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Old 04-03-2013, 09:15 PM   #15
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It was explained to me that if you get into a situation in the rain where the road wheels lose traction, like when you aqua-plane, the cruise control detects that the wheels are moving more slowly and heaps on the power to try to get the wheels going at the right speed again, which is probably not what you want if you are aqua-planing.
All this may have been true at one time, but the first thing that happens with ANY activation of Stability control, traction control, etc, is automatic and instantaneous disengagement of cruise control. At least on GM vehicles, and I suspect on most others as well.
Use it whenever you are comfortable with it. I also disengage in heavy traffic or in hilly terrain where I don't like the power apply logic. Cruise control can't anticipate like a driver can....just yet. In a couple of years cars will "see" what's ahead and will be able to anticipate a lot of things. Cadillac first, then filtered down to a lot of vehicles.
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Old 04-03-2013, 09:34 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by dznf0g View Post
All this may have been true at one time, but the first thing that happens with ANY activation of Stability control, traction control, etc, is automatic and instantaneous disengagement of cruise control. At least on GM vehicles, and I suspect on most others as well.
You're absolutely right, Rich, I tend to forget that it's there. My Toyota stability thing is excellent and I have a hard time getting the Sienna to do anything naughty at all on the snow, much to the relief of my step-kids who do not like my displays of handbrake turns and drifting in the other car!

I should point out that I'm not hitched to the Airstream whilst attempting said snow acrobatics....
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Old 04-03-2013, 09:42 PM   #17
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I believe you can get better mileage by not using CC. Because when you approach a hill and the speed starts to drop off. The CC effectively puts the throttle to the floor. Wasting fuel in an effort to bring the speed back to the set point.
That said, I do use it on occasion. To give the leg a rest.
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:42 PM   #18
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I watch the EGT gage and manually shift the automatic to keep the turbo charger temperatures in a safe range. I use the CC on the level or mild hills.
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Old 04-04-2013, 12:04 AM   #19
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Not safe on slippery roads, and not good for the transmission if it is shifting down repeatedly. If it is shifting down too much, you are probably in too high a gear and below the needed torque range, move it down a gear. If it still shifts down repeatedly, you probably have too small an engine or too big a load. For most gas engines on steep grades you should take it out of cruise control and manually select the gear/rpm/speed to comfortably go up (and down) the grade.

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Old 04-04-2013, 07:54 AM   #20
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Not safe on slippery roads, and not good for the transmission if it is shifting down repeatedly. If it is shifting down too much, you are probably in too high a gear and below the needed torque range, move it down a gear. If it still shifts down repeatedly, you probably have too small an engine or too big a load. For most gas engines on steep grades you should take it out of cruise control and manually select the gear/rpm/speed to comfortably go up (and down) the grade.

doug k
This is really not a function of CC, IMO. If there is shift business, manually shift down and use cruise in the lower manually selected gear, just as you would with the human foot cruise control. As to slippery roads....again, on reasonably new vehicles, traction control will de-activate cruise if any slippage is present. A non-issue IMPO. (Snow/ice excluded...cruise isn't a great idea...towing or not.)
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:35 PM   #21
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I watch the EGT gage and manually shift the automatic to keep the turbo charger temperatures in a safe range. I use the CC on the level or mild hills.
Is this a way of saying you've gone around emissions controls with a tuner? I can't imagine that the engine command software would allow the CC to overheat the engine components. Or, do you just have a lower-than-factory tolerance on acceptable turbo temp ranges?

Your TT and mine are well below the anticipated weights & loads (aero) for which these trucks were designed. That said, on my '04 the CC is aggressive . . which I rather like. Though in hills I'll shut it off. But otherwise it is on before the highway entrance ramp ends.

The truck industry long ago proved that CC is favorable for mpg. It is a heckuva lot of work to do it as well for average mpg, over thousands of miles.

It's a great tool, is CC.

GM's had lousy throttle linkage back in the days of carburetors. But CHRYSLER used fully mechanical linkage (rods) that was much easier to "feel" that throttle and hold a setting. Thankfully, those days are gone as I in no way would have the energy of a 16-year old in controlling a V8-440 pulling an 8k TT. But, where Dad could get 8, I could get 11. A 25% improvement I wouldn't even attempt today, ha! The old vacuum-controlled cruise controls from that era were lucky to maintain 5-mph of the target speed with any grades.

Today they are much, much better.

.
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Old 04-06-2013, 07:41 AM   #22
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Is this a way of saying you've gone around emissions controls with a tuner? I can't imagine that the engine command software would allow the CC to overheat the engine components. Or, do you just have a lower-than-factory tolerance on acceptable turbo temp ranges?

Your TT and mine are well below the anticipated weights & loads (aero) for which these trucks were designed. That said, on my '04 the CC is aggressive . . which I rather like. Though in hills I'll shut it off. But otherwise it is on before the highway entrance ramp ends.

The truck industry long ago proved that CC is favorable for mpg. It is a heckuva lot of work to do it as well for average mpg, over thousands of miles.

It's a great tool, is CC.

GM's had lousy throttle linkage back in the days of carburetors. But CHRYSLER used fully mechanical linkage (rods) that was much easier to "feel" that throttle and hold a setting. Thankfully, those days are gone as I in no way would have the energy of a 16-year old in controlling a V8-440 pulling an 8k TT. But, where Dad could get 8, I could get 11. A 25% improvement I wouldn't even attempt today, ha! The old vacuum-controlled cruise controls from that era were lucky to maintain 5-mph of the target speed with any grades.

Today they are much, much better.

.
Yes, today the only moving part is the same direct throttle plate motor that the "fly by wire" gas pedal uses to control throttle with your foot.
Today's CC is fully electronically integrated into the powertrain algorithms and reacts accordingly.
Relative to some of the above posts, I have even had it disengage under a towing load trying to maintain speed on a steep grade. I believe there is a max throttle opening at a given road speed in the logic that disengages it.
It's your preference, of course, but a lot of the objections raised above are moot in today's systems.
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Old 04-06-2013, 12:25 PM   #23
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I had the EGT alarm set for 1250 degrees. My engineer son suggested raising the alarm to 1350 degrees. I just did not desire to melt crucial aluminum parts.

I find that using 6th can cause higher EGT than running in 5th with more air flow. With the 3.73 rear end, 2,150 rpm in 5th is 65mph.

The truck engine is stock except for enhanced filtration of the diesel fuel, engine oil and transmission fluid.
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Old 04-06-2013, 12:44 PM   #24
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Cruise control is wonderful on those long, flat endless drives (the Florida Turnpike springs to mind as does I-10 from Lake City, FL to El Paso).

Once in the foothills then I just surrender to the dark side and both shifting and throttle are manual. I don't much care for how the CC is programmed in the Titan as far as downshifts are concerned--seems late all the time.

Sooner than later I expect predictive programming will allow full time CC but not in my old truck...

Mike
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Old 04-06-2013, 12:54 PM   #25
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I use the cruise when traffic is light as I have a tendency to "put the hammer down" and will be running 70-75 before I know it. I have a DPTuner and use +80 HP Towing mode which causes the engine to respond to CC corrections quicker avoiding the tendency of throttle overshoot on short hills. The tuner towing mode shifts down at a lower RPM than stock in an effort to avoid lugging. I do not use CC on big inclines and run throttle and gears as per the EGT Pyrometer (Limit to 1200 degrees) as Honey Badger 7.3 will melt the turbo and itself in an effort to complete a climbing task in 80HP mode if not controlled. I also added a engine brake mode to engage the Exhaust Backpressure Valve when descending on long grades to provide some engine braking. I think all the new trucks accomplish all of this with the "TOW" button. - Brad
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Old 04-06-2013, 02:44 PM   #26
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Unless the road is wet/slick I use mine all of the time. I also keep the trans in tow/haul mode.

With my truck/trailer combination I have never had a problem with this and haven't had to take it out of cruise to manually downshift. FYI - I regularly travel between the Seattle area and Southern California and so do encounter a fair number of grades along the way.
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Old 04-06-2013, 03:14 PM   #27
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I use mine all the time, conditions permitting.

The one quirk about my diesel while towing is that the cruise control doesn't really get the concept of turbo lag. So, we'll be climbing a hill, and the cruise is pushing harder and harder on the throttle, but there's almost no response because the turbo hasn't gotten its act together. Then, suddenly, "Here's that heaping bowl of power you requested!" at the same time we crest the hill, and we're doing 80 mph. Wheeeee!

So, I watch for that quirk. I just apply more throttle to keep the engine "ahead" of the need for power. A cruise control can't see ahead and realize you have a hill to climb or descend. It can only react.
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Old 04-06-2013, 04:57 PM   #28
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On a flat level road I use cruise control to achieve better fuel economy. Traffic and hilly terrain then I turn it off.
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