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Old 04-07-2014, 11:28 AM   #15
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1971 25' Tradewind
Menlo Park , California
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The interior panels are much easier to remove. They are held in place with pop rivets which can be drilled out using a 1/8" drill bit. Drill through the center. The back falls into the wall and the front ring stays on the drill bit. You'll need a pop riveting tool to put them back in, but so much in an Airstream is pop riveted that the tool will get a lot of use.
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Old 04-07-2014, 11:34 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by MayaPapaya View Post
Hi everyone.

I have a 1962 Globetrotter that I want to fix up and use. I'm not emotionally invested in retaining the original feel of the interior materials. I like the layout but would like to have some fun with the choices I make. Will I hurt the value of my trailer if I keep the layout but go a little crazy on the inside?

Are the interior panels aluminum or fiberglass? Is that something that is a nightmare to polish? I was thinking of airbrushing a sky and clouds on the walls and ceiling if stripping and polishing doesn't make sense.

Do composting toilets hurt the value? They seem so much more practical if you are not staying somewhere you can dump your tank frequently.
Customizing always brings up the question of value.

As long as your changes function correctly, then pleasing your wishes is the way to go.

Certainly however, when it comes to resale, who would want to partake the same wishes as yours?

If you plan on keeping the trailer for many years, then handing it down to the kids or another family member, is always a nice way to go.

Keep in mind, make the coach waterproof as well as replacing the axle, if needed, as torsion axles only last about 25 years. It's not the axle that fails, but it is the rubber rods within the axle tube that fails. Most importantly, those rods cannot be replaced.

While your at it, replace the shocks as well.

Check all the window and door gaskets. Upgraded gaskets are available, that are far superior to the originals.

Andy
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Old 04-08-2014, 02:21 AM   #17
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1962 19' Globetrotter
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New Plan

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Originally Posted by MayaPapaya View Post
Hi everyone.

I have a 1962 Globetrotter that I want to fix up and use.
Please let me know what you think.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 1962 Airstream Globetrotter tweaked plans.pdf (211.2 KB, 39 views)
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Old 04-08-2014, 02:27 AM   #18
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1962 19' Globetrotter
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Hey Barbie.

Glad to know it's not crazy hard. Love those rock guards you made. They're magical. Have a feeling I have years of work ahead of me.
Do you happen to know if it's possible to coat those old bathtubs and change the color?

Thanks.
-Maya
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Old 04-08-2014, 09:32 AM   #19
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I have read on the forum of people using an epoxy product with good results. It's stinky and potentially messy and requires attention, but gives a sturdy result. Our shower pan has a final coat of epoxy that we mixed white pigment into, but you can get it already colored.

You'll probably have better luck using google type in (without the quotation marks) "site:airforums.com " and then your search terms. So, for instance, this:

site:airforums.com epoxy bathtub paint

The hits (below the ads) are all from Airforums. Good luck!
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Old 04-08-2014, 09:47 AM   #20
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Buffalo , Wyoming
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MayaPapaya View Post
Hey Barbie.

Glad to know it's not crazy hard. Love those rock guards you made. They're magical. Have a feeling I have years of work ahead of me.
Do you happen to know if it's possible to coat those old bathtubs and change the color?

Thanks.
-Maya
I used epoxy appliance paint on my bathtub and sink. It's with the spray paints at Home Depot. They had an almond color that matched the rest of my interior. It looks good and idications are that it should hold up well. It stinks real bad when you spray it, and cover everything because overspray carries a long way.
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Old 04-08-2014, 10:09 AM   #21
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The best way to assess for floor and frame rot is to remove the belly pan and remove all the old pink fiberglass and see what you have. You will see any rotten wood and any rusted frame members. Keep in mind that even if you have some rust, it may be surface rust and can be cleaned up and painted. You do not need to remove the shell off the frame to replace sections of the floor though that would be the way to go if you wanted to replace the whole floor. . You may or may not have to remove interior panels, and even if you do, they are fairly easy to replace, just make sure you mark their position.

As somebody else mentioned, you cant pull wires through, there are too many sharp edges that would catch them and destroy the insulation.

I looked at your plan, looks good. Without seeing the original layout, my only caution would be to keep things where they are unless you want the added expense and work of relocating things like vent stacks and holding tanks. If you are experienced at home repair, lots of the tasks won't be too far removed from that. Do expect that it will take 3x as long to do a job as you initially estimate. If you are going to pay somebody to do the work, it will get very expensive, very quickly.

You might want to look at my blog, it details what I have gone through so far with our '73 overlander, and keep in mind that this unit was in fairly good shape when we bought it. Hope all this helps.
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