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Old 09-25-2012, 03:44 PM   #1
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Need Advice- Bee Hive Removal

All,

All takers welcome...I need some advice humanely removing a bee hive from my '67 Ambassador. I have 2 'approved' hives on my property so I have the bee part all set but not the 'best way to remove' part.

The bees are right under the water tank up front..the streamer is not being lived in at the moment but stores stuff.

I think i've decided that removing the under belly is the way to go...but have no earthly idea if I (alone) can accomplish extracting rivets, removing the underbelly etc..... I dont even know what size drill bit to use....so if there are any kindly words of advice I'd appreciate it.

I dont think the hive is to big to manage, but I really wont know until I open her up and see whats what...


Also what would I do after I extract the bees, comb and etc. Can anyone suggest a way to shore up the Airstream underbelly.


I have thought of just plugging up the hole and letting them die, but I just can't.. it's truly against my nature to do so....remember no bees, no food.


thanks in advance..

Ali


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Old 09-25-2012, 04:15 PM   #2
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Hi hardcherry,

I'd remove the belly skin and go at the cut out from underneath. This will be crowded work but if they're under the floor it is likely your best option. Raising the front of the trailer will help with access. You could try a trap out but I seriously doubt you would get the queen and nurse bees to come off the brood. Removing the belly isn't hard. You can shear off the rivet heads using a stiff scraper and a hammer, or you can simply drill them out.

Drop the skins then cut the comb out and wire it up in frames. Place them in a brood box making sure you get the queen. Then I’d place the brood box under the front edge of the trailer so the foraging bees can find the new colony location. This time of year they’re not likely to swarm, and they’ll stay with the queen. When you get an unusually warm winter day you can re-install the belly skin using new rivets. Bee sure to seal up the hole so you don't catch a new swarm next spring.


You're in AHB country...how is their temperament?
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Old 09-25-2012, 04:39 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hardcherry View Post
...I have thought of just plugging up the hole and letting them die, but I just can't.. it's truly against my nature to do so....remember no bees, no food...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin245 View Post
...You could try a trap out but I seriously doubt you would get the queen and nurse bees to come off the brood.


Another thing to consider with either of these scenarios is that unless you remove the comb you will likely end up with a pest problem. Small hive beetles and wax moths love protein and brood comb. You’ll likely end up with slimed comb and fermented honey dripping from the trailer. I'd do a cut out.

I have two to do here. One involves removing brick from a bricked in window at an old industrial plant, and the other is in a home where honey is dripping from the light fixture.
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Old 09-27-2012, 12:32 PM   #4
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Thanks Kevin.....great advice.

I'm going to build a bee-Vac this week...

I'm pretty sure the queen is a flyaway from when I split my hive this
Spring and therefore not aggressive

I'll let you know how it goes- I may try and Integrate the hive
With the spring split as I have plenty of empty frames

Best
Ali
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Old 09-27-2012, 12:41 PM   #5
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I am deathly allergic to bees and wasp so would not attempt this at all. I would call a professional. At least for advice if I was willing to try it myself:
Beehive Removal | Bee Swarm Removal | Beekeeper List#
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