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Old 03-03-2012, 07:00 PM   #15
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So in summary: Diesels are great.
You mean the older diesels are great, like yours and rednax's.
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Old 03-03-2012, 07:14 PM   #16
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CTD's rule for mpg and longevity. The triple nickle motor is the one to have with the man trans behind it. I'm planning on changing the 3.73 gears to 3.42 for increased economy by getting the 1,300-1,500 rpm sweet spot (per Cummins info) closer to my Fourth and Direct best cruise range for town and country driving. 22-mpg average all miles past 37k. Or, 15-cpm fuel cost solo, and 25-cpm fuel cost towing (at $4/gl).

These trucks are already overpowered for trailers of under 16k. So the even higher power numbers of 2012 make even less sense given higher adjusted purchase price and complex exhaust treatment (one could buy a crate Hemi engine and auto trans for the cost of the emissions package on a diesel, literally) and potential reliability concerns.

And six speed autos plus the most modern V8's (or DI V6's) are beyond powerful compared to 20 or 30 years ago with much better mpg.

Still, no A/S actually needs a pickup truck. Maybe for a full-timer. If fuel goes to $5/gl, what then? Etc.

We all pulled these trailers, not just A/S, of up to 8-9k gross with cars into the 1980's. Got used to 7-mpg (and convert the fuel price of 1980 to today, whooee!).


.
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Old 03-03-2012, 11:42 PM   #17
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Do any non-diesel vehicles have engine brakes?

I've taken my current trailer (all 1,560 pounds of it) on US36 between Estes Park and Grand Lake CO, a route which climbs over 12,000 feet. On the steep downhills, that small trailer was enough to push my 3.0 liter minivan past the safe speed, even with the car in first gear. The brakes got mighty hot.

I suppose a 6 liter truck would have double the engine braking power, but that wouldn't be enough if we get the 6,000 pound AS we're dreaming of.

So are the only choices get a diesel / stay off that road?
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Old 03-04-2012, 01:32 AM   #18
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Gas engines don't have exhaust brake, but they do have a couple of features which enhance engine braking:
1. They tend to have high redlines.
2, They have throttle which increases pumping loss, generally an undesirable feature. But for engine braking it is good.

Diesel good: Effortless torque and power, efficiency.
Diesel bad: Complexity, transitional technology, very high fuel pressures in some instances (expensive injection system sensitive to fuel quality).
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Old 03-04-2012, 02:30 AM   #19
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FYI,

Link to explanation of difference between diesel and jet fuel:

What is the Difference Between Jet Fuel & Diesel Fuel? | eHow.com

Link to explanation of "Jake Brake" (compression release diesel engine brake):

Compression release engine brake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-04-2012, 04:48 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquared View Post
Do any non-diesel vehicles have engine brakes?

I've taken my current trailer (all 1,560 pounds of it) on US36 between Estes Park and Grand Lake CO, a route which climbs over 12,000 feet. On the steep downhills, that small trailer was enough to push my 3.0 liter minivan past the safe speed, even with the car in first gear. The brakes got mighty hot.

I suppose a 6 liter truck would have double the engine braking power, but that wouldn't be enough if we get the 6,000 pound AS we're dreaming of.

So are the only choices get a diesel / stay off that road?
Years ago there was an aftermarket gasoline engine exhaust brake called The Mountain Tamer by an outfit in Arizona. I always wished I'd had the opportunity to get one and the optional accessory parts as it would have been useful for fuel economy, not just grade descents.

As to how to descend your experience is more one of better utilizing vehicle gearing against road speed plus braking technique (and the subject of other, specific threads; search).

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Old 03-04-2012, 07:01 AM   #21
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Not a necessity of course, but very happy we bought the diesel - my first one.

Would buy it again, Gobs of torque and it just seems such a relaxing tow with nothing seeming to being close to being strained.

We are getting about 12.4 towing at typically 65-70mph with a 31 footer.

Apart from the initial cost (some of which I presume will be recouped upon selling) the only minor downside I have found is that when towing (other than on interstates with the many Pilots, Flying J's etc. It can be a tad more difficult to fuel up - now I must not only find a gas station with readily accessible pumps, but also one with diesel, and then try to guess where they have put the diesel pump as I approach! Not really a big deal though.

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Old 03-04-2012, 09:03 AM   #22
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With the encouragement and support of Mrs. evil, I was able to suspend my Luddite tendencies long enough to buy an F-150 with the Ecoboost engine.

I haven't done enough towing with it yet to tell if I've made another mistake, but I do know that if Mr. Ahmadinejad acts up, I'm going to feel pretty smart.
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:20 AM   #23
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Lots of opinions, and here is mine.

I like my diesel. I will replace it with another.

All the hoopla is just that, someone's own opinion about what they feel is the best. Some folks just like to argue and post lots of words in an attempt to validate their opinion.

Test drive several rigs, take your time and pick the rig you like and are willing to afford.

Best Regards,
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Old 03-04-2012, 01:30 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquared View Post
Do any non-diesel vehicles have engine brakes?

I suppose a 6 liter truck would have double the engine braking power, but that wouldn't be enough if we get the 6,000 pound AS we're dreaming of.

So are the only choices get a diesel / stay off that road?
Engine braking works for gas or diesel. Diesel braking is more pronounced because of higher compression. My late model gas truck actually has more effective engine braking than my old diesel. The reason is the integrated engine/braking controller.

The truck has an inclinometer and knows if the trailer is hooked up, so when it starts going downhill the tranny/engine controller automatically puts itself in "downhill tow mode". All I do is touch the brake which causes a downshift, and the torque converter locks. This provides effective engine braking and I can ease off the brake. More brake pressure causes more downshifts as needed. It is seamless, automatic and provides more effective engine braking than our old diesel. I need little brake pressure in the mountains and do not even have to think about it.
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Old 03-04-2012, 07:34 PM   #25
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(Very nice description, Wayward)
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