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Old 04-16-2004, 06:43 PM   #1
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Hantavirus Alert!

Taken from the Tad Taylor LLC website:
"This is a simple note to all Airstream and trailer owners of the very serious health risk posed by Hanta virus. This disease is common in contaminated homes and work places [ESPECIALLY older buildings, as well as old trailers] where rodent activity, particularly stool, urine and bodies have been left, especially in contaminated wall and ceiling cavities. Use caution not to stir up and breath dust, or touch surfaces with bare hands. Use gloves and bleach [ 1 1/2 cups per gallon] or alcohol to decontaminate surfaces. Get dust and dirt wet or damp before working with it, to lower the ability for dust to spread or be breathed in.

Older trailers, especially 60's trailers and earlier, are almost all filled with mouse contaminated insulation. Almost all the trailers we have worked on are filled with serious contamination. If you have an old trailer, be very aware of the odor that is coming from it, especially in wet or damp weather, where those odors can become quite strong. We recommend any trailer with this type of contamination be completely torn apart, removing interior wall panels, including underpan area, to eliminate all contaminated materials. This is a serious problem, and is fairly standard for early 70's trailers on back.
For more info on Hanta virus, contact the CDC."

Not intending to open another can of worms here but for those of you who do not intend to have a look inside the belly skin area of your AS.........youd be surprised what u might find.
-Jason
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Old 04-17-2004, 05:03 AM   #2
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An over zealous new to me AS owner

Thanks for the posting Jason,

Hanta Virus is in 38 states now
38% of the Hanta Virus cases are fatal
Washington State found 14% of deer mice were infected in 2000

Checkout posting #43 from this thread that I pretty much hijacked from flyfsher for a little real experience with this virus.

http://www.airforums.com/forum...2&page=1&pp=50

My 74 old year father in law, my 10 year old son and I torn into this thing and started cleaning it up. Then I started wondering, after several hours of cleaning, about what kind of mice were living in this Tradewind that had been setting in rural Idaho for the last 15 plus years.

I'm the only one that's been back in the AS in the last week and a half and that is just to check traps. I'm calling my dad-in-law sometimes a couple times a day and watching my son like a hawk for any signs of this virus. My dad-in-law thinks I'm over reacting but if something like this catch up him, he would have a fight on his hands. The wife (she does the laundry) is running a low fever and is aching all over. She says it's from helping the 10 year old with soccer and scrubing the bedroom and just being tied. I'm I worried, you bet. My imigination is keeping pretty busy and causing a few sleepless nights thinking about what I should of done and what could happen because of one over zealous new to be Airstream owner. I figure we have about 5-6 more days before we can start feeling safe that none of us have pick up this nasty bug. So if I stop posting in this forum I guess You'll know the rest of the story.

Hope to keep you updated, Rod
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Old 04-17-2004, 08:03 AM   #3
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Rod,

My wife makes me wear a mask and use a bleach solution when I sweep out the garage.

Looking at the following map, Idaho has had 18 cases since inception of the study in 1993 - let's assume 10 years (I believe your TT came from Idaho recently). It works out to 1.8 cases per year in Idaho... Even though the risk is serious and every precaution should be taken, your chances of having or contracting the virus are incredibly small. I live in New Mexico where we hear about this all the time (looks like we get that award too; Most Hantavirus Cases of any State!). Use care (and bleach).

Best regards,

X

From the CDC website (see also >> CDC HANTAVIRUS INFORMATION LINK) :

Quote:
Clean Up Infested Areas, Using Safety Precautions:

Put on latex rubber gloves before cleaning up.

Do not stir up dust by sweeping up or vacuuming up droppings, urine or nesting materials.

Instead, thoroughly wet contaminated areas with detergent or liquid to deactivate the virus. Most general purpose disinfectants and household detergents are effective. However, a hypochlorite solution prepared by mixing 1 and 1/2 cups of household bleach in 1 gallon of water may be used in place of commercial disinfectant. When using the chlorine solution, avoid spilling the mixture on clothing or other items that may be damaged.

Once everything is wet, take up contaminated materials with a damp towel, then mop or sponge the area with disinfectant.

Spray dead rodents with disinfectant, then double-bag along with all cleaning materials and bury or burn—or throw out in appropriate waste disposal system. If burning or burying isn't feasible, contact your local or state health department about other disposal methods.

Finally, disinfect gloves before taking them off with disinfectant or soap and water. After taking off the clean gloves, thoroughly wash hands with soap and warm water.

When going into cabins or outbuildings (or work areas) that have been closed for awhile, open them up and air out before cleaning.

Hantaviruses and Disinfectants

Hantaviruses are surrounded by a lipid (fatty) envelope, so they are somewhat fragile. The lipid envelope can be destroyed and the virus killed by fat solvents, such as alcohol, ordinary disinfectants and household bleach. That is why one of the most important ways to prevent transmitting the disease is to carefully wet down dead rodents and areas where rodents have been with disinfectant and/or bleach. When you do this, you are killing the virus itself and reducing the chance that the virus will get into the air.

Strength and Quantity of Hypochlorite Solutions (Bleach)
Special Pathogens Branch recommends a 10% bleach solution be used to inactivate hantaviruses.
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Old 04-17-2004, 08:32 AM   #4
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Great infro Xray, love the map. This AS had been living about 45 minutes outside of Boise. I've been pouring over the Internet this last week and know logically the I think everything is OK. But there is always that chance.

My son and I were wearing dust masks and latex gloves, dad thought I was being over protective when we were in the Airstream.

I was using the vacuum on the carpet covered floor and in the cabinets, closets and drawers. Bad idea, put I was the only one in the trailer when I did it.

I've since soaked the carpet (going to the garbage soon) and the cabinets, closets, and drawers with lysol. Hope to attack the Tradewind again soon, better informed and probably alone, at least until I get the rest of the mouse garbage cleaned up and get the place deinfected.

Rod
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Old 04-17-2004, 08:36 AM   #5
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Aaron,

Bats a "known source"?????? Please substantiate your claim with real information. Otherwise everybody is going to start implicating bats too.

Best regards,

X
--------

I did a search and did find this:

Some REAL Bat Information

Quote:
Are there other diseases to be concerned about from bats?
The only other disease of public health concern in the United States is Histoplasmosis, which is caused by a fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum. This fungus lives in soil enriched by bird or bat droppings. Human infection is common in and adjacent to the Ohio and Mississippi River drainages where warm, humid climates favor fungal development. The fungus is rare in dry western and cool northern climates. It can be present, but is uncommon in dry, hot attics of buildings. Infection is caused by inhalation of air-borne spores in dust enriched by animal droppings. The vast majority of histoplasmosis cases in humans are asymptomatic or involve no more than flu-like symptoms, though a few individuals may become seriously ill, especially if exposed to large quantities of spore-laden dust. The disease can be avoided by not breathing dust suspected of being enriched by animal feces. Risks from bats are no different from those of birds.
Bat Hantavirus Link

Quote:
One of my neighbors is a renowned authority on bats. She said bats do not carry or transmit hantavirus. I e-mailed other authorities and they concur. Also I did an extensive Google search and found no information linking hantavirus with bats.

Bats are extremely important to the desert ecosystem. There are well documented cases of dumb people killing large populations of bats in caves and mine shafts because they feel they are vectors for such maladies as hantavirus. True, they do—in extremely rare instances—carry rabies. Please use this WEB site to spread knowledge; not rumors. LeRoy
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Old 04-17-2004, 08:36 AM   #6
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An added benefit of the bleaching is the elimination of mildew. I've been doing this whenever I open an area of the AS to work on it for the first time. Mix it in a spray bottle and soak to area, let it air out, clean it up. Helps keep my allergy to mold, mildew, dust mites, ect from being an issue.

Do you know where your airstream has been. I have a 68 and I have no idea where it's been over the years. I'm picking up a 59 May 1 and I will proceed as if it is contaminated.
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Old 04-17-2004, 08:53 AM   #7
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psychpw,
I think you about sum it up when you said "I will proceed as if it is contaminated"

The Nile Virus is in our state now and one suggestion here is to put out bat boxes to combat the skeeters. Don't bats live in bat boxes?

Rod
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Old 04-17-2004, 09:07 AM   #8
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Rod,

Bats will live in bat boxes so long as they are built and placed correctly.

I have built several bat boxes in the past.

Best regards,

X
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Old 04-17-2004, 09:47 AM   #9
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I'm sorry Aaron. I've searched and searched and can't find anything implicating bats and hantavirus. It appears that none exist, IMHO.

And, bats ARE NOT rodents, as you say.

Please see these links for more information on bats:

Bats ARE NOT rodents LINK from UC Berkely

Some REAL Bat Information

Quote:
Are there other diseases to be concerned about from bats?
The only other disease of public health concern in the United States is Histoplasmosis, which is caused by a fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum. This fungus lives in soil enriched by bird or bat droppings. Human infection is common in and adjacent to the Ohio and Mississippi River drainages where warm, humid climates favor fungal development. The fungus is rare in dry western and cool northern climates. It can be present, but is uncommon in dry, hot attics of buildings. Infection is caused by inhalation of air-borne spores in dust enriched by animal droppings. The vast majority of histoplasmosis cases in humans are asymptomatic or involve no more than flu-like symptoms, though a few individuals may become seriously ill, especially if exposed to large quantities of spore-laden dust. The disease can be avoided by not breathing dust suspected of being enriched by animal feces. Risks from bats are no different from those of birds.

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Old 04-17-2004, 10:16 AM   #10
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If the readers can't follow the thread very well, Aaron (wahoonc) deleted all his posts regarding bats and hantavirus... THANK GOODNESS!!!!

No hard feelings wahoonc! Really!

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Old 04-17-2004, 11:51 AM   #11
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lets keep this thread civil please.
My last can of worms got closed down.......shame on me for trying to share something I thought everyone would get something out of. Politics and religion are taboo subjects yes......... as far as I know, we are all adults here.

-Jason
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Old 04-17-2004, 12:00 PM   #12
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thanks for the great info Xray........
I had a mouse once for a few days in the Excella but since I started taking it apart I have not seen any evidence of more. I got on this subject lately because spring is such a miserable time of year for me. At the age of 33 i am now just begining to understand how bad allergies/airborne illness can be..........you would think someone with asthma would have cought on sooner!
-Jason
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Old 04-17-2004, 12:08 PM   #13
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Jason,

I am just finishing my second worse spring in NM because of juniper allergies. Mostly the eyes. Everyone around here suffers sooner or later.

There are a lot of alternative ways to clear your body of toxins so that it handles allergies better. Most here say it's liver problems that cause allergies...

Hope you feel better soon.



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Old 04-17-2004, 01:01 PM   #14
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Exclamation

Found a great Website that talks about the connection between the liver and allergies.
As for me, its not so much pollens as it is mold, mildew, DUST MITES, animal dander etc........
I do not get the typical symptoms much (itching eyes, scratchy throat, etc...) I get more feel heavily sedated and also just plain horrible! Extreme allergies are known to cause headaches and feelings of fullness in the head excessive drowsiness after eating sleepiness or, insomnia, ringing in the ears, recurrent Sinusitis and ear infections, Sore throat, Nausea and vomiting, Diarrhoea, Constipation, flatulence, Abdominal pain, CHRONIC FATIGUE, aching joints and muscles, binge eating, Anxiety attacks, Depression, tearfulness, unusually aggressive behaviour, apathy, Confusion, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, inability to concentrate... In such cases mechanisms other than the classic antigen-antibody response are almost certainly involved.

Among the many substances known to cause allergic reactions are dust, house dust mites, fur and feathers, tree and grass pollens, various plants, wool and other fabrics, nickel and other metals, gases and vapours given off by gas appliances, household cleaners, paints, solvents, and plastics, pesticide residues, non-stick coatings, various drugs, including penicillin, and of course many foods and food additives.
As for what to do,
Install a filter over bedroom air vents to prevent pet dander, dust, and molds from being blown in from other parts of the house through heating or air-conditioning ducts.
Use window shades or curtains that can be laundered or cleaned frequently, instead of heavy drapes.
Don’t hang sheets or clothing outdoors to dry, as pollens and molds can collect on them.
Wash bed linens in hot water (at least 130° Fahrenheit) and use your dryer's hottest setting to kill mites and control animal allergens.
Keep pets out of the bedroom to limit exposure to pet dander while sleeping.
Minimize dust and dust mites by choosing carpeting with low pile, or better yet, eliminating carpeting altogether.
Clean, cool dry air is best while sleeping. Keep central air-conditioning running at night or use window air-conditioning units. If air-conditioning is available, keep windows closed at night to avoid exposure to pollens.
Enclose pillows, mattresses, and box springs in zippered, air-tight casings to curtail mite activity.
Do not use a feather- or down-filled pillow.
Keep dust from accumulating by vacuuming floors and cleaning surfaces weekly.
Keep small knickknacks, books, and CDs inside cabinets or drawers so that they don't collect dust.
Replace synthetic pillows every 2 to 3 years.

Keep the number of houseplants to a minimum, as they promote mold growth.
Avoid smelling cut flowers, as the close contact can put you in touch with their pollen.
To reduce mold, store all firewood outside and eliminate straw and jute (a natural fiber like hemp or rattan) accessories from the home.
If carpeting is necessary, choose a type with a low pile...it offers fewer places for dust and allergens to hide and is easier to clean.
Keep dust from accumulating by vacuuming floors and cleaning wooden surfaces weekly.
Surfaces should be smooth, easy to clean, and free of objects that can collect dust.
Use a vacuum cleaner with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to collect dust and dust mites.
Electrostatic filters help remove airborne particles and some dust mites.
Have ducts in a forced-air heating system cleaned at least once a year.
Dust mites thrive in high humidity. Use a dehumidifier, if possible

Keep your pet out of the bedroom (and off the bed, the carpet, the furniture, your pillows).
Keep your pet outside as much as possible.
Brush your pet outside of the house to remove loose hair and other allergens.
Have someone else empty the litter box or clean the cage.
Regularly clean or replace any bedding or carpeting that is contaminated with animal dander.
Install an air cleaner (an air filtration system) in your house.
Have someone wash your pet weekly to cut down dander.

Electric and hot-water heating systems are preferred over forced warm-air systems because they don't disperse dust, mold, and pet dander throughout the house.
In addition to removing pollen and other allergens, central or room air-conditioners are also effective in controlling the humidity that makes dust mites and molds grow more quickly.
Evaporative coolers or "swamp coolers", popular in drier areas, are a source of mold and mold spores.
Avoid using fireplaces or wood-burning stoves, as they produce particles that can worsen allergies.
Install an air cleaner with a central electrostatic precipitator or high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter unit.
Replace central air/heat unit fiberglass filters monthly.
Install a dehumidifier to keep air dry and also reduce mold growth.

Put an herb garden on your windowsill instead of flowers to reduce airborne pollen.
Mold loves places where food is stored. Clean refrigerator bins and drip trays regularly.
Don't forget to vacuum behind your refrigerator, too, to prevent dust build-up.
Keep your pet out of the kitchen while you’re preparing food and eating, to minimize animal dander.
Keep windows closed when pollen counts are high.

Any other ideas about combating aleergies are greatly appreciated. I think ill put my gas mask back on now
-Jason
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