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Old 07-27-2019, 10:30 AM   #1
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1-7/8 inch crowfoot

attempting to torque my hitch ball it is impossible to get a 1 7/8 inch socket (even the shortest socket i can find) connected to my 3/4 inch torque wrench to fit in the trunnion head space with my hitch ball shank and nut. Has anyone found a 3/4 drive 17/8 crowfoot?
I have a 12000 lb e2 trunnion hitch
a 450 lb tourque wrench
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Old 07-27-2019, 04:44 PM   #2
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17/8 inch crowfoot

I looked at the E2 manual online, nothing detailed for real special tools req’d.

Any chance for a pic or two?

Is it similar to the Equalizer head? I have that one and I use a std socket but a previous socket that I lost reqd a bit of thinning the OD of the nose to get a good bite and I use a 6” extension and breaker bar.

I also have to rotate the trunnions out of the way for access.

Gary
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Old 07-28-2019, 07:36 AM   #3
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This is not a preferred solution, but I have put my air hammer with chisel on a hitch nut to tighten it up. This marked up the nut, but not so much that the correct socket wouldn't later fit it.

And it tightened it down.

Found loose ball upon pre-trip inspection and could not find correct socket in my tools or at local auto parts store.

That ball and nut were retired upon full rectification of the issue, but I would do the same thing again in the same situation. It works at least temporarily. And replacement is cheap.
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Old 07-28-2019, 08:28 AM   #4
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I see the problem. I think.
The E2 trunnion head has a plate under the ball nut for the trunnion support.
However, I can't imagine a crowfoot on a torque wrench would be accurate anyway. I guess I'd shoot for a 1 7/8 box end and a 4' section of pipe over it.
First, I'd remove the bars and flip the shank over in the receiver, so you can assess the problem. Or once you have the wrench, turn the shank 90 degrees so you can push down on the "torque amplifier" (Pipe).
Have you tried putting the socket on the nut and then inserting the wrench?
Sometimes that gains you some clearance.
Or a universal with an extension so the wrench is outside the plate?

I can't imagine you're the first to have this issue. I'd give Fastway a call. Aren't they part of Equalizer?

BTW, This socket looks short.
https://www.amazon.com/Sunex-460-Sta...03&s=hi&sr=1-3
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Old 07-28-2019, 08:38 AM   #5
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From the manual:
Quote:
Hitch balls require a 1-7/8” socket and a torque wrench capable of approximately 450 ft-lbs. torque for installation. Your nearest Fastway e2 dealership will have the tools needed and will usually install the hitch ball for a reasonable fee.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:06 AM   #6
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attached photo showing torque wrench , ball w/shank and e2 hitch. this is why I am looking for a 17/8 crowfoot.

I have been using a pipe wrench and a 4 foot pipe, turn the hitch side ways in the receiver and pull like hell but I have no idea how tight I am getting the nut.

I now did find the 17/8 crowfoot but only in a kit with 7 other wrenches $120.00, a bit much for only needing one of the wrenches
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:35 AM   #7
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I know this isn't the best way to tighten your hitch ball. I notice your ball has the flat sides against the trunnion head. Wedge a bar or something similar into the nut and turn the ball instead. This would probably not be the best idea to leave after tightening - but may be a stopgap help.

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Old 07-28-2019, 09:56 AM   #8
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Insert the hitch into the to vehicle so that the ball is horizontal.

Use a boxed end wrench or pipe wrench, then use something that slips over the wrench handle to extend the length (a pipe) to 4'.

It will require 112.5 lbs of force at the distance of 4' from the center of the bolt to create 450 ft lbs of torque.

(lever length in feet x pounds of force) = foot pounds
or
2' x 225 lbs = 450 ft lbs
3' x 150 lbs = 450 ft lbs

I use my body weight and an extension to approximate (actually I exceed) the required torque when tightening a hitch ball. I have never used a torque wrench to measure. I'm heavy enough to be sure I have surpassed the minimum torque required. I've not had any hitch ball come loose in the 45+ years I've been towing.

ps:
I learned this simple math from a structural engineer when a job specification required me to torque some bolts to a minimum 2,000 ft lbs. (stabilizing a building foundation wall that was collapsing) I used a 10' lever with 200+ lbs (me) hanging on it. That satisfied this engineer's torque test.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:56 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mollysdad View Post
I see the problem. I think.
The E2 trunnion head has a plate under the ball nut for the trunnion support.
However, I can't imagine a crowfoot on a torque wrench would be accurate anyway. I guess I'd shoot for a 1 7/8 box end and a 4' section of pipe over it.
First, I'd remove the bars and flip the shank over in the receiver, so you can assess the problem. Or once you have the wrench, turn the shank 90 degrees so you can push down on the "torque amplifier" (Pipe).
Have you tried putting the socket on the nut and then inserting the wrench?
Sometimes that gains you some clearance.
Or a universal with an extension so the wrench is outside the plate?

I can't imagine you're the first to have this issue. I'd give Fastway a call. Aren't they part of Equalizer?

BTW, This socket looks short.
https://www.amazon.com/Sunex-460-Sta...03&s=hi&sr=1-3
Have you tried putting the socket on the nut and then inserting the wrench?
See photo below , using a 450 lb / 3/4 drive torque wrench their is no room for the socket

I have been using your idea above but with a pipe wrench instead of a box wrench and 4 foot pipe but have no idea how tight I am getting the nut. So purchased the torque wrench to get the nut confirmed it is at 450lbs.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:57 AM   #10
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I vote for a call to E2 Tech Support and ask, OK how do you tighten this?
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:02 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A W Warn View Post
Insert the hitch into the to vehicle so that the ball is horizontal.

Use a boxed end wrench or pipe wrench, then use something that slips over the wrench handle to extend the length (a pipe) to 4'.

It will require 112.5 lbs of force at the distance of 4' from the center of the bolt to create 450 ft lbs of torque.

(length in feet x pounds of force) = foot pounds
or
2' x 225 lbs = 450 ft lbs
3' x 150 lbs = 450 ft lbs

I use my body weight and an extension to approximate (actually I exceed) the required torque when tightening a hitch ball. I have never used a torque wrench to measure. I'm heavy enough to be sure I have surpassed the minimum torque required. I've not had any hitch ball come loose in the 45+ years I've been towing.
Thanks Allen. Been doing the pipe wrench and 4 foot pipe but now with your math 3 foot pipe and apply 150 lbs to get 450 ft pounds. I weigh in at 230 Lbs and if I apply my full weight I should hit well over 450 ft lbs. I do not think it is possible to break the shank with just my weight.

Sure would be nice to use the torque wrench to know just how tight it is but I have several other uses for the wrench so not a total loss on investment.
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:16 AM   #12
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I think what you're looking for is a torque adapter. I found a couple at McMaster Carr that are 1-7/8", but they're 1/2" drive.

https://www.mcmaster.com/torque-wrench-adapters
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Decatur View Post
Thanks Allen. Been doing the pipe wrench and 4 foot pipe but now with your math 3 foot pipe and apply 150 lbs to get 450 ft pounds. I weigh in at 230 Lbs and if I apply my full weight I should hit well over 450 ft lbs. I do not think it is possible to break the shank with just my weight.

Sure would be nice to use the torque wrench to know just how tight it is but I have several other uses for the wrench so not a total loss on investment.
If you think about it, using the lever length multiplied by the force is a more exact measure. This is how a torque wrench would be calibrated.
230 lbs x 3 = 690 ft lbs.= PLENTY tight!
Since retiring I hardly ever use my most of my tools. I only use the torque wrench on lug nuts, where too tight is as bad as too loose.
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:45 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 57Vintage View Post
I think what you're looking for is a torque adapter. I found a couple at McMaster Carr that are 1-7/8", but they're 1/2" drive.

https://www.mcmaster.com/torque-wrench-adapters
Harold & Rebecca, thats it. I have been looking for a crowfoot but the "tight clearence offset" is what I have been looking for. Think the term crowfoot is only used for smaller wrenches/sockets
THANK YOU
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