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Old 11-04-2017, 05:45 PM   #169
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Funny, just today I decided to take out two shelves in my Overlander bath cabinet. I figured the DW would want the hanging space for bathrobes and the like. The Overlander has a lot of storage space in the overhead lockers, behind the vanity mirror, and a shelf under the sink. Plenty of space for a safety razor and tube of toothpaste. What else does a guy need?

David
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Old 11-30-2017, 08:41 PM   #170
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WET FLOOR REPAIR

I needed to move the water pump slightly to make room for installing the disk brake hydraulic pump. This started another sequence of project creep. The fresh water tank is located under the front window behind the gaucho. I first noticed that the floor by the pump and next to the water tank was wet. I found that the cause was a leak at the inlet to the tank. The flexible white hose that feeds water to the tank (photo 1) had loosened up over time. This evidently has been leaking for a while. This is a real problem as we boondock mostly and even if we have public water available we usually just use the fresh water tank and pump. So every time we go camping we fill up the tank and since the inlet has been leaking the water goes right onto the floor. I removed the gaucho frame, the bottom of which was very wet. Of course I need to repair the gaucho frame now. Under the gaucho was some green patterned vinyl. The plywood floor under the vinyl was very wet (see first photo). The wet floor extended to the right gaucho panel which had damaged the bottom (photo 2). The water had also gotten under the cork floor that was in front of the right side of the gaucho and damaged the flooring causing a gap between the floor tiles (photo 3).

When I installed the cork floor (posts 3-7), I applied 3 coats of polyurethane to the plywood to protect it. What I learned is that any water that gets on the polyurethaned plywood floor will not penetrate the plywood but will be absorbed by the cork floor base and will damage it. The cork floor base seems to be like particle board. I am glad that I sealed the plywood floor. This just means that the water will damage the floor covering and not the plywood floor. So I have applied 3 coats of polyurethane to the plywood floor that will be under the gaucho and the fresh water tank and the pump area (photo 4). I now need to install some new cork flooring. I bought a little extra; I hope I have enough and that it matches ok.

Note that the square hole in the floor is a cold air return to the furnace. There is also one in the bathroom.

Dan
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Old 12-01-2017, 06:07 PM   #171
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Project creep is so typical of vintage Airstreams. I had to patch the floor close to the water pump on my Trade Wind some years ago. It has the same cold air return as your trailer.

Just this week, while removing the old reciprocating water pump in the Overlander, I discovered floor rot in front of the curb side wheel well. That's going to be a big project to repair. The galley cabinet is in the way along with the sink drain plumbing. Ugh.

I know you will whip this project out in no time flat.

David
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Old 12-27-2017, 09:09 PM   #172
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I commented earlier on Airstream's method of supporting the gray tank was to install a metal pan under the tank that would rust out over time.
Dan--I'm revisiting the attachment of the black tank (gray tank in your renovation) since I am now attaching plywood to the frame and want to install gray and black tanks in the process. Was your original metal pan made of galvanized steel or something else? What gauge was it?
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Old 12-28-2017, 06:25 PM   #173
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Hi Wayne: I'll bet Dan's and my black tank pans were the same galvanized steel. It was quite thin, maybe less than 18 gauge. It was also quite rusted.

David
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Old 12-28-2017, 07:42 PM   #174
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Hi Wayne: I'll bet Dan's and my black tank pans were the same galvanized steel. It was quite thin, maybe less than 18 gauge. It was also quite rusted.



David


David & Wayne

I was hoping that you (David) would chime in as I thought mine was galvanized steel that had rusted but I had no idea about the thickness.
In looking at your photo I see that it was bolted to the floor. I will never understand why Airstream did not just bolt or screw the black tank flange to the floor. This is what I did. I just see no reason for a pan.

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Old 12-29-2017, 06:25 PM   #175
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Possibly one reason for the pan was to insulate the tank "compartment" and heat it. I did have a "cold air return" passage through the tank pan. Another reason is some protection from road debris.

When the floor rot took over, my tank pan fell into the belly pan. The previous owner bolted a piece of pipe to the frame trying to hold the whole mess up off the road.

I agree with Dan that the tank flange is adequate to hold the Trade Wind tank up as long as the plastic hasn't become brittle with age.

Newer rotomolded tanks don't have flanges as it is not possible with the process. Airstream often used the tank pan as the support for the tank. My 86 black and gray tanks are supported by the tank pan only. (Well, the toilet flange connection, vent pipe connections, and drain pipe connections also kinda, sorta support the tank.)

David
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Old 12-29-2017, 09:27 PM   #176
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Dan and David--thanks for your thoughtful replies.

The black tank I hope to use came out of a '68 Sovereign I scuttled a few years ago. I can't remember what the pan looked like, but I'm sure it wasn't in good condition or I would have kept it. Today I retrieved the white bead styrofoam base that was below the tank. It's in reasonably good condition, so I placed it underneath the tank and measured the total height: 7 3/4". This certainly won't work unless I take an electric knife or another device to the foam. The dimension required for my '67 is 6 5/8".

I found a picture of a '67 or '68 pan, and it didn't even have the flanges as the '66 did. The support for the tank was a thin piece of galvanized steel set on two 1" angles about 58" wide. The foam probably spread the weight out to an extent, but how much? The whole system doesn't seem up to a 16 gallon tank, but they did last until the pan rusted so I guess Airstream knew what they were doing.

The second option is to screw it to the floor as Dan did. Was the top of the tank originally touching the underside of the floor? I'd like to make sure I don't have to worry about the toilet flange being too high.

The third option is a new tank, which would help getting the waste plumbing to the curbside as David did to his '66.
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Old 12-30-2017, 06:07 PM   #177
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Tank position relative to the floor depends on the toilet flange connection to the tank. Many old tanks have a female pipe thread spin weld in the correct location on top of the tank. The toilet flange male pipe fitting threads into this spin weld, and then is screwed to the 3/4" subfloor. The clearance hole in the subfloor accommodates the toilet flange and spin weld clearance.

I think I counted 11 different toilet flange configurations on the Vintage Trailer Supply site last month.

Once you have a toilet flange and tank connection that works, then you can determine if the tank bears tight to the subfloor bottom or if you need more clearance, like a piece of 1/2" plywood or something.

I've seen styrofoam around waste water tanks in all three Airstreams I've torn into. I assumed it was cheap insulation, not a tank support. And all three trailers have had a tank pan either to contain the heat, or to support the tank.

My Trade Wind tank has some sort of steel bulkhead connection to the top of the tank. I think the toilet flange held the tank in position pretty well. I also think the tank was way too thin. The tank pan didn't have much weight to carry. The toilet was some sort of complicated affair of slide valves and plumbing. I bet it weighed 50 pounds.

So Dan, being the logical type, says heck with a flush toilet and tank and goes for the Curve.

David
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Old 12-31-2017, 09:34 AM   #178
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Quote:
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I also think the tank was way too thin. The tank pan didn't have much weight to carry. The toilet was some sort of complicated affair of slide valves and plumbing. I bet it weighed 50 pounds.

So Dan, being the logical type, says heck with a flush toilet and tank and goes for the Curve.

David


I really strive for simple and light. That is the Curve toilet plus no need for a black tank.

I think the original tank will be fine for us, but it doesnít hold very much water- about 16 gallons. I can always replace it at some time in the future. It will be easy enough to remove the belly pan under the tank and just replace the tank. I will probably go with a custom made tank, maybe even make it myself. I think it will hold about 30 gallons. I would have a 2Ē outlet so it could tie into the 2Ē drain line from the shower and sinks.

I actually have the belly pan under the tank removed now as I am trying to stop a persistent drip from the outlet valve. I have a video but it doesnít seem to want to load.

Dan
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Old 12-31-2017, 06:43 PM   #179
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TouringDan: You ain't gonna make it big in Hollywood as a producer if you think your video of a leaky valve going drip, drip, drip will go viral. It's like watching corn grow or paint dry. Not the most exciting show around.



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Old 01-01-2018, 09:20 PM   #180
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David

You are correct. Probably a good thing it did not load.

It is frustrating though. I installed the new gate valve on the gray water tank and now it drips a bit. I am just really mad at myself that I didnít test it before I installed the tank. My error.

Dan
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:10 AM   #181
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The Tradewind has been off the road now for one year. We have really missed camping in it, but I finally finished installing the disc brakes and so we were finally able to take it out camping and could test all the improvements.

We went to Oregon Inlet CG in the Cape Hatteras National Seashore about 290 miles from our home. Click image for larger version

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The new disc brakes worked really well. There is a write up about the installation in the braking section. Operation of the disc brakes was even better than expected. No brake delay at all. No more panic when the light turns red and you now need to stop your towing rig right now and you are not sure how well your trailer brakes will work.

The 1000 watt inverter worked great. When we need a/c power, in this case for Brendaís hairdryer and the toaster, all we do is turn the inverter on with the remote button in the bathroom and then all the receptacles are live.

The street cleaning outlet valve for the gray water tank worked great also.

No the work is not finished, but at least we can now go camping when we want to.

The next major improvement will be new soft goods for the interior.

Dan
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:58 AM   #182
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I also wanted to comment on how well the 66 Tradewind towed with the all new running gear- New axle and suspension, shock absorbers, wheels and tires. It towed so well that most of the time I didnít feel the Airstream behind me. I felt like I was driving the Tradewind solo. The thought also occurred to me that our 66 Tradewind, now equipped with a state of the art disc brake system, was safer to tow than any new Airstream that you can buy today IMHO.

Based on how well the new disc brake system operates, I am really disappointed that Airstream doesnít provide this as standard equipment on New Airstreams.

Dan
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