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Old 03-26-2011, 08:04 PM   #57
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Tachometer Usage

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Originally Posted by DaveFL View Post
When all is quiet, and you are cruising, it would be hard to tell if you are in the right gear and running efficiently without it. Have used it to change to a lower gear while towing.
Also when downshifted on mountain runs to make sure it doesn't over rev, and when it is time to punch the brakes. Maybe my driving an older unit makes me more concerned with where the rpm's are at.
I use the tach religeously, BUT the guage on the X5 I use most is the "Energy Control" guage (aka mpg, fuel consumption) which tell me how heavily loaded the engine is. I alway manually shift the transmission ONLY when the guage shows max mpg as this indicates the drive train is unloaded ......... less shock, wear and tear.
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:28 PM   #58
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An interesting thread. Maybe it's because I'm older than I used to be but driving at 60mph on any freeway/highway with a trailer in tow is quite fast enough for me and for the law (except California, apparently). If it's not fast enough for the other road users then that's their problem.
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:51 PM   #59
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The speed limit in Oregon and California with trailers in tow is 55. We just returned from one of many trips to see our kids in Calif, and tow at 59-60mph. The "tach" rests at 1500 on our Ram 3500 Dually with a 12 mpg rating. ( truck with only 10K miles so far)

The higher the speed, the more accentuated is the kinetic energy in play. ( last Airstream Life issue) Thus speed compromises safety and reaction times.

When we entered Yosemite NP two weeks ago, I asked the Ranger which road was the best exit from the park, given the twisting, and at times narrow roads. He asked me where I was going...and for the first time in my life I was able to state: "I don't care!!!" He just smiled and shook his head........

My point: we are blessed not to be in a hurry, and hope you are as well.

To quote Robert Frost: " And I have miles to go before I sleep". I hope to enjoy every one of them.......Please be careful, it's dangerous out there!
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:59 PM   #60
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I wish I could just slow down. I just went to Colorado from Texas 1500 miles round trip. I would go 75-80mph...consistantly. I tried for about 30 miles to go 60mph and my fuel mileage was wonderful,..but just couldn't do it.

Shane
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Old 03-27-2011, 01:12 AM   #61
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60-65 mph depending on traffic and weather conditions. 70 mph to pass slower traffic.
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Old 03-27-2011, 07:27 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrawfordGene View Post
We generally don't go over 65. With the Tundra, the speedometer reads about 66.5 when we are really going 65. The reason—first it was because Airstream seemed to recommend it and we were novices, but 65 just feels right. Also, at first we thought the Marathons were speed rated at 65, but they are not speed rated at all. The Michelins we have now have a speed rating that is somewhere around 100, but we don't believe that speed to be mandatory.

I know our Tundra has very good brakes and I adjust and inspect the trailer brakes periodically. But, have you ever had to stop truck and trailer very, very quickly? It takes a lot longer than the truck alone because, in our case, at least double the mass despite good brakes. I had to do a panic stop once and it was scary. I was only going about 30 when the large truck in front of us stopped fast—maybe he was empty and I was trying to see around him and thus didn't notice for a few seconds he was stopping. His rear bumper kept getting closer as I stood on the brakes (standing on the brakes doesn't help, but is emotionally necessary). We stopped in time, but time moved very slowly for several very long seconds.

If the traffic is moving very fast and the spaces between vehicles are small, I try to balance between keeping up with the flow and leaving a lot of space in front of me. This can be impossible because someone, perhaps with a Freudian death wish, fills the space. If I go slower than traffic, interruption of the flow can increase the chance of accidents. Following other large vehicles means poor visibility ahead, but they can't stop any faster than me (unless they are empty, adding to the unknowns) so that's a benefit. Staying in the slower right lanes is dangerous because of traffic entering and exiting. Changing lanes is also dangerous especially when there are people weaving in and out trying to get to Point B 20 seconds faster.

Or, when there is moderate traffic, we might get in synch with a large truck that passes us going downhill, probably because of more mass, and we pass it going uphill because we have less mass. This can go on for miles and miles and keeps us awake when traffic is light, but becomes a pain in heavier traffic. I try to get fairly far ahead of the truck when that happens (the truck driver is probably thinking the same thing), but as traffic increases I may just follow.

Driving requires thinking. There no set speed in many situations and making constant decisions over the best approach, especially in city and urban interstate traffic, means towing is a lot more tiring than just cruising in a car or smaller truck. Sometimes I want to buy a sports car and drive really fast on curvy roads and blow off steam. Maybe the solution is to have a MoHo and a sporty toad (sporty toad sounds weird).

One of the things that has happened, is that I drive a little slower than I used to because I've gotten used to 65 while towing. My credo—more scenery per minute—has been compromised. But 65 is a nominal speed, maybe an upper limit, and not a constant.

Gene
Hello Gene
Do you Post on the Tundra Talk forum ? John
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Old 03-27-2011, 07:43 AM   #63
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I like 55-60 but we get better mpg at 65-70. At nearly 4 bucks per gallon, we must opt for 65. 2007 Dodge 3500 DRW 6.7 Cumins 6 speed manual tranny pulling 34 Classic. Safe & happy travels. John
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Old 03-27-2011, 08:53 AM   #64
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The speed limit in AZ is 75 in a lot of places. 65-70 seems to be the norm for the RV folks. Sometimes you feel like you are "in the way" as folks around you push for 80.
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Old 03-27-2011, 09:13 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveFL View Post
When all is quiet, and you are cruising, it would be hard to tell if you are in the right gear and running efficiently without it. Have used it to change to a lower gear while towing.
Also when downshifted on mountain runs to make sure it doesn't over rev, and when it is time to punch the brakes. Maybe my driving an older unit makes me more concerned with where the rpm's are at.
Most of the driving we do here in Michigan is relatively flat. Usually, I downshift or turn off the overdrive when it feels like the engine bogging down or the trans is hunting for which gear to be in. Someday, when we get out and do some real cross-country driving, I'm sure the tachometer will come in handy.
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Old 03-27-2011, 09:32 PM   #66
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Hello Gene
Do you Post on the Tundra Talk forum ? John
John, no. Nor on Tundra Solutions.

Gene
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Old 03-27-2011, 09:40 PM   #67
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I like the 60-65 mph range, which puts me about 5-10 mph slower than most other RVs on the road. The other day we were going down I-65 south getting passed by 5th wheel after 5th wheel (mostly WI and IL tags), and my 7 year old said "Daddy those people must be in a big hurry to get to the beach".

-Chris
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:14 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrawfordGene
We generally don't go over 65. With the Tundra, the speedometer reads about 66.5 when we are really going 65. The reason—first it was because Airstream seemed to recommend it and we were novices, but 65 just feels right. Also, at first we thought the Marathons were speed rated at 65, but they are not speed rated at all. The Michelins we have now have a speed rating that is somewhere around 100, but we don't believe that speed to be mandatory.

I know our Tundra has very good brakes and I adjust and inspect the trailer brakes periodically. But, have you ever had to stop truck and trailer very, very quickly? It takes a lot longer than the truck alone because, in our case, at least double the mass despite good brakes. I had to do a panic stop once and it was scary. I was only going about 30 when the large truck in front of us stopped fast—maybe he was empty and I was trying to see around him and thus didn't notice for a few seconds he was stopping. His rear bumper kept getting closer as I stood on the brakes (standing on the brakes doesn't help, but is emotionally necessary). We stopped in time, but time moved very slowly for several very long seconds.

If the traffic is moving very fast and the spaces between vehicles are small, I try to balance between keeping up with the flow and leaving a lot of space in front of me. This can be impossible because someone, perhaps with a Freudian death wish, fills the space. If I go slower than traffic, interruption of the flow can increase the chance of accidents. Following other large vehicles means poor visibility ahead, but they can't stop any faster than me (unless they are empty, adding to the unknowns) so that's a benefit. Staying in the slower right lanes is dangerous because of traffic entering and exiting. Changing lanes is also dangerous especially when there are people weaving in and out trying to get to Point B 20 seconds faster.

Or, when there is moderate traffic, we might get in synch with a large truck that passes us going downhill, probably because of more mass, and we pass it going uphill because we have less mass. This can go on for miles and miles and keeps us awake when traffic is light, but becomes a pain in heavier traffic. I try to get fairly far ahead of the truck when that happens (the truck driver is probably thinking the same thing), but as traffic increases I may just follow.

Driving requires thinking. There no set speed in many situations and making constant decisions over the best approach, especially in city and urban interstate traffic, means towing is a lot more tiring than just cruising in a car or smaller truck. Sometimes I want to buy a sports car and drive really fast on curvy roads and blow off steam. Maybe the solution is to have a MoHo and a sporty toad (sporty toad sounds weird).

One of the things that has happened, is that I drive a little slower than I used to because I've gotten used to 65 while towing. My credo—more scenery per minute—has been compromised. But 65 is a nominal speed, maybe an upper limit, and not a constant.

Gene
That was a great post as is usual for you Gene..
Tnx. Dennis
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Old 03-18-2012, 07:32 AM   #69
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What's Your Interstate Speed?

57-59 mph at around 1,725-rpm. Best mpg on a Cummins-powered Dodge truck is, according to that engine builder, at 1,300-1,500 rpm. And, aerodynamic resistance rockets skyward past 60-mph. So, 57-59 mph is the fastest slow speed that works well (1,725-rpm until I have the rear axle gears changed to drop rpms to enhance this further).

As for being one of the sheeple, afraid of moving at a different rate than others: Learn to use the mirrors. They aren't optional, after all, and it appears your driver training failed to show you how to use them.

Overtaking traffic can be managed to your advantage. After all, the person passing has the burden of mistake-making on him. It is not on you, for you have the R-O-W if otherwise proceeding legally. Learn to distinguish the point where overtaking becomes passing and adjust accordingly.

Do not move to the right side of your lane (with the possible exception of big trucks) as the cretins tend to move towards you if you do so. The unconcious, unthinking driver needs guidance. Alternately, if one moves towards the left of ones lane, the overtaking vehicle will, themselves move to their left as they should when moving into the zone to pass. One can be back to lane-centered as they pass keeping both maneuvering room and better-than-adequate distance between vehicles.

There has always been slower traffic. There always will be. And the fewer the lane changes, braking events (and subsequent acceleration events) the better the mpg and lower the stress level in towing. Learning how to deal with the droolers is just awareness and training ones self.

The fewest brake applications and steering corrections is not only the best for mpg (according to the big truck manufacturers), but a measure of successful driving as well. One substitutes number of applications for degree of force when one does have to apply inputs beyond being lane-centered.

There is a best speed, and there is a rhythm to making one leg of a trip after another disappear with the lowest amount of fatigue. Hurrying is never part of it. The actual road speed is only a part of what is meant by hurrying. Let the stress of the cretins, droolers and morons -- running along bumper to bumper in packs -- be their burden, not yours.

Preserving space and running the vehicles at lower speeds saves more than just fuel.

.
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Old 03-18-2012, 12:20 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REDNAX View Post

Learning how to deal with the droolers is just awareness and training ones self.
Trying to think like a drooler is not all that easy. (I like to think) I don't think that way, so getting into their heads is a chore. Do I expect the worst possible behavior? Which of all the worst possible behaviors will that be? Texting? Cutting me off and then slowing down? Cutting in and out constantly? Phone calls leading to slow, slow driving? Wheelies? The one I worry about most is the guy who is driving like an accident waiting to happen—when it happens, I don't want to be anywhere near him. I try to pass those guys and leave them behind.

Smooth driving, as I think Rednax is advocating, is a good way to go.

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