Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-17-2003, 10:08 PM   #1
4 Rivet Member
 
zduke4x's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 258
Images: 3
kayaks

I have 2 kayaks, one 14'9" double and one 9' single. The single I can get inside my 310 but not the longer one.

Has anyone found racks or a method to transport their Kayak type crafts? They will go on a toad when I start using one but on most weekend I just take a bike.

thanks...jem
__________________

__________________
The Silver Buffalo
Saturn with Blue OX towbar
WBCCI # 14067
zduke4x is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 04:02 AM   #2
New Member
 
anhedonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 1
Hey Jem,

You may want to consider a folding kayak...I keep a 15 foot Klepper Arius inside my '69 Overlander (stringers and keel behind the front Gaucho, hull and crossmembers in the wardrobe).

Yeah, you have to set it up to use it, but it doesn't take 10 minutes once you get the hang of it.

Just a thought...

Doug
__________________

__________________
anhedonic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 10:28 AM   #3
4 Rivet Member
 
zduke4x's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 258
Images: 3
committed

Of course my neighbors think I should be committed over all my A/S times, repairs, and projects......but I am saying I am committed to the type of kayaks I use and enjoy....I even have an inflateable never used,sitting and taking up space.... just because I am after what I want in my MH and kayaking experiences. Thanks for the thought...jem
__________________
The Silver Buffalo
Saturn with Blue OX towbar
WBCCI # 14067
zduke4x is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 10:32 AM   #4
uwe
418
 
uwe's Avatar
 
2007 25' Safari FB SE
1958 22' Flying Cloud
1974 29' Ambassador
Yucca Valley , California
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 1963 26' Overlander
Posts: 4,767
Images: 41
Send a message via Skype™ to uwe
Depending on the type of kayak, you might consider adding a light Thule rack above the awning rail and transport your kayak on that. Thule and Yakima both offer universal mounting feet that can be bolted to the skin and short bars could be added to hold the kayaks.
The feet i am referring to re sinilar as the ones used to add racks to camper shells.
You would have to cut the cross bars to the size you'll need, but this would be a good and permanent solution to carrying kayaks.
I am not sure how much room you have, and which part of the roof would be most preferential for mounting a rack.
You might also try and remove the screens form the rear window and put the kayak through the wide open window. Of course if the kayak is wet and sandy, that might not be such a great idea.
__________________
Uwe
www.area63productions.com
uwe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 03:58 PM   #5
2 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 60
Hauling kayaks interests me as well. Please post a message regarding how you tackle this and thanks in advance for the info.
__________________
cherring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 05:16 PM   #6
2 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 80
Inflatable Kayak

Quote:
Originally posted by zduke4x
I even have an inflateable never used,sitting and taking up space
Please tell me more about your inflatable kayak. My wife has a plastic 12' Walden Scout, It never gets used because she can't load it on her Ford sedan and it won't fit in the Airstream. She just wants to paddle around small lakes and ponds for recreation and excercise, no whitewater stuff.

The motorhome has an air compressor for the air bag spring suspension and auxillary outlet for an air hose. Would the deflated kayak fit in a 20" high X 20" deep X 48" wide compartment and/or trunk of a Taurus.

This may be the answer to her dreams. Your reply would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
Jeff
__________________
jthew1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 05:27 PM   #7
2 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 60
Inflatable kayaks, also known as duckies, are made by several companies. Thrillseeker and Aire Force are 2 of the brands that we use at our outfitter base and have good luck with. They can be used for flatwater or whitewater and run approx. $1000. You can buy cheaper ones but IMHO you get what you pay for. We have some that our over 15 years old and are still used on the river all summer long.

They are easy to handle when not inflated and are made in 1- and 2-person styles.
__________________
cherring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 07:35 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Davydd's Avatar
 
Tonka Bay
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 767
Images: 13
Two Kayak Dilemma

We have two Perception Carolina kayaks that we plan to take with us on our travels but don't have the same problem as the motorhome owners. Whatever tow vehicle we use will have to carry our kayaks on top.

Since I am not a tall man and almost all tow vehicles are usually quite tall I once considered trailering the kayaks in my pre Airstream days. We have since developed satsifactory techniques for hoisting kayaks overhead so trailering is now out for me. You might want to consider that option with a motorhome. There are kayak trailers available.
__________________
Davydd
2015 Sprinter Class B Camper Van
(Former 1971 vintage Airstream Owner)
Davydd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 08:27 PM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 103
Images: 17
I'm sure hoping that a canoe will go on top of our, as yet to be purchased, SUV (Suburban-esque) tow vehicle, without there being a problem with the canoe hitting the front of the trailer.

Has anyone done this?

(I'm will to keep the canoe in the 15' range, although I'd love 17')
__________________
just starting to search!
darkStar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2003, 08:46 PM   #10
4 Rivet Member
 
zduke4x's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 258
Images: 3
inflatable kayak

In answer to the folded size of an inflatable kayak....here goes...I looked long and hard and best I can tell most would fit in your 20"x20"x48" size space folded, paddles come apart but still tend to be longer than 2 feet apart, usually they are not a problem stowing though.....as prev. mentioned there are many grades of crafts from serious expedition down to toy range.....

On ebay there are quite a few that I would call pretty good, around 100 bucks... for singles and more for doubles, that's for 2 people....certainly under 150 bucks....cheaper are heavy plastic and better are cloth covered plastic...all are repairable and for easy general use should last for years.

The high dollar, high quality stuff would be for serios work in my opinion and I prefer the hard shell materials for that...jem
__________________
The Silver Buffalo
Saturn with Blue OX towbar
WBCCI # 14067
zduke4x is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2003, 05:58 AM   #11
2 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 60
We haul canoes with our Tahoe all of the time. You should be fine with a Suburban. Just be sure that you have good roof racks. Yakima and Tule both make racks appropriate for this. You can buy them at store like REI.
__________________
cherring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2003, 06:01 AM   #12
BAUXITE
 
Ed Keyes's Avatar
 
2004 25' Classic
homosassa , Florida
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 50
Canoe on tow vehicle

Go with the 17' canoe. Performance better for solo or tandem unless you are looking at a small specialty canoe. Should not have problem with clearance. Canoe only has to extend over the back 12 to 18". Make sure the two lines over the canoe are tight ( use a truckers hitch) and be sure to put a line on bow and on the stern. It you get a vehicle with gutters you will have a more sucure platfform for racks. Don't cheat on the racks. Yakima or Thule are good. Have traveled over 500K with canoes and kayak miles without an incident.
__________________
Ed Keyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2003, 05:11 PM   #13
Rivet Master
 
yukionna's Avatar
 
Massachusetts
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: 1964 17' Bambi II
Posts: 4,278
Images: 18
Send a message via Yahoo to yukionna
We use the Thule "L" shaped racks for our two 17' kayaks which we transport on top of our Chevy Blazer. Ummmm, should I also be using bow and stern tie-downs, I wonder?

P.S.
What is a "truckers hitch?"
__________________
yukionna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2003, 08:35 AM   #14
BAUXITE
 
Ed Keyes's Avatar
 
2004 25' Classic
homosassa , Florida
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 50
Would reccomend bow and stern lines. If any of the hardware holding the racks to the car come lose on the highway, you will have a missile heading behind you to another car. The bow and stern lines should be firm but not too tight. If you tighten too much, it will cause the overhead lines to loosen.If you are not good with knots, use the straps that are made for this purpose. Stay away from the rubber strech cords. They dry out and snap with any stress. One other thought....... use a cover for your cockpit when it is on the roof. If rain water is collected in the boat it puts too much stress on the system
__________________

__________________
Ed Keyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.