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Old 05-04-2017, 09:01 AM   #15
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Take a lot of advice with a grain of salt, be practical. Your Airstream has a built-in water pressure regulator, and your freezer will thaw out and food may spoil if you turn off the fridge while traveling in warm weather for a length of time.
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Old 05-04-2017, 10:57 AM   #16
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RV sales are already 12% over what they were this time last year. Get out there before everything is gone .
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:07 AM   #17
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A kneeling pad of some sort. Like those sold for gardening work or the equivalent...

I use a thick rectangular foam piece that began life as a packing material for something. When I'm trying to work on something close to the ground, etc, the pad is MUCH easier on my knobby old knees than the ground, especially if I happen to be wearing shorts.

The pad gets dirty--I keep it in the 'setup box' in the TV...
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:10 AM   #18
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Stay off the interstates, Always good to start our on local roads, takes a little more time but worth the trip.
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:11 AM   #19
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Advice?
Have fun!
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:18 AM   #20
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After a hundred miles or so, check and tighten your lug nuts! 110 lbs. If you don't have a torque wrench, check them with a tire iron. They get loose!
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:33 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojo View Post
FWIW, your Airstream has a water pressure regulator already built into the freshwater connection. ........
cannot believe no other member addressed this previously...
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:38 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Piggy Bank View Post
Welcome to the fun!

.........

Keep a list of places you stay, what campsite number you had, and other "good" campsites you would want to be at at that campground. This makes it easier when making reservations the next time. Google maps/earth is good to look over the campgrounds when choosing a site.

We keep an old-fashioned composition book which we labeled "Captain's Log" - we write down each campground, date, site #, cost, and a brief note about services (e.g., no water at site or this other site #xx would be great next time). We also write the brand/model of camper we were using at the time as a heading for each new page.

Only problem now is the ongoing debate over who's this "Captain" - maybe I'd better move the apostrophe over a bit (Captains').
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:44 AM   #23
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Some campgrounds still require an external inline water pressure regulator even though the trailer has a built in water pressure regulator.
The water pressure regulator has to be replaced periodically.
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:55 AM   #24
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We stay at or under the max speed rating for our trailer tires (in our case it's 65mph - depends on the tires you have).

Water filter - we attach one right at the faucet with a short hose (sometimes these faucets are down in a hole and the filter won't go there). We never got around to hooking up the under-sink filter that came with our 27FB, but I like the outside one anyway - easy to replace. With our old SOB, we learned the hard way to use a filter after we got a campground with very silted water.

Also, we wrap breakables like coffee cups, glasses, etc., with something soft, or place between non-breakables to cushion them. They will dance around in the cabinet when on the road. I also use plastic storage containers to corral canned food and anything hard that I don't want bouncing around a cabinet or drawer.

Also consider a surge protector that will also check if the power connection at a campsite is wired correctly - ours cost about $100 for the 30amp version, but I consider it cheap insurance.
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Old 05-04-2017, 11:57 AM   #25
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Water Pressure Regulator

We recently stayed at a campground in Flagstaff, AZ, and they asked if we had a pressure regulator; we didn't (though I knew about the one in the AS). They loaned us one as they said their water pressure would occasionally go over 100 psi--which could rupture the hose.

So, we've purchased one to place on the hose bib before the hose, if for no other reason than to protect the hose. We haven't been at a site with water yet, but I feel better.

We also use a Camco in-line filter from the water supply; I notice many others do, also.

The x-chocks are amazing--just used them for the first time, and they worked great; very stable, no more creaking when walking around in the AS.

I see you're in Aurora. A great "shakedown" place for you would be Carter Lake, in Larimer County. Most of the sites have electrical hook-ups, but no water (bring your own--we camped there last weekend and the water at the Ranger Station nor the toilets was turned on yet). It's close enough to I-25 and several RV stores if you forget anything (there are two near CH 119, and one further North at Johnson's Corner).

A garden kneeling pad is very helpful for some jobs (like setting up and retracting the stabilizer jacks--for which a cordless drill motor with a 3/4" socket is also very helpful).

Using the propane to keep the fridge cold while towing--well, it's rumored to be illegal in some states (how they would know.?.?.?). The thing is if there is an accident and the propane is not shut off at the tank valve(s), then a ruptured propane line could cause fire/explosion issues. Most of the RV'ers I've talked to seem to use the propane when towing to keep their fridge cold. (We bring the trailer to our home the night before we leave to load up, and hook up to shore power and turn on the fridge with the AC power to cool the fridge/freezer over night. Works great!)

Things WILL move in the AS, if not secured. The shower head will come loose and fall, and possibly break. (We keep dog beds in the shower when the dogs are using them and while towing, and we just unhook the showerhead and put between the beds.) Toiletpaper and paper towels will unravel; haven't figured out how to stop that, except to remove the rolls when towing. We have learned that putting anything on the beds will make then find their way to the floor when towing. We use the space beneath the dinette to store many things and that helps to contain them somewhat.

And, the bit about keeping the stress level low and enjoying yourself--GREAT advice.

Enjoy!
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Old 05-04-2017, 12:42 PM   #26
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We have put together a detailed list of equipment that we may need on various trips. If you would like a copy please email me at: sgraner@aol.com Besides the Newbies book to Airstream (very good), I got the RVing for Dummies Book = funny but really educational. Safe journeys.
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Old 05-04-2017, 12:59 PM   #27
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....and make sure all the doors, drawers and cabinets are CLOSED before taking off, and the outside door is slammed and locked. and bring disposal gloves when handling the toilet hose. First stop, do a walk-around checking hitch, windows and doors. Stay in the middle lane to avoid the ramps and speeders. Keep headlights on in daytime. Remember when turning right, RV wheels will go over the line...same for going left. Store cases of wine and beer on the shower floor. Be nice to the people in the SOB..they're human too. Invite the single older guy in the 20' AS over for drinks around the fire.
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Old 05-04-2017, 01:16 PM   #28
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First trip

Newbie's guide has good checklists.

Don't let someone interrupt you during hitching or unhitching - you're bound to miss a step. If they do, go through all the steps from the beginning to make sure you really did them all.

Take it slow. We thought it was enough to spend 3 or 4 days at each spot. Not really - remember there are everyday things that need to be done regularly just like at home - laundry, shopping, cleaning the trailer, defrosting the fridge, etc. We ran into someone that always stays about a month at each spot before moving on (they always check in at the local senior center - often meals, socializing, meeting locals, regular activities of interest locally). That's probably a bit much for some places, but longer is better, within reason. Particularly when camped near a city or a large national park or birding area that you're visiting, it takes a while to explore, find out the good places, and get to know a place so you'll remember it. You can even read a book.

On your personal checklist - make sure the water pump is off before you tow out from anywhere. If you're one of those that leaves the gas on while traveling (we are not), you will need to leave the 12v electric system in "Use", not "Store" to power the fridge electronics, so the pump will have power. The bouncing on the road can turn on the water at the kitchen faucet and empty your fresh tank into the trailer. If you're lucky, the faucet won't have been shaken so it's no longer pointed over the sink. We weren't lucky.

We travel with the gas and power off - we see it as less chance that the trailer will explode, which could delay your trip for days. That means frozen things thaw out, cold things warm up. The temp on the fridge display of course is the temp of the air, not the contents, which stay a bit colder. The remedy to thawing out on the road is to take it slow and plan your shopping - stay long enough that your freezer is empty before you leave for the next site, or the last frozen thing is for the arrival dinner. If we're moving fast, we'll buy milk by the quart and eggs by the half dozen. The fridge and particularly the freezer is not that big.

If you turn the gas off while traveling, you may forget which tank you were using. I loop a Gear-Tie around one of the handles on the active tank so I know which one to turn on at the next stop, so we don't wind up with both tanks empty. We have a luggage scale to check the tank weight - ours are about 52 lbs full, 22 empty.

Dry camping in the cold - you can't always depend on solar (we only have a 100-watt briefcase folding panel); you need a generator particularly if dry camping in subfreezing temperatures for more than a day or two. You need the furnace to keep the pipes from freezing, and you need a lot of battery for the furnace fan. We carry a very small electric heater so we don't have to use a lot of gas when we're hooked up ($16.00 at Walmart), and a Little Buddy gas heater if we're dry camping - it takes the first 7 hours, runs out of gas, then the furnace comes on for the last 2-3 hours at 45 degrees, recharge when quiet hours end in the morning. Our first time with no generator, we had to run the tow vehicle hooked up in the middle of the night to keep the furnace fan running to prevent the pipes from freezing and the batteries from fully discharging.

Batteries - the stock charger in Airstreams (shame on them) is a single-stage charger and methodically destroys batteries by pushing current into them whether they need it or not. Dry camping in the cold where you're discharging and recharging quite a bit is probably the riskiest - check your batteries weekly or more often and refill with distilled water as needed. Otherwise check every couple of weeks or monthly. It's only $400 or so to replace them, but every $400 counts to us.

Tires - a TPMS can save you a lot of grief, can warn you before a blowout.

Mileage - we save a lot of gas - and nerves - going 55 rather than 65 (the limit for our standard trailer tires) or faster (like the GPS assumes you're going on those long, straight highways on the prairies).

Enjoy it all!
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