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Old 11-02-2006, 08:52 AM   #1
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TT or MH?

Which is easiest to drive, a 30 ft Airstream MH or a Suburban pulling a 28 ft Airstream?

My husband truly wants a MH because he thinks it is easier to use, drive, etc than towing a trailer. He likes the "all in one". (No "hitch-up).

I really want a tt. Both tt or mh would be Airstream.

We have had mhs, from Bs to 34ft, (all SOB) but have never towed a tt. We have towed boats and U-halls, etc.

We usually have no problems agreeing on everything, but this time we need help with our decision.

Thanks.
Pat
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Old 11-02-2006, 09:26 AM   #2
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There is no correct answer, but there are several factors beside ease of driving vs. towing. I’m sure you’ll get all kinds of opinions off this forum.

Try this approach: Identify all the major & minor factors, likes & dislikes, advantages & disadvantages, consider your individual wants vs. must have needs. Perhaps after compiling and evaluating a comprehensive list you will come to an agreeable compromise.
Good Luck
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Old 11-02-2006, 09:36 AM   #3
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Hello Pat -- I wouldn't presume that "The Answer" is going to come out of this discussion. Airstream quality is in the average range for the RV industry, so whether you want the aluminum Airstream look or just the Airstream name on a slab-sided moho is a decision to make. See http://www.airstreammotorhomes.com/ -- Airstream branded Mohos certainly come in both flavors.

One factor for me is mobility once arrived at our destination -- use the TV if pulling a TT vs. pull a toad if in a MH. One less engine to maintain (ie, "no" to the MH option) is a factor for me, but not enough to argue over with a MH owner.

I appreciate a moderate size TT that is large enough for convenience features and small enough to fit into some restrictive public park or national forest campsites. With a 25' TT I can camp in high season with more campsites open to me. We have usually been able to reserve a site on short notice with these choices being open. wheelinterested's Classic 27' FB Limited tweaks my curiousity but I'll stick with my choice.
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Old 11-02-2006, 10:16 AM   #4
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I think you provided your own answer: " We have had mhs, from Bs to 34ft, (all SOB) but have never towed a tt."

This is not a rational, fact based, decision issue. It is a personal style and preference emotional issue.

A MH can weigh twice as much as a trailer rig which means a whole lot more 'stuff' you can take with you. It is an entirely different experience when going down the road and when setting up camp.

I notice that some folks migrate from TT to MH as they get older and less able to deal with hitchups and seek more 'civilized' camping. I don't see many going from MH to TT. So your going to a TT would be a big adventure and full of risk for you I think. That might be fun but do keep in mind that it would be quite a change that you might not like to stick with if you do it.
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Old 11-02-2006, 12:10 PM   #5
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Let's see if I can post the pros and cons of both here.
MoHo pros:
Easier to drive and set up
convenient for using facilities while traveling (you can make a sandwich and use the toilet while driving)
you can take more "stuff" with you
you can use the generator to boondock, or camp in a parking lot enroute.
MoHo cons:
License and registration higher
must be insured (at higher cost)
another running gear to keep up and maintain, and things like tires are more expensive (and there are more of them)
You would need a vehicle to tow behind (toad) so you don't have to break camp to go sightseeing
more likely to be broken into while stored

TT Pros:
can be dropped off and use the tow vehicle for sightseeing
generally lighter, and easier to maintain with less mechanicals
less steps to climb to enter (important if you have bad knees, ask me how I know)
cheaper to register, and insurance is less costly
TT cons:
have to be hitched/unhitched when you get where you are going
can be a pain to manuever and back into parking spot
you can carry less "stuff"
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Old 11-02-2006, 12:16 PM   #6
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I think an important consideration is how much you plan to travel vs camp. We have put over 42,000 miles on our 1984 310 Limited. If you plan to travel alot the MH is certainly less trouble. I have put a lot of effort and $ into the front end of our rig. At this point I would much rather drive (and feel safer in) the MH than I would our Yukon XL with a heavy trailer.

But if you plan to drive a short distance and then camp for a while (as to opposed to usually staying only a day or two) the TT might be better. Also the drive train on the MH needs to be used to remain reliable so how often you will use it matters too.
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Old 11-02-2006, 03:17 PM   #7
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We went from the TT to MH and never looked back. I pull into a campsite and am off hiking in less than 30 minutes. When we are driving we can stop at a truck stop sleep and never have to get out for the night. My wife can roam and amuse herself while I drive. As for the extra drive train it is true but I do not have to use a tow vehicle for an around town car when I get home from camping.
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Old 11-02-2006, 03:25 PM   #8
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A big problem with a larger, more comfortable TT is having enough TV to pull it. When not traveling folks may not like having to tool around town in a 3/4-ton.
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Old 11-02-2006, 03:56 PM   #9
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Overlander63 ...

"convenient for using facilities while traveling (you can make a sandwich and use the toilet while driving)"

Now THAT'S impressive!!

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Old 11-02-2006, 04:35 PM   #10
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How about comfort control? Does a motorhome stay warmer in cold weather and cooler in hot weather while on the road? I don't know about MH but the trailer is hot or cold after driving in temperature extremes. Is it a better transport for pets? I think sitting up high and those giant windows and plush seating would be the ultimate in travel comfort. You wouldn't have to worry about towing or road conditions as much without a heavy trailer behind you?

I would love to try camping in a motorhome (a small one) We do like to use our TV to go many places you might not be able to take a trailer or motorhome, so we would have to hookup a car behind. We also like to leave the campsite separately at times, I wouldn't want to have to be moved from being settled when hubby decides he wants to explore a different area in the morning. I am not sure if not having to stop at a rest area is a good thing. I like taking the break and we have to get the dogs out too anyway.
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Old 11-03-2006, 10:32 AM   #11
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I think that many good points were made in favor of the MH.

We looked at a 2000 gas LY yesterday. I sat in the driver's seat and did feel quite comfortable. The A (SOB) we had some years ago, was not as good for me. I did not feel comfortable when driving, so I didn't drive. The setup in the LY seemed better for driving. Not very different than our Suburban.

If we decide to get serious about the LY, we well both drive it then. If it had twin beds, I would definately want it.

I still would like to have a tt, up to 28', but would be happy with the mh too.

Thanks everyone!

Pat
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Old 11-03-2006, 12:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbradhstream
Overlander63 ...

"convenient for using facilities while traveling (you can make a sandwich and use the toilet while driving)"

Now THAT'S impressive!!

BH

You know, I was thinking the same thing. People here are so talented. But I would worry about eating that sandwich. I think I would make my own!
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Old 11-03-2006, 01:42 PM   #13
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In all seriousness, it was always a travel trailer for us. I think the classic motorhomes are truely beautiful and if we had decided on a motorhome instead, I would have definately wanted one. I always thought an older Classic would have been what I wanted; however, I recently saw a mid-90's Classic and I must say that is the body style that I would have probably aspired to since Airstream decided to can the new Classic. I really like the more contemporary lines of the New Classic and the mid-90's harken to that design.

Having said that, I'm really pleased with our decision. We have the tow vehicle available for excursions from our camp sites anytime we are camped. We also visit Walt Disney World frequently and we forsee camping at Ft. Wilderness a LOT. At Ft. Wilderness you can rent a golf cart or bring your own to use to travel around the camp ground (the camp ground IS that big) and we purchased one after our first visit and took it with us a couple of weeks ago on our second visit. With a 3/4 ton tow vehicle we were able to tow our 30' Safari and "tote" our 1,000 lb golf cart in the bed of the truck without breaking a sweat. We didn't crank the truck except to position it for loading and unloading the golf cart and hooking and unhooking the trailer on this trip, but we will have it available on future trips when we have the golf cart and want to visit non-Disney attractions in the area. With a motorhome, we would have had to go with a small toad and leave the golf cart at home or leave the toad at home and tow a small trailer with the golf cart. This way we have all three: accomodations, street vehicle for excursions, and golf cart for in camp ground transportation.

Granted, most of the time the golf cart will stay at home when we aren't traveling to Ft. Wilderness, but we can haul other camping gear in the bed of the truck on those trips like plenty of fire wood, bi-cycles, etc.
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Old 11-03-2006, 02:01 PM   #14
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One way or the other...
He will end up towing something..
Either a TT or a boat.
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