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Old 12-21-2006, 09:37 PM   #15
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During WW II my dad was a private with the Army's 10th Mountain Infantry Ski Patrol and was involved in the invasion of Northern Italy.

I don't think he cared much for war, as he never really talked about his service.

I know he did not want my 2 brothers or I to go to Viet Nam.

Bless him.
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Old 12-21-2006, 10:18 PM   #16
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Pilot

My Dad was a B-24 Liberator pilot also. He never went overseas, but spent all his time training new B-24 pilots and gunners. This was done primarily in Texas and Georgia.

Dad is 85 now and still alive and kickin' . He and my Mom still live at their home in Maryland and keep active. I only hope I can do so good.

Here is Dad's honoree page...
World War II Honoree

If anyone is intersted in honoring a WWII loved one through the National Registry, this is the link..
National WWII Memorial
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Old 12-21-2006, 10:18 PM   #17
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Lynn, contact your congressman/woman. He/she can tell you how to replace those medals for your dad (for free, I might add).

Jim
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Old 12-22-2006, 12:10 AM   #18
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My Father just passed away in August, he was a Marine who participated in the capture of Guadalcanal August 7, 1942 to December 15, 1942; New Guinea September 1943 to December 1943; Cape Gloucester, New Britian, December 1943 to March 1944; Peleliu, Palau Islands, September 15 to October 10, 1944. He never spoke of his experiences during the war until the day before he died. He was a kind, amazing man from a generation full of brave, selfless people. I miss him, and have the deepest respect for all who like him answer the call to defend our country and bring freedom to those in need.
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Old 12-22-2006, 05:25 AM   #19
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We're on our way from SC to WV to visit Julie's Dad for Christmas. He was a young doctor/paratrooper and jumped on Corrigador. When he jumped on the rock he wore more gear than what he weighed. The wind blew so hard that all he could do was let the shute drag him until it caught on something. He knew he'd tear up his hands if he tried to grab something to stop. His hands were what saved many a young soldier. He finished his stint over there as the regimental surgeon. BTW Dr. Hovis turned 89 this year and is still going strong.
My step father served as a rifleman/private with the Winipeg Rifles. He has told few stories of his time in the Netherlands and Belgium. We get to visit him in Canada the day after Christmas.
My father is only 18 years older than I, he was too young to serve in WW2.
We live in the free world with luxuries we take for granted. Without the sacrifices the men and women of this time made our world would doubless be different.
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Old 12-22-2006, 05:43 AM   #20
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Semper Fi to all the Marines. I served in the USMC - tried to follow my Dad's example and go into the USAF but they wouldn't take me with a history of asthma so off to the Marines I went - Parris Island vacation with the sand fleas in August, Camp Pendleton in December (it snowed) and off to Vietnam (Battle of Khe Sanh).
From my perspective, I understand why many of our parents and grandparents that went to war didn't talk about their experiences much except when they were around other veterans and got to comparing notes. I understand that what they experienced for the most part was ugly business. It is the human interest and inspirational stories that I find most special.

My mother passed away a year and a half ago and I came across my father's diary that he kept while he was overeas. That has given me more insight in terms of who he was as a person facing the adversity of war.

My salute to those that served and are serving our country at home and abroad.

Ironically, I never wanted to fly but our son is currently a pilot with the USCG - his life long dream. (Semper Peratus)

We wish all of our service men and women all over the world a Merry Christmas and a huge debt of gratitude for their willingness to serve. Our hearts are with you and we pray for your safe return.

Mac and Linda
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Old 12-22-2006, 09:03 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim & Susan
Lynn, contact your congressman/woman. He/she can tell you how to replace those medals for your dad (for free, I might add).
Jim
Good idea. Our representative, Tom Udall, is really good on veterans' affairs, so he may be just the one.

Lynn
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Old 12-22-2006, 09:25 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roscinante
It always pissed me off (pardon my French) that my dad died at age 85 having served in WWII, Korea, and VietNam and couldn't even get an "honor" guard at his funeral.
Thats too bad. As a former military bandsman, that was part of our job. The trumpet players all had a rotating "on-call" status, and if a call came in from *any* vet, they'd be sent to do the job. They'd drive quite a distance, too, sometimes taking a couple of day's worth of time to do a 2 minute performance.
But since there were so many from the wwII era, and so few active-duty now, since the end of the cold war, they must just not have the resources anymore. I've heard horror stories of mechanical bugles and tape-recorded taps being used ...sacrilege, imo.
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Old 12-22-2006, 10:16 AM   #23
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And for the other side of the coin:

Jim's father had his whole life ahead of him in '38. We have this amazing picture of him with a suit on and riding his new motorcycle somewhere in Germany. He like many other men his age were drafted into the German army. The last thing on their minds was fighting a war; they had just endured a terrible economic depression and were enjoying Germany's new economy.

After being drafted he was eventually sent to Russia. He was captured and sent to the Gulag where he somehow survived the rest of the war. Living in deplorable conditions, doing hard labor with little clothing and felt boots, he made a pact with a gentleman he met there. They discovered they were from the same town and in fact lived only a block from each other. They decided if one of them made it out, they would go back to the other's family and let them know they died an honorable death.

Jim's father made it out and went to this man's home. A young girl in her teens answered the door and was scared of the very thin man who was standing there. Jim's father took it upon himself to help this family through the tough economic years that followed in Hamburg. (Hamburg was almost destroyed by allied bombings) That young girl eventually fell in love with Jim's father and they were married. Later they moved to the United States.

Kathleen
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Old 12-22-2006, 01:02 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by chuck
Thats too bad. As a former military bandsman, that was part of our job. The trumpet players all had a rotating "on-call" status, and if a call came in from *any* vet, they'd be sent to do the job. They'd drive quite a distance, too, sometimes taking a couple of day's worth of time to do a 2 minute performance.
But since there were so many from the wwII era, and so few active-duty now, since the end of the cold war, they must just not have the resources anymore. I've heard horror stories of mechanical bugles and tape-recorded taps being used ...sacrilege, imo.
A CD was used to play "taps" for both my father's memorial service, and my brother-in-law's service. I tried to get something a little more, umm, personal for either of them, and was told that with the number of veterans dying every day, they were unable to provide anything else, unless you were a full-bird colonel or 4 stripe captain, or higher, in rank.
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Old 12-22-2006, 01:25 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by overlander63
A CD was used to play "taps" for both my father's memorial service, and my brother-in-law's service. I tried to get something a little more, umm, personal for either of them, and was told that with the number of veterans dying every day, they were unable to provide anything else, unless you were a full-bird colonel or 4 stripe captain, or higher, in rank.
and a mere bugler doesn't even "rate" a bugler... how ironic is that??
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Old 12-22-2006, 01:57 PM   #26
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My Two Heroes

I have two heros, my dad and his brother, my Uncle Clarence. Only a year apart (1925 and 1926), they had a rough life during the Depression when their Ol' Man abandoned the family of a mother and 5 kids. Dad being the oldest, had to keep up with school and work part time jobs to help the family survive.

When WWII arrived, he enlisted in the Army after high school in 1943. He was selected for the Army Air Corps and became a flight engineer on a B-24. He was sent to India where he flew cargo over the "Hump" (Himalyas) into China. He had several close calls with the mountains, bad weather and Jap Zeroes. Their C-87 cargo and C-109 tanker versions of the B-24 were unarmed. They painted broomsticks black to convince the Japs that they were armed. He survived the war with a Distiquished Flying Cross and an Airmans Medal, as well as all the Campaign medals. He is alive today, and we're going to see him and Mom on Christmas Eve.

My Uncle Clarence enlisted in the Marines. He fought on Iwo Jima with the 4th Marine Division in the "Meatgrinder" with the 3rd and 5th Divisions on each flank. I once asked him if he had killed any Jap soldiers. He smiled and said "I don't know if I killed any, but I sure as Hell shot at alot of them" He was wounded in the eye from grenade shrapnel and lost his sight in that eye. He never was awarded a Purple Heart. That pisses me off! I think his records burned in the St. Louis fire. Uncle Clarence died of lung cancer on July 4, 1990. He was a smoker.

Both men did what they had to do. Times were tough. but they kept going and carved out a safe and comfortable life for themselves and their families.

For that, I'm very very grateful!
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Old 12-22-2006, 02:33 PM   #27
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My dad was 19 when he went to England in 43. He was in the Army infantry and right in the middle of the D-Day, landing in Normandy. Spent a long time marching and crawling to Germany, ended up in Berlin.
Had some great stories to tell, including one where he and his partner were "guarding" a silo at night in bitter cold. They had only a small oil lamp. The other guy left to get some hot chocolate drink mix and when he came back my dad had fallen asleep, kicked over the lamp, and the silo was on fire. Nice mess. They did not get in any trouble over that as there was much more to worry about then whatever was lost in that silo.... they laughed about it when they told the story after getting together for the first time in 50 years.
The family has some Nazi memorabilia that he got off of his kills...a luger, bayonet, sheath knife, uniform items and other things. He passed almost 10 years ago, not long after attending the last of his WW2 soldier reunions with all the guys from his unit.
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Old 12-22-2006, 04:14 PM   #28
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Dad graduated UT School of Pharmacy '32 so being single and with a skill he joined Army Air Corp to avoid the draft "ha-ha". found himself island hopping with the Air Corp till the end of Pacific campagin. Because of his scientific ability and his Tennessee roots he and some of the other guys in the Medical Staff had a still in the jungle at the end of the runway. Toyoko Rose reported hitting a fuel dump when they bombed the still. Co said "no more boys". Never talked about it much but teared up watching MASH everytime.
Mom Lost her first husband 14 days after D-Day in France. He was 34 when drafted. In his last letter he wrote that his hair turned snowwhite crossing the Channel. Yes Tom They are the Greatest Generation.
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