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Old 07-31-2004, 12:39 PM   #1
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Gas Plumbing Questions

I'm re-building a gutted-out 58 Airstream and I'm to the point of plumbing in the gas lines from the tanks to to the applliances ( Refrigerator, stove, water heater and furnace ). What type of pipe should I use? Somebody sugested using black iron pipe under the trailer and thru the floor and then running a "flex appliance hose" to each appliance. Is this a good method or should I run copper lines and what "TYPE" ( K or L ) should I use? Does copper get eaten up propane gas?
Thanks and I hope somebody can help. It's my first Airstream and I'm loving every part of building it from the ground up.
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Old 07-31-2004, 05:33 PM   #2
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The black pipe will be more durable than the copper, but it will also weigh a little more. IMHO - The difference in weight wouldn't be of any concern since we are only talking about an added 20 pounds or so. Plus the weight is not in a single spot since it is distributed over the length of the trailer.
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Old 07-31-2004, 06:40 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aztlanco
...Somebody sugested using black iron pipe under the trailer and thru the floor and then running a "flex appliance hose" to each appliance. Is this a good method or should I run copper lines and what "TYPE" ( K or L ) should I use? Does copper get eaten up propane gas?...
Balck iron pipe is well up to the task, but is much more difficult to support than copper.

"Flex appliance hoses", by [my local] code, can not be run through walls or floors.

Propane & Natural Gas do not attack copper. However, years ago, the bad smell added to both gases would, in some locales, attack the copper & cause a flaky rust inside the pipe. These flakes would fall off and clog jets. At the time, tin-lined copper pipe was made available to keep this from happening.

I think this problem was resolved since I have never been able to locate tin-lined copper pipe, and I have looked in two states.

I forget the differences between K & L pipe, but it deals with wall thickness. I believe either will work for you, but hopefully another member will chime in with a more definitive recommendation.

Tom
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Old 07-31-2004, 08:32 PM   #4
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For best flared joints, get a double flaring tool and use it on all flares. The slight extra work will make for a much better, stronger, flare.
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Old 08-01-2004, 07:04 AM   #5
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Type M is thin, L is medium, and K is thicker walled. In England they run gas in copper in the homes, have special connectors if I remember right. I would think it easier to work with if you are experienced with soildering. The K you need to get at someplace other than Home Depot.
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Old 08-01-2004, 01:22 PM   #6
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Thanks guys, I knew I'd come to the right place for answers.
Ernie
18ft. "traveler"
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Old 08-01-2004, 07:02 PM   #7
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The more I think about it, the more I dislike the idea of using black iron pipe in an RV. I don't think you will be ever able to secure it well enough to keep it in place. Potholes, washboard roads, railroad tracks, and all the other bumps in the road will put considerable g-force loading on the relatively large mass of the pipe. The consequences of it breaking away from its mounts and cracking open somewhere would be dire.

Copper pipe, on the other hand, has rather low mass and will be little affected by everyday jolts.

I have never seen sweated copper gas lines - only flair fittings. Surely sweated fittings cannot be permitted on gas lines, can they?

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Old 08-01-2004, 07:51 PM   #8
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gas lines

Quote:
Originally Posted by aztlanco
I'm re-building a gutted-out 58 Airstream and I'm to the point of plumbing in the gas lines from the tanks to to the applliances ( Refrigerator, stove, water heater and furnace ). What type of pipe should I use? Somebody sugested using black iron pipe under the trailer and thru the floor and then running a "flex appliance hose" to each appliance. Is this a good method or should I run copper lines and what "TYPE" ( K or L ) should I use? Does copper get eaten up propane gas?
Thanks and I hope somebody can help. It's my first Airstream and I'm loving every part of building it from the ground up.
gastite , check out gastite at your local plumbing supply house
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Old 08-01-2004, 07:58 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j54mark
...I have never seen sweated copper gas lines - only flair fittings. Surely sweated fittings cannot be permitted on gas lines, can they?
I'm with you. It would be a lot easier to sweat-solder the joints, but I have NEVER seen an example in a professional installation.

Unless someone wants to point out the rule allowing the use of soldered joints, I think it is best to say that copper, when used in propane gas installations, should be joined with either flared or compression couplings. Preferably flared.

Tom
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Old 08-02-2004, 07:24 PM   #10
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Thanks again guys,
I think I will go with the copper pipe and flared joints. I think copper is more flexible and giving when it comes time to traveling on the mountain roads where the chassis will flex and stress. How about aircraft hose hangers for support? You guys stick arround because I will definetly will have more questions in the future as I'm far from being finished.
Ernie, 58' Traveler (18 ft.)
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Old 08-02-2004, 07:36 PM   #11
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Sweated lines=big boom when repair time comes.

John
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Old 08-02-2004, 10:23 PM   #12
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Our '04 has copper. Don't know what thickness though.
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Old 08-30-2004, 01:02 AM   #13
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Copper pipe infor source

If you guys go to copper.org and click on the fuel gas section it will give you more information about joining pipes, flared fittings and fuel gas in copper piping. See if it answers your questions in a more definitive manner. All I know is that I don't know nothin'.
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Old 08-30-2004, 06:33 AM   #14
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gastite

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If you guys go to copper.org and click on the fuel gas section it will give you more information about joining pipes, flared fittings and fuel gas in copper piping. See if it answers your questions in a more definitive manner. All I know is that I don't know nothin'.
please check out the product gastite thanks
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