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Old 08-15-2013, 12:54 PM   #99
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Pharm, we have two 15 month olds and we are going for 6 long weekend campouts this summer (we've done four). They'll do fine.

You'll figure out your routine/tips and tricks.

We did buy one of the cages for outside (plastic toddler fence) so we have a 7'x7' area to safely have them in since they're too young to know to stay away from daddy while he's leveling the trailer or setting spring bars.

The ONLY little thing we're working on is bedtimes and campfires...
They go to bed around 7, but we have to creep past their playpens in the living room of the AS to get to our mid beds. Sometimes, instead of risking sneaking past them, we just also go to bed at 7 and lock ourselves in the back to read so we won't disturb them later.
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Old 08-15-2013, 08:44 PM   #100
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Luckily they are both very heavy sleepers
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Old 08-17-2013, 06:09 PM   #101
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Our twins are 14 months old, the older brother is three. Twins sleep in travel beds on top of what will become their real beds when they're old enough, the older one sleeps on the dinette.

We just had new vinyl flooring laid, for ease of cleanups. We also keep a stack of army blankets at hand, we buy them from surplus stores. They cover the dinette during the day, the gaucho, they serve as picnic blankets, emergency duvets, everything.

At the end of the trip they go into the washer and drier. They last forever and forgive most anything.
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Old 08-17-2013, 06:58 PM   #102
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Those are excellent ideas!
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Old 10-27-2013, 01:19 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by PharmGeek View Post
I think 60 will be right for me - I'm very conservative about driving believe me!!

My personal debate was 55 vs 65 - 60 is middle ground so there

I'll be watching mileage to indeed find a sweet spot

Good point switz
From experience: Use a range of 58 to 62-mph. 58 is the best fast fuel economy speed, and using 62 as an upper limit to approach a grade or get around someone even slower keeps numbers honest (fuel economy, and the like). The single exception to this is in passing on a two-lane. In that event, accelerating to full passing speed is done before moving into the oncoming lane . . thus the distance to the next town, etc, figures in. The penalty for fuel consumption can dictate whether it is worth it or not. At ten, sometimes twenty miles, it likely it not. One backs off and re-adjusts to the slower speed.

The records you keep ought to reflect climate, terrain and any large metro areas to traverse. A fuel cpm is also an indicator of vehicle wear. Find the fuel cpm average.

As to getting somewhere faster, departure times and controlling planned stops is where it counts (my income is dependent on these details; there are yet more layers). On any trip of up to 300-miles travelling faster is of no benefit, time-wise, and is contraindicated for cpm control, overall.

As 300-miles or three o'clock is a now-ancient RV maxim, use a planned itinerary (all stops) to make the most of your time . . it trumps travel speed (stupidities about "traffic flow", etc can be ignored) as the planned stops of fifteen-minutes every two-hours, and for an hour every four hours of driving (the fuel and lunch break) is the rhythm.

Learn to use the mirrors to advantage, and drop off your travel speed 5-8/mph when buses and eighteen-wheeler are going around you. Never hesitate to move to the left lane when four seconds from overtaking slower traffic . . there is no actual "right of way" for left lane traffic; the burden is on them, so to speak. Use it to your advantage as not to crowd up against others.

Planned stops, following distances, understood cpm penalties, etc, are where it's at. Travel speed is a filler, not the meat of the problem.

For those who say otherwise, the assumptions made about risk entailed is easily shot down. Braking distance is the golden standard . . and driver awareness is dependent on not only being rested, but in establishing good habits from the outset. Loss of control accidents have driver problems at center . . but assumptions about road signage, surface quality, etc, all play their part. GPS is a fallback . . check the published routing at start and end of trip planning the day ahead. One is only accomplishing a series of legs throughout the day. Set that, and the rest is easy.

A combined rig is work, so work in advance of departure to make driving as easy as possible.

.
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Old 10-27-2013, 01:38 PM   #104
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Best speed depends somewhat on the sweet spot for your particular engine and gearing. Diesels are particularly picky about the best RPM.

With the Duramax, 55 mph is too slow, the transmission shifts down more often, and fuel mileage is not any better. About 62 mph seems about best and I get good fuel mileage with very few shifts. At 65, I lose about 1 mpg. I run about 62 except in city freeways where I disrupt traffic less by pushing it up to 65.
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Old 10-27-2013, 03:30 PM   #105
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really good info here you all....T- 3 weeks and I hope to begin putting it to good use!

Braking distance for me is critical...I commute every day 1 hour each way and I know that this is likely a huge risk for me...when I drive I keep significant distance and have avoided 2 accidents so far as a result. clearly this applies when towing 7K+ lbs
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Old 10-27-2013, 04:31 PM   #106
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Do some tests to determine what your real stopping distance is at 60 MPH with the trailer in tow. Compare this to the tow vehicle alone. Normally you would use the 3 second rule when not towing. Which turns out to be 263 ft at 60 MPH. This is taking your reaction time and the stopping distance into account. You measure time by counting as soon as a car in front of you passes a sign or bridge etc. When you pass that same object you stop counting. With a trailer you might want to double or triple that lead time between you and the nearest car in front of you. It you are going 70 MPH. Then the following distance becomes 308 ft. The nice thing about the 3 second rule is the safe following distance adjusts for speed.

Perry
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Old 10-27-2013, 05:08 PM   #107
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I had been towing at 55 to save gas. Last week I started going 60. It doesn't seem to use any more gas at 60. I know by previous experimenting that it does use more gas at 70. I might try 65 some time for comparison to 70 and 60. Driving 55-60 does not bother me at all. Everybody else can go around me while I am saving gas.
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Old 10-27-2013, 06:33 PM   #108
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Inland Andy said that putting an Airspeed indicator in the tow vehicle was a good way to stay at 55 MPH wind speed. It does not matter what the ground speed is. The drag is a function of the wind velocity squared.

Perry
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Old 10-27-2013, 06:40 PM   #109
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Inland Andy said that putting an Airspeed indicator in the tow vehicle was a good way to stay at 55 MPH wind speed. It does not matter what the ground speed is. The drag is a function of the wind velocity squared.

Perry
Interesting!! Never thought of it that way
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Old 10-27-2013, 07:55 PM   #110
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Inland Andy said that putting an Airspeed indicator in the tow vehicle was a good way to stay at 55 MPH wind speed. It does not matter what the ground speed is. The drag is a function of the wind velocity squared.

Perry
I bet you could get one hell of a speeding ticket.
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Old 10-27-2013, 09:59 PM   #111
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Inland Andy said that putting an Airspeed indicator in the tow vehicle was a good way to stay at 55 MPH wind speed. It does not matter what the ground speed is. The drag is a function of the wind velocity squared.

Perry
OK,
This will measure the component of the airspeed that is parallel to your track. However since, unlike an aircraft, your trailer is attached to the ground, the component of the effective airspeed that is perpendicular to your track also will affect the total drag. This is because, among other things, the steering wheels must be turned into the wind to maintain the track on the road. This means all of the tires on both TV and TT will be rubbing sideways to some degree or another.

Also, this method of measuring speed fails to take into account the characteristics of the powertrain that make certain engine RPM more efficient that others.

So, in my opinion, as cute as it might be to have an airspeed meter in the tow vehicle, the cuteness would be the extent of its actual value.

Ken
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Old 10-27-2013, 10:58 PM   #112
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OK,
This will measure the component of the airspeed that is parallel to your track. However since, unlike an aircraft, your trailer is attached to the ground, the component of the effective airspeed that is perpendicular to your track also will affect the total drag. This is because, among other things, the steering wheels must be turned into the wind to maintain the track on the road. This means all of the tires on both TV and TT will be rubbing sideways to some degree or another.

Also, this method of measuring speed fails to take into account the characteristics of the powertrain that make certain engine RPM more efficient that others.

So, in my opinion, as cute as it might be to have an airspeed meter in the tow vehicle, the cuteness would be the extent of its actual value.

Ken
pedantic nerd challenge...I say that with admiration as a proud pedant myself..

(I have little/no physics expertise so I bow out of that debate )
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