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Old 09-14-2013, 03:48 PM   #29
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7.3

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Originally Posted by tailpipe View Post
I do know this, a 7.3 if the antifreeze has not been maintained correctly you could spend major bucks when water jacket cavitation eats through a cylinder. A risky gamble in my book. My dollar is on a 5.9 Cummins pre 2007 or a gasser
Check ford TSB (technical service bullitens) the problem was on the early 7.3 made by international (pre turbo) not the 7.3 powerstrokes. The cavitation problems would erode the cylinder walls especially on the rear cylinders unless additive was used in the antifreeze. The later 7.3 didn't have the same issues but Ford recomends you still need to put the additive in the antifreeze.
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Old 09-14-2013, 06:02 PM   #30
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Hope you added a "Comments" column to your spreadsheet. LOL - I knew you would get a little feedback.
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:17 PM   #31
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Great and timely information. I've been struggling with the TV question for three years. Renting F-350s and RAM 2500s, and borrowing a RAM from a friend this year. Returned to the islands from Colorado last night, and have been researching used trucks for the past two weeks. Looking at similar budget, say 12-15K. I need to tow the 27FB all through the Rockies and sometimes to Texas and back. I've been looking for a 94-03 F250 4x4, in any config shorter than the full crew cab/full bed thing. And with the 7.3 Powerstroke. Automatic trans. Tow package.

I'm having a hard time finding anything online that doesn't look totally beat to crap and has over 200,000 miles on it, in that price range. I understand about the 200k miles being no big deal in a well maintained engine, but how can you really know that for either gas or diesel, when you're going to be buying something that likely has been sold at auction and had several owners before you? It's a crap shoot. As for reaching 500,,000 miles, it's a good indication of engine design but practically? Would you want to be driving a vehicle that old? Honestly, I doubt I would put another 5K miles on it in any one year. Most years would be much less than that. I'm 62 years old. Do the math. In 20 years if I did this EVERY year, I'd put another 100K on it. Real life? I'd decide to dump it and buy something else when the used ecoboost prices come down.

What's really gotten my interest in this discussion so far is the relative maintenance and replacement costs for gas vs diesel. Lets say, it's worst case and you get a real lemon. What's the cost of dropping a new short block, or complete junkyard engine in, gas vs diesel? I say worst case, because if it was best case everything works out and whatever you bought is perfect, and the diesel vs gas thing is just rhetoric.

That's worse case, isn't it? I get the truck towed to a shop and tell them they got til next summer to swap out engines and send me the bill?

Another thing here catching my attention ( thank you very much) is that it sounds like it may be possible that a Ford 6.0 diesel would be a great choice if you can find a good one. This might be the time to consider lining up a couple potentials and hiring a mechanic for the day. Would be worth it, because the 6.0 Powerstrokes are fairly easy to find.. Much more so than the 7.3s You can get mo' truck for less money.

The Can Am option doesn't work for me. We get off the pavement sometimes. In fact, if AS ever comes out with an off-road version with more clearance and suspension we'd be interested.
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:52 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gringo View Post
Great and timely information. I've been struggling with the TV question for three years. Renting F-350s and RAM 2500s, and borrowing a RAM from a friend this year. Returned to the islands from Colorado last night, and have been researching used trucks for the past two weeks. Looking at similar budget, say 12-15K. I need to tow the 27FB all through the Rockies and sometimes to Texas and back. I've been looking for a 94-03 F250 4x4, in any config shorter than the full crew cab/full bed thing. And with the 7.3 Powerstroke. Automatic trans. Tow package.

I'm having a hard time finding anything online that doesn't look totally beat to crap and has over 200,000 miles on it, in that price range.
Spending an extra $5,000 would be money well spent.

Any truck that old will develop problems over time but for $20k you should be able to get something that is caught up on maintenance and that has body, upholstery, and glass in good condition.

Quote:
I understand about the 200k miles being no big deal in a well maintained engine, but how can you really know that for either gas or diesel, when you're going to be buying something that likely has been sold at auction and had several owners before you? It's a crap shoot. As for reaching 500,,000 miles, it's a good indication of engine design but practically? Would you want to be driving a vehicle that old?
Never mind the engine, it's the body, interior, front end, engine accessories, driveline, etc., you get the idea, that cost $$$$

Quote:
What's really gotten my interest in this discussion so far is the relative maintenance and replacement costs for gas vs diesel. Lets say, it's worst case and you get a real lemon. What's the cost of dropping a new short block, or complete junkyard engine in, gas vs diesel? I say worst case, because if it was best case everything works out and whatever you bought is perfect, and the diesel vs gas thing is just rhetoric.
For gassers you can usually buy a rebuilt short block and have it installed for around $3k-$4k if you don't replace anything else at the same time. Me, if I go through all that it will also have new water pump, alternator, power steering pump, hoses, starter, belt, idler, and engine management (water temp, o2, oil pressure, egr, etc) which can add another $1k.

With gassers it's pretty rare these days for there to be internal engine failures without warning and cumulative wear doesn't usually become a problem until beyond 200,000 miles. There are exceptions with various engines all having weak points somewhere and with engines that have been run without oil at some point in the past being susceptible to failure. Usually a compression check and an oil analysis will catch this sort of stuff in advance.

The thing with diesels is that there are other more common expensive points of failure which vary from one engine to the next, intercoolers, turbos, injection pumps, oil coolers, etc., and in many cases these components can fail without much warning.
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:55 PM   #33
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7.3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gringo View Post
Great and timely information. I've been struggling with the TV question for three years. Renting F-350s and RAM 2500s, and borrowing a RAM from a friend this year. Returned to the islands from Colorado last night, and have been researching used trucks for the past two weeks. Looking at similar budget, say 12-15K. I need to tow the 27FB all through the Rockies and sometimes to Texas and back. I've been looking for a 94-03 F250 4x4, in any config shorter than the full crew cab/full bed thing. And with the 7.3 Powerstroke. Automatic trans. Tow package.

I'm having a hard time finding anything online that doesn't look totally beat to crap and has over 200,000 miles on it, in that price range. I understand about the 200k miles being no big deal in a well maintained engine, but how can you really know that for either gas or diesel, when you're going to be buying something that likely has been sold at auction and had several owners before you? It's a crap shoot. As for reaching 500,,000 miles, it's a good indication of engine design but practically? Would you want to be driving a vehicle that old? Honestly, I doubt I would put another 5K miles on it in any one year. Most years would be much less than that. I'm 62 years old. Do the math. In 20 years if I did this EVERY year, I'd put another 100K on it. Real life? I'd decide to dump it and buy something else when the used ecoboost prices come down.

What's really gotten my interest in this discussion so far is the relative maintenance and replacement costs for gas vs diesel. Lets say, it's worst case and you get a real lemon. What's the cost of dropping a new short block, or complete junkyard engine in, gas vs diesel? I say worst case, because if it was best case everything works out and whatever you bought is perfect, and the diesel vs gas thing is just rhetoric.

That's worse case, isn't it? I get the truck towed to a shop and tell them they got til next summer to swap out engines and send me the bill?

Another thing here catching my attention ( thank you very much) is that it sounds like it may be possible that a Ford 6.0 diesel would be a great choice if you can find a good one. This might be the time to consider lining up a couple potentials and hiring a mechanic for the day. Would be worth it, because the 6.0 Powerstrokes are fairly easy to find.. Much more so than the 7.3s You can get mo' truck for less money.

The Can Am option doesn't work for me. We get off the pavement sometimes. In fact, if AS ever comes out with an off-road version with more clearance and suspension we'd be interested.
To address the engine cost replacement cost on the 7.3 will be about $10,000 for a complete remanufactured 7.3 parts and labor turn key. I had to replace one a few years back and found a low milage take out from a 2001 truck and gave $3200.00 for it. I have put over 100 thousand miles on that used one and still going strong.Don't know cost on gas replacement. Stay away from 6.0 trucks unless you can find one that already has had egr delete, head gaskets replaced and new studs put in heads. If it hasn't been done you will end up doing it that is why you can find them cheap with only 80 thousand miles plus. If you really want a 6.0 truck the hot ticket is to find and early cummins diesel and swap it into the 6.0 trucks. They make all the adapters to do this swap then you WILL HAVE THE BEST ENGINE AND TRUCK COMBINATION OUT THERE. The 6.0 trucks don't have alot of other issues. Try to buy from an individual (less likely it came thru an auction)instead of dealers that way you can find all the history on the vehicle and if it is a one owner that is even better
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Old 10-01-2013, 05:22 PM   #34
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Thanks.

I'm also finding out that there are a few Excursions around with the 7.3, and prices are slightly less than the F- series. Plus, you can pretty much be sure that the rear of the Excursions has never been loaded up with anything too rough. The beds on some of these F-250s I'm seeing look like something out of Mad Max.
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Old 10-01-2013, 06:15 PM   #35
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A Cummings in an Excursion would be a nice tow vehicle. The only thing I don't like about the Cummings is the noise. They sound like a train coming.

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Old 10-02-2013, 09:36 AM   #36
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I live on a small island between the Bahamas and Haiti. When I am in the US, I am staying in a hotel, with family, or in the Airstream. The chances of me putting a Dodge engine in a perfectly good Ford truck are something near zero.


You reckon the 5.9 Cummins is a better motor? Why?

I don't care about the noise. I'm half deaf anyhow. Diving, gunfire, and rock and roll music.
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Old 10-02-2013, 09:54 AM   #37
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Because the Cummings is regarded as being the best motor and the Fords are regarded as the best trucks. This was in the first decade of this century at least.

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Old 10-02-2013, 10:25 AM   #38
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I live on a small island between the Bahamas and Haiti. When I am in the US, I am staying in a hotel, with family, or in the Airstream. The chances of me putting a Dodge engine in a perfectly good Ford truck are something near zero.


You reckon the 5.9 Cummins is a better motor? Why?

I don't care about the noise. I'm half deaf anyhow. Diving, gunfire, and rock and roll music.
If it is a 6.0 ford truck then it is not a perfectly good ford truck. The early cummins doesn't have all the electronic bs to run it like the newer engines. It is not dependent on oil pressure to fire the injectors doesn't have injector pump problems that the later engines have and it is basically all mechanical. Anybody that can work on a farm tractor can work on one of those, you don't need all the electronic equipment to diagnose problems. The ford truck body is the better built of the heavy duty trucks so you combine the two and you have an almost bullet proof truck. A cummins powered excursion would be awesome. If it had the 7.3 I wouldn't swap it but 6.0 definitly.
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:37 PM   #39
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I'm only looking at 7.3's.

Considering all options, but have been a "Ford truck" guy since I was a kid. I once showed up at my uncles house in East Texas in a rented Chevy and my uncle asked me to park it out on the road. He didn't want the neighbors to think he had bought one.
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:54 PM   #40
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If it is a 6.0 ford truck then it is not a perfectly good ford truck. If it had the 7.3 I wouldn't swap it but 6.0 definitly.
I wouldn't trade my 6.0 for either the 7.3 or the Cummins. For the record, there are tons of 6.0s out there that have their original EGR, their original oil coolers and over 200k. Mine's modified (EGR/Cat delete, exhaust, fuel spring, coolant filter, etc) but it's a 480hp, 22mpg getting, tow a mountain beast that I'd pay to have repaired if I blew it up.
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Old 10-03-2013, 07:37 AM   #41
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Please, educate me about the 6.0. I am wondering, if I find a truck with a 6.0 and 150,000 miles on it, is it safe to assume that either it doesn't have any issues, or that any issues have long been resolved? How soon do the problems make themselves known?

Another question, if I bought a 6.0 and then found out it needed whatever it is they need, what would it cost to have it all done by a shop? Could I continue to drive the TV until it was convenient to put it in the shop, or do these issues stop it dead?

Our situation is such that the TV will be sitting, unused, for most of the year. The specs on that 6.0 look good.
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Old 10-03-2013, 08:45 AM   #42
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You want to find a truck that has not been abused. One that has been used as a car not as a truck. Many folks buy these big trucks just as a status symbol and they never use them as intended. I would stay away from anything with much over 100k on it. Let's say the engine is fine but the transmission is shot. That will be $4000 for a good rebuild. If you are really unlucky you could also have to lay out another $5000 to have the engine rebuilt or upgraded. You can buy alot of gas for what an ailing diesel will cost you over a gasser. If you go the used diesel route have it checked out by the dealer or a shop that specializes in these big trucks.


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