Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-19-2018, 03:19 PM   #1
4 Rivet Member
 
AirstreamCSH's Avatar
 
2016 25' Flying Cloud
Huntington , New York
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 289
2013 Toyota 4Runner and 2019 Basecamp X

We are looking at towing a 2019 Basecamp X which has a GVWR of 3500# and a tongue weight of 435#.

Our potential tow vehicle is a 2013 Toyota 4Runner SR5 V6 which has a 5000# towing capacity. Currently has 80,000 miles. It didn't come with the optional factory tow package according to the window sticker but there is no reference I can find to tell me what that tow package would have consisted of. The vehicle has a Class 3 and wiring as STD per the brochure.

There is no figure shown in the Toyota brochure for the tongue weight so I've used the 10% rule of thumb to put it at 500#. Using the 80% rule, the GVWR is below the 4000# (5000 x 80%) so I'm good there.

Questions:
1) If the 80% rule gives me 400# on the tongue and the trailer is rated at 435, does this mean I need a WD hitch to offset this number down to 400#?
2) Since a factory tow package normally includes a transmission cooler, would you add an aftermarket cooler to this vehicle? If so, any recommendation on which ones to look at and which to avoid?
3) As there is no brake controller, I was looking at the Tekonsha Prodigy P3 based on internet reviews and previous ownership until I saw a listing on eTrailer for Redarc Tow-Pro Elite at twice the price. Any idea what you'd be getting for the higher price and if it is necessary. Both are "proportional" but the Redarc references an accelerometer.
4) For those of you who own and are familiar with the 4Runner (2013), I need to replace the tires and would appreciate any advise based on the intended purpose. Assume driving cross-country through all the mountain ranges East & West to get into reasonable gravel/dirt road places on BLM land or public parks for outdoor sports but nothing resembling a muddy off-road 4-wheeling experience.

I know this forum has a strong knowledge base so I'm putting this out there for your kind assistance. The vehicle will be driven by a younger drivers and it's being handed down by family so some of the choices have been made assuming no major errors in understanding.
__________________

AirstreamCSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2018, 03:44 PM   #2
Rivet Master

 
2007 22' International CCD
Corona , California
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 5,661
WD hitches are designed to transfer weight to the tow vehicle FRONT axle, and the trailer axle(s) while towing. in short, and there is TONS of discussion on the forums, the idea, as I see it, is to get the front axle weight back to what it was before you hooked up the trailer. You want to do this so the front wheels have the proper weight on them so you can steer and brake effectively. If I don't have enough WD cranked in, the Tacoma feels 'light' on the front end, understeers a lot, and 'porpoises' up and down on the road. That tells me to crank the WD heavier to get the front end under control.

My Tacoma has the factory towing package. It includes all the trailer wiring, a Transmission oil cooler, and an engine oil cooler, stiffer shocks, and some other handling enhancements like bigger, stiffer sway bars.

Prodigy P3 also uses accelerometer technology. Clue is that you can install it at a vertical angle, and it still works well. It does need to be aligned parallel tot he front-back axis of the vehicle, however. Mine sits with the control panel up at about 30 degrees, for example. It internally compensates for that automatically.

I like the way it handles the trailer brakes and works with my rig. In case you are not looking at this on a computer, its a 2012 crew cab shortbed 4x4 and we tow a 2007 22' International CCD with a ProPride hitch setup.
__________________

__________________
Rich, KE4GNK/AE, Overkill Engineering Dept.
'The Silver HamShack' ('07 International 22FB CCD 75th Anniversary)
Multiple Yaesu Ham Radios inside and many antennae sprouting from roof, ProPride hitch, Prodigy P2 controller.
2012 shortbed CrewMax 4x4 Toyota Tacoma TV with more antennae on it.
rmkrum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 06:46 AM   #3
4 Rivet Member
 
AirstreamCSH's Avatar
 
2016 25' Flying Cloud
Huntington , New York
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 289
Thank You. So stick with the P3 and put a WD on to get under 80% on tongue.

Any thoughts on the use of a transmission cooler?
AirstreamCSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 07:06 AM   #4
3 Rivet Member

 
2013 20' Flying Cloud
Westerly , Rhode Island
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirstreamCSH View Post
Thank You. So stick with the P3 and put a WD on to get under 80% on tongue.

Any thoughts on the use of a transmission cooler?
The WD won't get you under 80%, that's not what it does. Tongue weight measured at the receiver stays the same with and without WD. Difference is without WD all the trailer tongue weight and some of the TV front axle weight goes on the rear axle. WD keeps the front axle weight on the front axle and distributes some of trailer tongue weight to the front axle and trailer axle.

Going to the CAT scales and analyzing the numbers is well worth the time just to understand what's going on with axle loadings. Most interesting thing to me seeing how much weight from the front axle is transferred to the rear axle (when the front of your vehicle rises) without WD. So it would be easy to overload that rear axle without WD even though the tongue weight is within limits.
smithcreek is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 11:25 AM   #5
2 Rivet Member
 
2003 25' Safari
LAS VEGAS , Nevada
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirstreamCSH View Post
We are looking at towing a 2019 Basecamp X which has a GVWR of 3500# and a tongue weight of 435#.

Our potential tow vehicle is a 2013 Toyota 4Runner SR5 V6 which has a 5000# towing capacity. Currently has 80,000 miles. It didn't come with the optional factory tow package according to the window sticker but there is no reference I can find to tell me what that tow package would have consisted of. The vehicle has a Class 3 and wiring as STD per the brochure.

There is no figure shown in the Toyota brochure for the tongue weight so I've used the 10% rule of thumb to put it at 500#. Using the 80% rule, the GVWR is below the 4000# (5000 x 80%) so I'm good there.

Questions:
1) If the 80% rule gives me 400# on the tongue and the trailer is rated at 435, does this mean I need a WD hitch to offset this number down to 400#?
2) Since a factory tow package normally includes a transmission cooler, would you add an aftermarket cooler to this vehicle? If so, any recommendation on which ones to look at and which to avoid?
3) As there is no brake controller, I was looking at the Tekonsha Prodigy P3 based on internet reviews and previous ownership until I saw a listing on eTrailer for Redarc Tow-Pro Elite at twice the price. Any idea what you'd be getting for the higher price and if it is necessary. Both are "proportional" but the Redarc references an accelerometer.
4) For those of you who own and are familiar with the 4Runner (2013), I need to replace the tires and would appreciate any advise based on the intended purpose. Assume driving cross-country through all the mountain ranges East & West to get into reasonable gravel/dirt road places on BLM land or public parks for outdoor sports but nothing resembling a muddy off-road 4-wheeling experience.

I know this forum has a strong knowledge base so I'm putting this out there for your kind assistance. The vehicle will be driven by a younger drivers and it's being handed down by family so some of the choices have been made assuming no major errors in understanding.
THe tongue weight of a trailer (as advertised) is not a rating; it is a measured weight under some specific loading condition. You must weigh your trailer tongue weight (as you will load it for you travels) to determine your TW.

The TW capacity of your tow vehicle cannot be determined by rule of thumb; It is determined by the manufacturer and its choice of components like tires and axel capacity. Your tow vehicle may or may not have adequate TW capacity for your loaded trailer's tougue weight. The CAT scale is your best friend to determine what will safely work for you.
Abraham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 03:21 PM   #6
4 Rivet Member
 
GammaDog's Avatar
 
2014 25' FB Eddie Bauer
Vero Beach , Florida
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 458
Images: 26
Although I tow our AS with a 2014 a Tundra, before I had either the AS or Tundra I had a 2009 Tacoma (basically the pickup version of your 4Runner) and a tandem axle cargo trailer.

Toyota puts axle and gross weight limits (vehicle and combined) on the sticker on the driver's door pillar. Those values apply to your specific vehicle as built. They generally put tongue weight limits and other data that apply to all vehicles in the owners manual.

The 2013 4Runner owners manual (https://www.toyota.com/t3Portal/docu...f/OM35A22U.pdf) does not list a specific tongue weight limit. What it says is that the trailer weight limit is 5,000 lbs. and they expect tongue weight to be between 9 and 11% of any given trailer's actual weight. So... I'd say your tongue weight limit is 550 lbs. (11% of 5,000). Note that Toyota requires a sway control hitch for trailers with a gross weight over 2,000 for your vehicle. Assuming that the basecamp is over 2,000, you'll need one. In my experience, hitches wth sway control also provide weight distribution. Toyota specifically recommends the "100% Front Axle Load Restoration" setup for a weight distribution hitch on your vehicle. Post back if you need info on that approach. It's how I set up my Tundra.

P.S.: Nice icon pic! My dad and I restored a 1930 Ford coupe with a rumble seat which I dove to high school.
GammaDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 04:41 PM   #7
Rivet Master
 
2007 27' International CCD FB
San Diego , California
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 802
The 4Runner and Basecamp will make for a great pair! The Basecamp is light enough that it's not that much of a concern. But getting things dialed in right will make for a better towing setup that has more margin for stability in all scenarios.

I had a 2006 V8 4Runner. In that generation, from the factory, they had a weight bearing hitch and a stronger weight distributing hitch. Sounds like you have the lighter former version. It's not critical that you get the stronger version as your Basecamp is within the capacity of either. Though academically, if you want to use weight distribution, you should have the latter as it has more torsion support in its geometry.

Your stock tires will be just fine.

I would get a WD hitch for your setup. A simple, lightweight, and easy to use Anderson will fit the bill nicely. As mentioned rmkrum, it'll transfer weight back to the front axle. AND back to the trailer. Ensuring everything will ride nice and level.

It's also great as you mention you're getting a Basecamp-X, which I assume you'll take offroad. The Anderson is a cinch to relax the WD tension for offroad which you'll want. Most other WD setups will require removing the WD bars all-together.

As for the brake controller, both P3 and Redarc will work great. They are both accelerometer based, and proportional. Just comes down to which asethetic and mounting you like.

Enjoy!
__________________
Boondocking option package:
'07 27FB Ocean Breeze "See Turtle", 3" lift
'09 Lexus LX570, on 33's
pteck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2018, 06:07 AM   #8
4 Rivet Member
 
AirstreamCSH's Avatar
 
2016 25' Flying Cloud
Huntington , New York
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 289
These replies is what makes the forum so helpful for current and future visitors as well as directly assuaging my concerns. While I thought I understood the purpose of the Equalizer hitch, I think now I get what it does and also what to do with the CAT scale numbers. Thank You!
AirstreamCSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2018, 10:58 PM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
Martee's Avatar
 
2017 25' Flying Cloud
Waco , Texas
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 183
I did check with a local Toyota dealer here in Texas, and your specific model 2013 4-Runner comes with a surprisingly high 1585 lbs payload. That payload includes, weight of passengers, cargo, fuel and trailer tongue weight. Your 4-Runner should have no difficulties, safely towing that Basecamp with proper towing hitch.
__________________

Martee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Towing with my Toyota 4Runner geedubcpa Tow Vehicles 6 09-17-2012 10:36 PM
Weight capacity and towing Toyota 4runner V6 waf Tow Vehicles 2 03-10-2010 10:35 PM
Toyota 4runner towing capacity wonkabar Tow Vehicles 3 03-06-2009 08:38 PM
Toyota 4runner and 19' safari bebelee Tow Vehicles 5 02-14-2009 03:49 PM
Toyota 4Runner TV ? OhScottyOh Tow Vehicles 22 04-30-2008 11:47 PM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.