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Old 08-23-2017, 05:29 PM   #1
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18 degree slope?

Newbie so cautious towing. One access to the world beyond from my house (stored at home) is 1200 foot private road with up to 18 degree downslope. TV is Highlander, AWD, limited, have brake Contoller. Just take slow?
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Old 08-23-2017, 05:39 PM   #2
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What material is the road surface? Hard to render any opinions or guesses without knowing this IMO. How long is the 18% downslope, where is it located within the 1200', and is it curved at any point? Need to know all factors to assess things.

For instance, if the 18% downslope is 300' long, but is in the middle of the 1200' drive, there may be room to run out the rig safely, if things get out of hand. If however, the 18% section is very long, and at the end of the drive, the danger and risk it seems to me is more profound.

Are you sure the trailer brakes work correctly, and do you have driveway room to test them manually before you get to the 18% downslope?

What is the overall elevation drop for the entire driveway? This will help put the 18% downslope in context.

Looking forward to more details.

Thanks,

Peter

PS -- The sources I checked suggest that an 18% grade equates to a slope of 10.2 degrees above the horizontal, if that helps to visualize this FWIW.
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Old 08-23-2017, 05:58 PM   #3
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Forgive me for being obtuse, but an 18 degree slope is different than a 18% grade.
Still pretty radical!
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:00 PM   #4
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First part, 300 ft or so is not as steep, then 45 degree curve to the right and 800 ft starts at 15 then to 18 before flattens at private gate. Steep canyon to the left. Road surface very good, asphalt. It is two lane with wide fire Dept turn out but is at the beginning of steepest part.

Shoot, I think it is not worth trying
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:03 PM   #5
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18 grade. It exceeds county limit and was built as private road for all us in fire zone, gated at both ends (pacific coast highway is cross street). Open during emergencies and fire trucks use it.
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:07 PM   #6
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Not liking the odds, given the part highlighted in red. If you have alternative access, avoid this road IMO.

If you had lots of experience with this exact rig on other challenging roads, it might be worth the risk, but without any room at the bottom for a runaway situation . . . IMO the risks exceed the reward . . .

Good luck!

Peter


Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfish View Post
First part, 300 ft or so is not as steep, then 45 degree curve to the right and 800 ft starts at 15 then to 18 before flattens at private gate. Steep canyon to the left. Road surface very good, asphalt. It is two lane with wide fire Dept turn out but is at the beginning of steepest part.

Shoot, I think it is not worth trying
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Originally Posted by Garfish View Post
18 grade. It exceeds county limit and was built as private road for all us in fire zone, gated at both ends (pacific coast highway is cross street). Open during emergencies and fire trucks use it.
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:20 PM   #7
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18 degrees is dang steep. I certainly would not do it with any Airstream at any size, it just too much. Hope you have an alternative.
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:22 PM   #8
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Thanks for the advice. Will take the longer way.
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Old 08-31-2017, 12:34 PM   #9
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I've got a 300-foot concrete driveway that curves about 30 degrees and has a 15 degree (26%) grade at its steepest. Since my F250 and the trailer are moving at maybe five MPH on the driveway, the rig's brakes easily hold and stop on the grade. I have no problems at all. If I did, I surely wouldn't drive it in the mountains at highway speeds.
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Old 08-31-2017, 01:31 PM   #10
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Grades of 18% and 18 degrees are not same. Ref AS67's comment. Grade % is rise divided by run times 100 to get XX%. A 45 degree hill is a 100% grade. A 50% grade is 22.5 degrees. A 10% grade is 4.5 degrees.

Now, going slow makes a grade much easier than traveling at speed. Assuming this grade is 18% and not 18 degrees, one could likely negotiate with little difficulty, given good brakes and good traction. The gates that need to be opened may be a caution though.

Maybe practice a bit on lesser grades before you consider using this one. Besides, any excuse that lets you travel more is a good one. Pat
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Old 08-31-2017, 01:38 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airstreamer67 View Post
I've got a 300-foot concrete driveway that curves about 30 degrees and has a 15 degree (26%) grade at its steepest. Since my F250 and the trailer are moving at maybe five MPH on the driveway, the rig's brakes easily hold and stop on the grade. I have no problems at all. If I did, I surely wouldn't drive it in the mountains at highway speeds.
In the original post, it was stated that he is a newbie, and apparently has a new rig, which he has never taken down the steep grade, which has a dangerous drop off on the left, and which ends at a gate and busy coastal highway, I believe. [edit yes the Pacific Coast Highway, thus no run out room]

Quite a specific set of parameters which counsel his wise decision not to risk the test run IMO.

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