Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-11-2011, 02:37 PM   #1
3 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 140
2 wheels or 4

Hi, I'm looking into getting an Airstream. I haven't done a lot of towing and I'm looking for some opinions regarding single or double axel on units up to 24 or 25 feet. Presently driving a 3/4 ton 2wd pickup.
Thanks.
__________________

__________________
WRDinAZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 02:40 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
noreen&sal's Avatar
 
1981 27' Excella II
mays landing , South Jersey
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,179
Images: 9
When you find your Airstream , it will probably come with the right amount of wheels. Sal.
__________________

__________________
noreen&sal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 02:42 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
noreen&sal's Avatar
 
1981 27' Excella II
mays landing , South Jersey
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,179
Images: 9
With3/4 ton, you can tow any Airstream. Sal.
__________________
noreen&sal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 02:56 PM   #4
3 Rivet Member
 
1986 25' Sovereign
Plant City , Florida
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 225
Welcome to the forums. There is a wealth of knowledge here all at your finger tips!

As to your question,

The number of axles depends on the model and the length of the stream.

In general single axles will have less maintenance but will be quicker to react when backing up there for making it some what more difficult.

Twin axles will have more mmaintenance but will slower to react to driver input making it easier to back up.

As for three axles these only come on what I call the beast. That would be a 34' stream. You will have the most maintenance with this but the same applies as for two axles.

Most people when looking for a stream need to figure out how much room is needed for how many people. It is not uncommon for new buyers to want more room so save yourself some money and do it right the first time.

Cheers!

Chris
__________________
ck21084 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 03:00 PM   #5
Rivet Master
 
Dwight's Avatar
 
1999 34' Excella
Joshua , Texas
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 548
Images: 2
We have had two 34' trailers and even with our son now in college our 34' is still nice to have....and they pull like a dream....
__________________
History doesn't repeat itself, people do!
Dwight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 03:04 PM   #6
3 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 140
Thanks Chris, that's the sort of info I'm after.

How about at highway speeds. Do singles get more squirlly than duals, or do they pull fairly smooth?
__________________
WRDinAZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 03:08 PM   #7
4 Rivet Member
 
NicheVintage's Avatar
 
1965 26' Overlander
The Gorgeous Pac Northwest , Washington
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 445
Images: 34
We have been pleased with our twin axle AS. Its easy to tow and back into campsites. This is our first travel trailer and it was the best choice. The only down side is when you need new axles its twice the price. Enjoy your search.
__________________
NicheVintage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 04:23 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
AirsDream's Avatar
 
1999 23' Safari
Perrysburg , Ann Arbor
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 914
I think you'll find two axle trailers of similar length to be a bit more longitudinally stable but perhaps a bit harder to back up, as noted above. But they come with more cost, more maintenance expense, etc.

Two added advantages of a double axle rig: if you lose a tire to the inevitable (nail, curb, pothole, underinflation, etc. - your choice), you can limp along for quite a ways on three tires to get to a convenient place to change the tire. And once there, you can drive one tire on a side up onto a ramp to change the other tire on that side, so no jacking needed for tire change / wheel bearing repack, etc. Pretty convenient and arguably safer than using a jack, jack stands, etc.

Then again, some people just like the looks of a single axle rig, while others swear by the appearance of more axles. Just like some folks like to date blondes better, others brunettes. Go figure.
__________________
AirsDream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 04:26 PM   #9
Rivet Master
 
noreen&sal's Avatar
 
1981 27' Excella II
mays landing , South Jersey
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,179
Images: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirsDream View Post
I think you'll find two axle trailers of similar length to be a bit more longitudinally stable but perhaps a bit harder to back up, as noted above. But they come with more cost, more maintenance expense, etc.

Two added advantages of a double axle rig: if you lose a tire to the inevitable (nail, curb, pothole, underinflation, etc. - your choice), you can limp along for quite a ways on three tires to get to a convenient place to change the tire. And once there, you can drive one tire on a side up onto a ramp to change the other tire on that side, so no jacking needed for tire change / wheel bearing repack, etc. Pretty convenient and arguably safer than using a jack, jack stands, etc.

Then again, some people just like the looks of a single axle rig, while others swear by the appearance of more axles. Just like some folks like to date blondes better, others brunettes. Go figure.
You forgot those redheads. Sal.
__________________
noreen&sal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 04:29 PM   #10
Rivet Master
 
AirsDream's Avatar
 
1999 23' Safari
Perrysburg , Ann Arbor
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 914
Naw, didn't forget - I'm married to one ... they're just a rarer species, and not too many folks daring enough to take one on!
__________________
AirsDream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 05:09 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
RangerJay's Avatar
 
2002 19' Bambi
Northwestern Ontario , - on the backside of the map and just above the big green spot
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 818
Images: 44
Not having owned a trailer with two axles I can only comment on our experience with a single axle.

Backing up is simply not an issue - maybe it's a matter of getting used to what you've got - but backing has never presented itself as a problem in any form - in fact - single axle trailers are more often the shorter ones - and I can attest that we comfortably back into sites that many other trailer simply could not negotiate.

What may be more relevant is hitching up to a marginal tow vehicle - we towed for 6 seasons with a six-cylinder, short wheel base SUV - and in the first several years it was quick to feel the effects of passing trucks. I was told that our single axle trailer contributed to the problem. We eventually purchased a Hensley - and the effect of passing trucks totally disappeared - today I have no complaints about our single axle trailer.

Good Luck - whatever your choice.



Jay
__________________
Bambi - 2002 (The Toaster)
Pathfinder - 2009 (The Buggy)

"I'm not young enough to know everything ....."
(Oscar Wilde)
RangerJay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 05:12 PM   #12
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,709
The last two trailers I have owned have had two axles - before that I had single axle. It hasn't made much of a difference to me, but I will say, justified or not, I feel a bit safer with two axles in the event of a blow out.

As I expect you know, apart from the safety aspect,you can even tow for a limited distance at reduced speeds on three wheels if you happen to be caught in an area where it would be unwise to try changing a flat.

Having two axles makes it really easy to change a tire too. Just ride the adjacent trailer up onto a stack of blocks and the adjacent tire on the other axle will dangling in mid-air, no need for bottle jacks etc. Very quick, easy, and safe.


Brian
__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 05:24 PM   #13
Rivet Master
 
tkasten's Avatar
 
1965 22' Safari
Vassar , Michigan
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 847
Images: 6
Don't spend much time thinking about 1 or 2 axles. Spend your time looking at various trailer floor plans. What you like to have in the trailer will tend to determine the length. Do you like a full time double or queen size bed? How bout a dinette? Do you plan to do a lot of traveling or only some weekend boondocking. Once you determine what you want in a trailer then you can look at the floor plans that work for you. Shorter trailers tend to have single axles and longer trailers have 2 or even 3. Good Luck!
__________________
Tim
TAC MI 14

Everyday is a Saturday
tkasten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 05:32 PM   #14
Rivets?
 
nvestysly's Avatar

 
1992 29' Excella
2010 22' Interstate
Van By The River , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,522
Flat Tires with Two Axles

Last year I had a flat and it did not pose a problem at all (except for the rainy conditions that soaked me as I changed the tire). I simply pulled into a convenient, wide-open parking lot to change the tire. After breaking the lug nuts loose, I drove up on a ramp and changed the tire. After that, backed up and with the new tire back on the ground, secured the lug nuts. Good to go in a a relatively short period of time.

If there is a downside to two axles... they pull so smooth even with a flat tire, that you may not know you have a flat. Then the flat overheats, the tread comes off and WHAM! you may get some body damage as the tread flies off and the sidewalls fling around. This very thing happened to my mother and father on their Airstream.

Lucius
__________________

__________________
Lucius and Danielle
1992 29' Excella Classic
1996 GMC Suburban C2500 7.4L
2005 Chevrolet Suburban K2500 8.1L
Got a cooped-up feeling, gotta get out of town, got those Airstream campin' blues...
nvestysly is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Eddie Bauer AS uses Michelin Tires? Secguru Tires 67 05-29-2014 01:33 AM
from Old axles/15" wheels/bias tires to Dexters/16" wheels/LT tires fitzjo1 Axles 8 01-18-2011 07:41 PM
Question about bolting in Dexter axles fitzjo1 Axles 22 12-31-2010 06:54 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.