a big deal.
b20 fuel - the only thing that has changed on the Ram trucks is the fuel filtration and water separation which has gotten better. There is a factory upgrade available for older trucks like mine (09) to bring it up to the newer filtration standard which I have installed.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:58 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by switz View Post
Perhaps you drove south a long ways? That is always downhill while north is uphill.
Nope. The direction was east with the same grades when I was going west. Maybe a tailwind?

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Old 05-07-2016, 05:16 AM   #54
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Fuel mileage

My experience is the full mileage I get on any one tank is highly dependent on wind conditions. And, sometimes I pull at 65 mph, others at 62. Also, hills (eastern half of USA) vs. mountains (western half) can make a big difference.

As noted some of us have added larger fuel tanks to our diesels. And, I usually put in about 50 - 65 gallons on a fill, so, if I am getting less than good diesel, I will be diluting this with the remaining 30 gallons in the tank.

One caveat with diesel, purchase a box of disposable gloves. Diesel fuel is not what you want to get on your hands as it tends to smell for a long time and is tough to wash off.

I wonder if anyone has any data on reliability of gasoline engines vs. diesel in tow vehicles. For those of us who keep things (my TV has about 108,000 miles at present) this could be a factor in overall cost of operation.
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Old 05-07-2016, 05:43 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultradog View Post
Diesels stink.
The fuel stinks and the exhaust stinks.
And they're Noisy.
A gasser is far more pleasant to run. And to get all the longevity out of a diesel to make the original purchase price work out you have to run them like for 15 years. But who wants to drive a pickup that old?

Yes the fuel "stinks"....Gasoline "stinks" I don't want either on me.
As for the rest
What year are you in? Modern (2007 & >) diesels have so much filtration on the exhaust it all but eliminates any odor or black sot. Modern diesels are only marginally more noisy that a gas model when you stand outside next to it and from the interior it can actually be quieter because it does not rev as high when under a load.
Buy a truck you like and know that each has great things and bad things about it.

I like diesels they are made for working hard and run long.
I will say I have a 2009 Cummins and it is the 3rd diesel truck I have owned and I love it. It is a Mega cab 2500 4x4. It is also "my wifes" every day driver and she won't part with it.

Joe D
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Old 05-08-2016, 12:10 PM   #56
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I think Ultradog has not driven a modern Diesel engine. I'm confident, especially while towing that the new Diesel engines are quieter and much more pleasant to drive. Of course if you like the manic screaming gasser every time it sees a small hill, then maybe a Diesel is not for you.

I have an opportunity to work with many of the delivery services that deliver travel trailers for a living. Take a look at what these guys are using, and you will not find a gas powered unit. It is not uncommon for these guys to put a million miles or more on a Diesel engine, and I doubt that a gasser would ever make it to half of that especially if it was being worked on a daily basis.

While I will never see a million miles, I know my Cummins will last the rest of my life as long as I take care of it. I'm looking forward to many more miles!
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