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Old 06-23-2017, 02:42 PM   #15
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No choice at all. Ford. Best selling and best made pick up in the US.
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Old 06-23-2017, 02:59 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by jrotino View Post
Hello-
I am new to the Forum, so would like to get some general advice.

Dreaming about Airstreams for the past 10 years, and the time to buy is here.

Planning on a Flying Cloud M25.

Potential truck choices at Toyota Tundra, Ford F-150, or Chevy Silverado.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,
Joe
F-150 Eco boost with heavy duty tow package. It will come with a 36 gal tank and a payload over 1500 lbs. A great truck to drive solo or towing , will handle your 25' AS with ease.
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Old 06-23-2017, 03:03 PM   #17
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We love our Tundra, but thinking any of those mentioned would do a great job towing. I would recommend searching for a used low mileage one to save some ��!
We lucked into ours---had<20K miles & was just turned in from a guy that leased a new one every 2 years!
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Old 06-23-2017, 03:23 PM   #18
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Ginger or Mary Ann?
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Old 06-23-2017, 03:24 PM   #19
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Definitely Mary Ann. I couldn't afford Ginger.
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Old 06-23-2017, 03:41 PM   #20
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I am sure all those equipped properly would do well. Since mine is an everyday driver I went from F250 diesel to a Tundra and love it. Just did cross country with 31 classic and all good. It now has 110k and is just as tight and runs just as well as 100k ago. The longer you have a good truck ...any make...the better you appreciate it. Tundra is mighty fine. Good luck...good camping!
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Old 06-23-2017, 04:00 PM   #21
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GM, Ford, Ram, Toyota, and Nissan all make very good trucks, and properly configured, they should all be able to pull your trailer. You have to pick one based on your requirements. My primary requirements are reliability, resale value, and safety (I don't care so much about having the latest technology in my vehicles), hence, if I were buying a truck, it would be Tundra (Silverado/Sierra 1500 with 6.2 V8, 8 speed auto, and max payload package would be my second choice). My suggestion is to test drive them all -- That may eliminate some of them from consideration. Good luck!
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Old 06-23-2017, 04:46 PM   #22
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Started our Airstream experience with my existing 2007 Mercedes ML320 CDI 3.0L V6 turbo-diesel and a brand new 2013 25FB International Serenity coupled by a Hensley Arrow weight distribution hitch. The literature tongue weight of 833 pounds was 1,150 pounds on the dealer lot after full propane tanks, full fresh water tank, the Hensley Arrow hitch head and a brief case.

Since the California posted 55 mph for towing worked well, I continued at that speed up the mountain grade on I-10 out of Palm Springs in 4th gear and 3,100 rpm. After getting the rig to the Phoenix area, we loaded the trailer with "everything" and the wife and I drove to the CAT scales (found at truck stops). The trailer scaled 6,900 pounds with 1,175 pounds of tongue weight. The drive train was not as happy with the loaded trailer.

A 2012 Ram 2500HD 4x4 short bed crew cab was acquired. All towing issues resolved and we could take anything we desired.

The 25FB was traded in for a 2014 31' Classic with a ProPride hitch (second generation Hensley design). Our initial conversion to four Lifeline 6Vdc 300 amp-hour batteries that help create a 1,375 pound tongue weight was improved by the use of a single 600 amp hour lithium battery and the tongue weigh dropped to 1,175 pounds. (the truck's 1,200 pound hitch was cut off and replaced with one rated 2,550 pounds of tonque weight and a 17,000 pound trailer. The rig fully loaded scales 19,200 pounds and all the numbers are known for each tire load so all is well.

We added a 2015 23D International Serenity and re-used the Hensley Arrow hitch and the Mercedes. At 962 pounds of tongue weight and a total weight of 6,068 pounds, this is a great match for the Mercedes. We drive 55 mph with this rig and there is enough engine brake action in second gear at 35 mph going down mountain that neither the trailer nor the Mercedes brakes are applied.

While the truck lets us take whatever comes to mind, the Mercedes is weight constrained to one 2,000 watt generator (propane converted Honda 2000) that can run the single air conditioner due to the hybrid Magnum MSH-3012 converter that can get battery power to help start the A/C as it cycles when off grid. We have a very light Solaire grill that gets propane from the trailer (as does the generator), a Vivair 12Vdc air compressor, two ZipDee chairs with matching waning fabric, and some basic tools in the back of the car.

One has to do lots of home work to enter the Airstream experience with the fewest possible mistakes. Logically one would spends lots of time at a large dealership where there is a comprehensive inventory to allow for good familiarization of the various floor plans. Reading the specific model treads on this forum will give insight to other's experiences with a given model. Then determine real world tongue weights and actual loaded for camping weights and decide if flat lands are your only driving possibilities or are the mountains in the future as well.

Knowing some real tongue weight numbers, the weights of the driver and all passengers and all the stuff to be carried in the tow vehicle will give great guidance on initially weeding out possible tow vehicle selections with inadequate payload capability and or combined weight capability (loaded truck plus loaded trailer).

Doing the home work is all part of the fun!
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Old 06-23-2017, 04:54 PM   #23
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2017 25' Flying Cloud
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Ford. All other brands won't tow an AS.

Stuart

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrotino View Post
Hello-
I am new to the Forum, so would like to get some general advice.

Dreaming about Airstreams for the past 10 years, and the time to buy is here.

Planning on a Flying Cloud M25.

Potential truck choices at Toyota Tundra, Ford F-150, or Chevy Silverado.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,
Joe
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Old 06-23-2017, 04:56 PM   #24
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People tell you to read the sub forums and that's true.
However, you need to know what to look for.
The TV has two ratings that matter: towing capacity and payload capacity.
Odds are great whatever you buy will exceed the towing (pulling) capacity.
Odds are also great that you will not have enough payload (gravity resisting) capacity
The payload is where you get into trouble.
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Old 06-23-2017, 05:54 PM   #25
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Ford, Chevy, GMC or Dodge in 3/4 ton diesel. go 4x4 if you will travel in snow or off-road. Despite what half-ton dealers will say, the tow vehicle weight to trailer weight must be considered. Diesels come with electric "jake brakes" either standard or as an option. The "tow-haul" transmissions available make towing safer. That said, I am in Arizona and go from 1400' to 7500' in elevation (and back) often. Less truck would make me a rolling road block and that is not a good feeling. Towing with a vehicle whose ability is at the margin may not be a good choice.
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Old 06-23-2017, 06:41 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirstreamCSH View Post
People tell you to read the sub forums and that's true.
However, you need to know what to look for.
The TV has two ratings that matter: towing capacity and payload capacity.
Odds are great whatever you buy will exceed the towing (pulling) capacity.
Odds are also great that you will not have enough payload (gravity resisting) capacity
The payload is where you get into trouble.
Bingo. And make sure you are looking at the correct capacities. A truck advertised with x payload will be single cab. The crew cabs most actually buy will have less. And that y tow rating will be for a specific gearing. Just as an example, my old 2012 f150 had 7,700 lb tow limit with its 3.55 gears. Had I purchase 3.73 gears the limit would have been around 9,000 or so. Or more.

Btw, just buy a gas F250 and call it a day. I just did 2 weeks ago!
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Old 06-23-2017, 08:31 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by SCOTTinNJ View Post
Bingo. And make sure you are looking at the correct capacities. A truck advertised with x payload will be single cab. The crew cabs most actually buy will have less. And that y tow rating will be for a specific gearing. Just as an example, my old 2012 f150 had 7,700 lb tow limit with its 3.55 gears. Had I purchase 3.73 gears the limit would have been around 9,000 or so. Or more.

Btw, just buy a gas F250 and call it a day. I just did 2 weeks ago!
Congrats! Thats a very nice truck. Just curious, how much payload did you get with that?
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Old 06-23-2017, 10:53 PM   #28
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2012 25' Flying Cloud
Battle Lake , Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrotino View Post
Hello-
I am new to the Forum, so would like to get some general advice.

Dreaming about Airstreams for the past 10 years, and the time to buy is here.

Planning on a Flying Cloud M25.

Potential truck choices at Toyota Tundra, Ford F-150, or Chevy Silverado.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,
Joe
A modern half-ton truck offers about 400 ft lbs of torque, disc brakes all around, and plenty of axle load capacity for a 25' Airstream and reasonable load. An excellent match. We have had several and traveled the country extensively with ours for years. The reason everyone favors their own brand is because they all are good.

Fully one-third of a successful towing combination is a quality, properly set up weight distribution hitch. We've had several of them and found the Hensley/ProPride design is ideal for this size towing combination.

What's missing in your question is how many people and pets will travel with you, what you plan to carry in the truck's bed, and how you will use the pickup when not towing. Half and three-quarter ton pickups have their load limits, long wheelbase pickups can be miserable daily driving around town.

A favorite, most economical to purchase and operate truck for us was a 2012 Ram 1500 Regular Cab 5.7 Hemi, 120" wheelbase, full coil spring suspension. No back seat, a truck for two, but had a large bed for hauling, nice soft ride, and real easy to drive around town. New MSRP of $32K, purchased for $24K. After 50K miles and 4 years given $20K trade-in allowance. Plenty of power and braking, decent gas mileage, and perfect stability towing our FC 25 with a Hensley/ProPride hitch.
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