Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-29-2017, 06:21 PM   #101
Rivet Master
 
dbj216's Avatar

 
1986 34' Limited
1975 27' Overlander
Conifer , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5,308
Images: 1
Wow, a cross country trip. Sea to shinning sea! Are you pulling your Excella?

We made many trips from Minnesota to Denver to visit our sons, usually twice a year. The trip across the great plains got rather old, but it was good Airstream travel training for us. So we retired and moved here to the foothills southwest of Denver. We love being close to our sons.

So now we try to take a spring and a fall trip in the Limited. We hope to use our Trade Wind to explore Colorado and the southwest on short mid week outings. My challenge it to get my wife to feel comfortable in the Trade Wind. She likes her Limited much better. I'm afraid the Limited is not a very good mountain highway trailer. Too long for the switch backs and the like. The Trade Wind is about perfect for these mountain highways.

David
__________________

dbj216 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2017, 11:27 PM   #102
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
David

Not cross country. We flew into San Francisco and are seeing the SF area, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite and the Carmel area with our rental car- a VW Beetle. We are having a blast!Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4151.JPG
Views:	72
Size:	477.2 KB
ID:	290836

Photo is near Mt. Tamalpais looking over the cloud cover over the Pacific.
__________________

TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2017, 01:10 PM   #103
Rivet Master
 
dbj216's Avatar

 
1986 34' Limited
1975 27' Overlander
Conifer , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5,308
Images: 1
Well, that does sound like a whole lot more fun than laying under your Trade Wind wrestling insulation and belly aluminum. I sure see why Lake Tahoe is so famous. It is a beautiful area, maybe one of the best in the US.

How appropriate to be in California and driving a beetle.

Enjoy your trip even without the Airstream.

David
dbj216 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2017, 08:27 PM   #104
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
More gray water tank improvements

I have not worked on the Tradewind now for about 8 weeks due to travel, some work, more travel and certainly some laziness on my part.

I commented earlier on Airstream's method of supporting the gray tank was to install a metal pan under the tank that would rust out over time. I think this was a terrible design. It added weight and required an additional 1.5" of angle iron welded to the bottom of the 5" C channel to make room for the pan and the insulation for the tank. I opted to remove the pan and attached the flanged gray water tank directly to the bottom of the floor using about 25 screws. This saved the weight of the pan and allowed me to move the front wall of the bumper trunk about 6" forward directly next to the gray water tank. This can be seen in the gray water tank photo below.

Since I did not reinstall the pan to support the tank, then I would not need the additional 1.5" angle iron under the 5" frame. I decided to cut this off. This was quite a job as I was cutting through 1/8" steel plus some pretty heavy welds. I used a 4.5" cutting wheel. It started out slow and was tough to do, but I finally got the hang of it and completed the job in about 2 hours. See the 2 photos attached. This was a lot of work, but I could not bare the thought of looking at that extra 1.5" of frame just sticking below the rest of the smooth belly pan. I am looking forward to the improvement in the smooth appearance of the belly pan without the bump when it gets to the gray water tank.

Removing the 1.5" of extra frame also meant that my bumper trunk was going to be 1.5" shallower. That is OK by me. I still increased the bumper trunk area by 35% by going from an area of 8" x 6.5" to and area of 14" x 5.0". The last photo shows the bumper trunk.

Tomorrow I plan to insulate the tank and install the belly pan to cover the tank.

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9293.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	391.4 KB
ID:	295548   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9297.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	520.0 KB
ID:	295549  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9323.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	263.1 KB
ID:	295550   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9292.jpg
Views:	77
Size:	202.8 KB
ID:	295551  

TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2017, 10:10 PM   #105
3 Rivet Member
 
1967 24' Tradewind
Blairstown , New Jersey
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 124
I like your idea to screw the black tank to the floor and plan to do the same thing on our '67. Could you share more photos of the design of your bumper trunk? Ours did not have one when I bought it.
__________________
Wayne
rasmuw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 07:50 AM   #106
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
Wayne

The bumper trunk is really quite simple. The front wall is secured to the bottom of the floor using the same screws that are securing the waste tank. The rear wall is the bumper. The bottom is just a sheet of aluminum- I have removed the right side to provide more clarity. It is laying on the blue tarp in the photo.

I have to admit that my claim of more volume is not true. The original volume was 58 x 11 x 6.5. The new trunk volume is 58 x 14 x 5. However because it is shallower and wider, it will be easier to store coiled up hoses and extension cords.

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9324.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	355.9 KB
ID:	295583   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9325.jpg
Views:	61
Size:	312.3 KB
ID:	295584  

TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 09:24 AM   #107
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
Wayne

Here is another photo of the right side of the front wall of the bumper trunk secured to the floor.

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9327.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	215.9 KB
ID:	295588  
TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 05:50 PM   #108
3 Rivet Member
 
1967 24' Tradewind
Blairstown , New Jersey
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 124
Thanks, Dan. The pictures are very helpful. What gauge aluminum did you use? What fasteners did you use to attach the bottom to the bumper and the front of the trunk?
__________________
Wayne
rasmuw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 07:40 PM   #109
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
Wayne

The aluminum is belly pan material from AirParts (www.airpartsinc.com). The thickness is .025" (22 gauge I believe). It was easy ordering from them. I used 1/8" pop rivets to hold it together, #12 x 1" screws to secure the gray water tank to the floor.

You can cut the Aluminum by scoring it with a utility knife, tip from AirParts, and I bought a brake from Harbor Freight to bend it.

Dan
TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 07:50 PM   #110
Rivet Master
 
dbj216's Avatar

 
1986 34' Limited
1975 27' Overlander
Conifer , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5,308
Images: 1
Glad to see you are back at it on the Trade Wind. Vintage Airstreams are a hobby and not more important than family or vocations. We all understand that.

The back end of your trailer is coming together nicely just the way you want it. All of our trailers are personalized in some way. Yours is very logical and very usable even for the next owner.

I don't think I told you, but I decided to sell my beloved Trade Wind this summer. Why? well we weren't using it much as the wife likes her 86 Limited much better. As you know, the mid sixties Airstreams had some unique features that are no longer readily available like the Corning windows, Bargman door lockset, Herr vent lifts, and the like. I was too nervous to let my son's take it out for fear of something breaking. And I was pretty much done with the "improvements" I wanted to make. I wanted a new project.

I think my Trade Wind ended up very usable and nice enough. The new owner is a vintage Airstream enthusiasts and will make it better as well as enjoy traveling with it.

So I purchased a 75 Overlander International trim and will start the renovation process all over again. This trailer is built much more like the wife's 86 than my old 66. The interior is in pretty good shape, and so it the body. But the subfloor and frame will need some work. It should keep me busy for quite some time. 75 trailer parts are more available than the mid sixties or earlier. I see this trailer as our "family" trailer. Please excuse the photo of an Overlander in this Trade Wind thread.

Okay, life's story over. Now, heeeer's Touring Dan.

David
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1709 As found street side.jpg
Views:	52
Size:	223.4 KB
ID:	295638  
dbj216 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 09:06 PM   #111
3 Rivet Member
 
1967 24' Tradewind
Blairstown , New Jersey
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by TouringDan View Post
Wayne

The aluminum is belly pan material from AirParts (www.airpartsinc.com). The thickness is .025" (22 gauge I believe). It was easy ordering from them. I used 1/8" pop rivets to hold it together, #12 x 1" screws to secure the gray water tank to the floor.

You can cut the Aluminum by scoring it with a utility knife, tip from AirParts, and I bought a brake from Harbor Freight to bend it.

Dan
I'm ready to tackle the bumper storage, thanks to you!
__________________
Wayne
rasmuw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2017, 07:52 AM   #112
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
David

Great find on that 75 Overlander International. It is a real beauty! I love the blue stripe and the blue trim at the banana wrap. I am sure you will do a great makeover on it so it suits your camping needs.

Glad to hear that you found a good home for your 66 Tradewind. That's important.

Dan
TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2017, 07:09 AM   #113
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
GRAY TANK INSULATION AND COVERING IT WITH THE BELLY PAN

I finally got my gray water tank insulated. Photo 1 shows Roxul insulation installed around the tank, then installing 1" Foamular insulation under it where it could be installed. This photo is only of the left side of the tank. Photo 2 then shows covering the bottom of the tank with Reflectix insulation where there was not room for the Foamular insulation. This photo also shows the two pieces of 1" angle aluminum that I installed to support the part of the belly pan under the middle of the gray water tank. I had to cut the angle aluminum to fit the contour of the gray water tank.

I could not help but think about the new 120k Airstreams that apparently have no insulation in the belly pan. I really don't understand their reasoning.

The hardest piece of belly pan to install was also the first piece since I had to cut out an area where it went over the dump valve that came below the bottom of the tank. I was concerned how I was going to hold the sheet metal in place as I positioned it and installed the pop rivets. This turned out not to be too difficult. I installed a small piece of angled aluminum at the rear of the dump valve and a piece also at the front of the belly pan covering the gray water tank (photo 3). This also shows the use of duct tape to hold up the edges of the belly pan material. BTW, I like the Gorilla brand as it is so heavy and sticky. Photo 4 shows the entire belly pan covering the gray water tank installed along with the bottom of the bumper trunk.

I used 3/16" wide flange pop rivets.

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9328.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	268.8 KB
ID:	296058   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9330.jpg
Views:	61
Size:	410.0 KB
ID:	296059  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9331.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	371.1 KB
ID:	296060   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9333.jpg
Views:	72
Size:	302.8 KB
ID:	296061  

TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2017, 12:17 PM   #114
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
One Person Installation of the Belly Pan

The belly pan on my 66 Airstream was originally installed in two long longitudinal sections from front to back and connected at the centerline of the trailer. When replacing the belly pan this was not an option for me. I decided to install it in 4 ft. sections starting at the back and ending at the front. This would allow each piece to overlap and would not allow the airflow created while traveling to open up the overlapping sections of belly pan.

The problem, of course, is how do you do this lying on your back and working by yourself. I was really concerned about how to do this, but I came up with a solution that was really pretty simple and worked very well.

I started by installing a 1" x 72" piece of 1/16" angle aluminum using a 3/16" wide flange rivet at the first cross bracket closest to where the belly pan is being installed. At the other end I installed a wood brace with some clearance at the top. This allows the 48" piece of belly pan to be slide on top of the angled aluminum and properly positioned. I then inserted a shim under the wood support to allow the angled aluminum to hold the sheet metal tight against the floor joists. Duct tape can then be used to secure the belly pan in place until the 3/16" wide flange rivets are installed. I then started rivet installation at the middle and worked my way toward the edge.
The attached photos are provided for clarity. This worked really well for me.

One additional tip that I learned the hard way. I am used to working with wood and have always drilled holes using the high speed setting on my drill. I learned that it is best to drill holes in metal using the slow speed setting (#1).

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9334.jpg
Views:	65
Size:	283.7 KB
ID:	296080   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9335.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	288.6 KB
ID:	296081  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9337.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	298.5 KB
ID:	296082   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9336.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	286.1 KB
ID:	296083  

TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2017, 01:23 PM   #115
Rivet Master
 
dbj216's Avatar

 
1986 34' Limited
1975 27' Overlander
Conifer , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5,308
Images: 1
I've done three of those stupid belly pans on my back, and my have to do the forth this winter.

Your ideas for holding that floppy piece of aluminum in place are novel. Thank you for sharing your ideas. I too went "sideways" instead one long longitudinal piece mainly because I was on my back. I used a 2x4 from side to side that I could slip the aluminum over, then lift it into place, and wedge the 2x4 pretty tight with my jack stands and some "shims" Yes, drilling on a slow speed is important for cutting the metal, not trying to "grind" it at too fast of speed. I should go get my "speeds and feeds" chart out and see what RPM is best for a 3/16 drill in mild steel.

I thought the rear banana wraps would be straightforward since I had the old ones as a pattern. However, I found it quite challenging to get them to fit. Maybe you will come up with a better method than I, especially since I had no method at all. I do know that matching the curve of the rear body is very important, and I think I had too many tabs bent up.

David
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1406 Belly Corner Tabs (Small).jpg
Views:	50
Size:	67.1 KB
ID:	296089  
dbj216 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2017, 06:35 PM   #116
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
THE BELLY PAN REPLACEMENT IS COMPLETE!

The belly pan replacement is finally complete, at least the back half which is all I am doing this go round along with the installation of new axles and disk brakes and modifications and repair to the gray water tank.

Next is the banana wraps and the new axles and disk brakes. Thanks for the warning David on the difficulty of fabricating and installing the banana wraps.

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9338.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	185.5 KB
ID:	296112   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9339.jpg
Views:	57
Size:	244.5 KB
ID:	296113  

TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2017, 08:01 PM   #117
4 Rivet Member
 
Slats's Avatar
 
1966 24' Tradewind
Kansas City , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 365
Images: 1
Thanks for the informative post. I was thinking that when I get to the belly pan installation I would use a variation of the old sheet rocker trick of a T made with 2 X 4s for holding the ceiling sheet rock in place while screwing it to the joists. I like your version.
Slats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2017, 08:06 PM   #118
4 Rivet Member
 
Slats's Avatar
 
1966 24' Tradewind
Kansas City , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 365
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbj216 View Post
I thought the rear banana wraps would be straightforward since I had the old ones as a pattern. However, I found it quite challenging to get them to fit. Maybe you will come up with a better method than I, especially since I had no method at all. I do know that matching the curve of the rear body is very important, and I think I had too many tabs bent up.

David
Same here, David. Perhaps someone can chime in on what the trick is to getting the new ones to fit like the old ones.
Slats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2017, 08:00 PM   #119
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
NEW AXLE INSTALLATION

I decided to put off the banana wrap installation and install the new axles.

I purchased these from Colin Hyde. I expected them to fit perfectly, but he also told me that I would have to drill new holes for securing the axles to the frame.

I installed the first axle today. Installation was quite simple, but also difficult in some ways. The easy part was putting the axles in position to install. I put a 6x6 on the pavement and put a bottle jack on top of it at each end of the axle. I then lifted the axle into its cavity in the frame. Now tip #1- the 6x6 needs to be parallel to the frame so that the axle is positioned properly in the cavity. I started jacking the axle with the 6x6 on the pavement and it just did not look right. So I added shims so that it would be parallel with the frame. Tip #2- Install the shock absorber on the axle before you jack the axle up into the frame. Ask me how I know. Notice that in the photos the shock absorber has not been installed. Now for the hard part. This is drilling the 5/8" holes and torquing each bolt to 150 ft-lbs. Tip#3- use a 5/8" drill bit made in the USA and use an angle drill so you don't get hurt.

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9342.jpg
Views:	49
Size:	468.8 KB
ID:	296168   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9343.jpg
Views:	52
Size:	428.7 KB
ID:	296169  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_9344.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	549.0 KB
ID:	296170  
TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2017, 11:23 AM   #120
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar

 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,359
REAR AXLE INSTALLATION

After installing the front axle, the rear axle went in much easier. That is what experience does for you. Some more tips- the heavier the bottle jack the better, as the weight of it and the large piston will make it easier to balance the axle on top- remember, I did this by myself. My bottle jack was 20 tons. Also if you drill about a 3/16" pilot hole it will be easier to drill the 5/8" hole. I used the measuring tape to make sure that the 6x6 and the Airstream frame were parallel. This is required to make sure that the jack is perpendicular to the frame when you are lifting the axle into the opening in the frame. The last picture shows the rear axle all set with the bare spindle ready to install the disc brake assemblies. Notice the Zirk fitting in the end of the spindle. This will make it real easy to add grease. I learned about this available feature when I talked to Colin Hyde about ordering the axles. I would have not been a happy camper if I had ordered the axles without this feature now that it is available. That is one of the advantages of ordering from somebody who has ordered replacement axles for lots of Airstreams.

Dan
__________________

TouringDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1963 Tradewind Original Wheel & Tire size?? BurritoWagon 1959-69 Tradewind 20 02-08-2012 02:27 PM
HENSLEY CUB w/73 Tradewind my3sonsdad Hitches, Couplers & Balls 5 08-02-2011 07:31 PM
1961 Tradewind Custom dorchstream Member Introductions 5 05-07-2011 08:51 AM
Adding a larger grey tank to a 78 Tradewind johnhh Waste Systems, Tanks & Totes 3 04-04-2011 12:43 PM
uh, oops. original Tradewind dinette design? SpaceEgg 1959-69 Tradewind 4 01-21-2011 08:54 AM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×