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Old 08-07-2013, 10:26 AM   #15
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I towed our 1992 34" Limited for two years with a '94 Chevy 1500 with a 5.7L (pre-Vortec) engine. It weighed (on a Flying J scale) more than 8,400 lbs loaded and on the road. My Chevy had a 3.76 differential and I installed an extra transmission cooler.

If you choose to tow with what you've described you'll have be extremely cautious and ultra alert to what is ahead. I got into a few hard pulls that I didn’t think I be able to get over. Handling and braking were never an issue.


So-- CAN you tow a 34'? Yes. SHOULD you? Maybe. WILL YOU BE HAPPY? Not in my humble opinion!


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Old 08-07-2013, 11:59 AM   #16
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3.42 gear ratio is not a good towing gear especially if you are traveling any mountainous areas. Basically the lower the number( a higher gear ratio) the less pulling power you have but will get better gas millage at highway speeds. The higher the number( 3.76, 4.11 etc. the lower the gear ratio) gives you more power to pull but will cause the engine to turn higher rpm at highway speed so it effects gas millage. The happy medium is in their somewhere and all that depends on what you are pulling and what kind of terrain you will be towing in. I personally wouldn't pull a 34' whatever (any TT) with a half ton truck much less these small suv and mini vans the canadians seem to use. The numbers may work on paper but that doesn't translate to real world experience and COMFORT when driving. Just because the numbers say it will work if you are not comfortable and relaxed when towing then it will be a miserable experience.(I know all you Andy groupies will tell me you are comfortable and it is safe) If you don't want to upgrade to a more heavy duty TV then you might look at a smaller TT somewhere less than 30 ft. If it won't safely pull it without a WD hitch then you don't need to be towing it.( before everybody get their panties in a wad over this one a WD was never intended to make a vehicle carry weight it wasn't meant to.If a vehicle can tow it then the WD hitch will make it safer)
Thinking you have never had the experience of driving an Andy T set up.
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Old 08-07-2013, 01:55 PM   #17
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Yes, your truck will pull it.
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Old 08-07-2013, 02:03 PM   #18
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Please feel free to correct me, but to the best of my knowledge, except in an emergency situation, i.e. trailer brake failure, the vehicle should never stop the trailer - if anything, it should be the other way around, with the total stopping distance somewhat reduced with a trailer in tow.

Even with a brake failure in the trailer, gently does the trick. My first towing experience was with un-braked horse trailers, you hit the brakes too hard, they would come around and bite you in the butt.

Should the brakes on a trailer ever fail, the worst reaction would be to hit the brakes of the TV too hard.
I guess I'm a "belt & suspenders" type of guy when it comes to towing. I make sure my TV can stop my rig. I make sure my Airstream can stop my rig. Anything wrong with this idea?
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Old 08-07-2013, 03:30 PM   #19
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The numbers may work on paper but that doesn't translate to real world experience and COMFORT when driving. Just because the numbers say it will work if you are not comfortable and relaxed when towing then it will be a miserable experience.
The real world experience of the many people towing with just such a setup tells us that it can be both a comfortable and relaxed experience.

Modern minivans have ample power and more than adequate payload for many setups. Add to this a low centre of gravity and a wider wheel stance and you've got a very capable tow vehicle.

As I've said before I would not use a rig like that to cross the Rockies or boondock in the desert, but for most anything else it works perfectly fine. Just make sure to stay within the published limits, i.e don't overload the axles or exceed the total payload. Especially with a new, heavier trailer those can easily be exceeded.
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Old 08-07-2013, 03:38 PM   #20
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I guess I'm a "belt & suspenders" type of guy when it comes to towing. I make sure my TV can stop my rig. I make sure my Airstream can stop my rig. Anything wrong with this idea?
Absolutely nothing. But the assumption that you need a huge truck to stop a rig is incorrect. In the event of total brake failure of the trailer, over-braking with the TV is the worst possible action.

All you need to make sure of is that the TV has enough brake power to bring the rig to a controlled, gentle, stop. That should be the case for almost any vehicle strong enough to tow the trailer in the first place.
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Old 08-07-2013, 06:53 PM   #21
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Absolutely nothing. But the assumption that you need a huge truck to stop a rig is incorrect. In the event of total brake failure of the trailer, over-braking with the TV is the worst possible action.

All you need to make sure of is that the TV has enough brake power to bring the rig to a controlled, gentle, stop. That should be the case for almost any vehicle strong enough to tow the trailer in the first place.
Never been in an emergency situation and the trailer brakes have gone out have you? Had a loaded equipment trailer ( loaded with about 9000 ponds) didn't know the trailer plug had been pulled loose accidentally and had to stop very quickly. Needless to say when I got stopped and got my composure back I didn't hit anything but ruined 6 tires on my dually from flat spots where the trailer pushed me down the road. So all you guys that push these vehicles to their load limits because it says on paper it will pull it GOOD LUCK because your luck will run out one day if you tow enough miles. Remember just because you can pull it doesn't mean you can stop it or control it.
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Old 08-07-2013, 08:41 PM   #22
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I learned towing on a farm. Fully loaded hay trailers, no brakes. I know what happens if you hit the brakes too hard on a setup like that.
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Old 08-07-2013, 08:48 PM   #23
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You already have the truck. Make it work. Electric brake controller. Good weight distributing anti-sway hitch.
It will be fine. I have towed with a lot less.
I have towed with the 5.7, 5.3, and 4.8.
In some ways the 5.3 outperforms the old 5.7.
The 5.3 seems to have better acceleration, more power, and better fuel economy than the 5.7.
Some of the difference may be in transmissions and rear end gears.
Get that beautiful trailer, pull it with your Chevy, and be happy.
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Old 08-07-2013, 09:01 PM   #24
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I have a 2012 silverado crew cab and tow a FC 19 like its not back there, when we upgrade to a 23 or 25, I'm getting a igger truck
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Old 08-08-2013, 07:30 AM   #25
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My tv was my 1998 Chevy 1500 ext 5.7 litre automatic 3.73 factory towing package which mainly consists of engine oil and transmission coolers. I had always used synthetic lubricants including rear axle. I had 2004 Jayco 29Y. Not nearly the dry weight of AS. I was about 5100 dry, so roughly 6200 curb. Half ton trucks came quite a way in that 10 years. In 2005 I towed from Dayton, OH thru Mount Rushmore, Cody, Yellowstone, Teton and Colorado Springs. I was over 11,000 feet towing 3 times on that trip. I was lugged down to 45 mph a couple long grades but was passing some. 99% of that trip was locked in 3rd gear (out of overdrive) running 70 mph which is about 3500 rpm. The way they are designed this is in about the peak of the power band or torque curve. Yes it may seem like a lot of rpm but engine is actually in its happy place. Owners manual will typically tell you Not to tow in overdrive mode. That's what the button with a little picture of a trailer is for. It locks trans out of overdrive. You know you are towing too much for the gear YOU have selected if it shifts back and forth. If you start up a grade and tv shifts itself down so it is happy, you should pull it into that gear and leave it until cresting that grade. When trans begins hunting for gears it creates heat. Heat for transmissions as it is with tires is bad. Key is keeping trans and tires happy. Cool is happy.
I towed 4008 miles at 3500 rpm that trip.
She is still happy today. Maintenance baby, maintenance.
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Old 08-08-2013, 07:32 AM   #26
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My 05 1500 is used to tow a 30 classic. I have 3:73 rear and do little mtn towing. Im upgrading next year to a 15 2500 gasser.
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